PLATINUM2023

Humane Society of Washington County Incorporated

Promoting the welfare of companion and domestic animals

aka HSWC   |   Hagerstown, MD   |  www.hswcmd.org

Mission

The Humane Society of Washington County exists to promote the welfare of companion and domestic animals through educational programs and initiatives that reduce pet overpopulation, endorse fostering, enrich adoptions, and encourage responsible pet guardianship.

Ruling year info

1970

Executive Director

Colin A. Berry, M.S.

Main address

13011 Maugansville Rd

Hagerstown, MD 21740 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-0542025

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Humane Society of Washington County, Inc. addresses the needs of all lost, abandoned, neglected or abused animals, and the problem of feline overpopulation.

Our vision is to be the area's leading resource for animal related issues. Through strong community partnerships, we enhance and protect the lives of all animals by advocating responsible, compassionate relationships between people and animals while providing shelter, humane education, spay/neuter programs and adoptions.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Dialogue based adoptions

Working with potential adopters to find the best fit for their family and lifestyle.

Population(s) Served
Adults

With waived or reduced adoption fees throughout the year, there's a chance for everyone to adopt regardless of income.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our Foster Program is a robust volunteer program that saves the lives of hundreds of animals a year. Fospice Care is part of our foster program that allows people to care for animals in their twilight years.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our volunteer Traveling Fosters spend their own time and resources to care for hundreds of animals a year. They take animals, primary cats, into their homes and then take them to offsite adoption events to find them forever homes.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We work with multiple organizations who accept some of the animals we are unable to treat, rehabilitate, or place. One such organization is the Happy Hounds Prison Program.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HSWC is a member of a national network of animal rescue organizations and regularly works with The HSUS and ASPCA to offer relief to areas hit by natural and man-made disasters.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Animals are given opportunities to exercise natural behaviors through play and toys. They are also evaluated for behavior, and issues are addressed as needed.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HSWC's receiving clinic and onsite Veterinary Center evaluate animals and address their medical needs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our robust volunteer program includes an average of 300 active volunteers at any given time who donate thousands of hours a year.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our onsite store sells everything to need to make your pet feel at home!

Population(s) Served
Adults

Supplies food to individuals who come to the shelter seeking help for their pets and food for Field Services to deliver to families within the community

Population(s) Served
Adults

Public assistance vouchers are available through our CatSNIP, DogSNIP, and SNAP programs.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our HELP voucher program provides veterinary assistance to public animals in need.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HSWC's Resource Center works hard to keep pets with their people through behavior counseling, our pet food bank, and medical vouchers.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Kitten care kits help convert people surrendering litters of kittens into foster homes for the kittens. HSWC agrees to help place the kittens when they are old enough to be spayed and neutered.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Low cost clinics to help our community care for their pets

Population(s) Served
Adults

We monitor and post lost and found pet alerts and help reunite families.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Non-Profit of the Year 2018

19th Annual Washington County Business Awards

Affiliations & memberships

Non-Profit of the Year, 19th Annual Washington County Business Awards 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total Live Release Rate %

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Feline Live Release Rate %

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Canine Live Release Rate %

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of dogs reclaimed by their owners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of cats reclaimed by their owners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Live Outcome

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Includes Adoptions, Transfer to Rescue, Return to Owner, Foster, Fospice and TNR. Beginning in 2019, we changed our statistics collection and computation methods to be in line with industry standards.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Sadly, because free-roaming and feral cats are able to quickly and easily breed, the number of cats and kittens entering HSWC is staggering. Over the last 3 years, they have averaged 75% of our total annual intake and they average 92% of all animals euthanized. On the other hand, we have few dogs available for adoption. But many shelters across the US are forced to euthanize adoptable dogs because they have so many. HSWC currently engages in limited programs to help free-roaming and feral cats and at-risk dogs, but we aim to do more. We aim to significantly expand our feline spay/neuter efforts and increase the number of dogs accepted into our canine transfer program. By doing this, we will reduce the number of unwanted cats and kittens in Washington County and save dogs and puppies at risk of euthanasia in other areas of the country by placing them into our community's loving homes.

HSWC enjoys several collaborations that help support our animal care, spay/neuter, and transfer programs.

Prior to hiring a Veterinary team in May 2015 (for the first time in the shelter's history), we had worked with community veterinarians to provide medical treatment, spay/neuter, and other surgical procedures for our entire animal population. However, in recent years, we have been able to expand to a fully-staffed shelter Veterinary team and now perform nearly 100% of spay/neuter surgeries onsite. Our state-of-the-art facility and trained staff allow us to perform x-rays, dentals, complicated surgical procedures and more right here at the shelter. Although we will continue to occasionally rely on community veterinarians for certain procedures and emergencies, having the ability to do the majority of veterinary care internally is a significant cost-saver and eliminates additional stress on the animal.

We currently interface with feral cat caretakers to provide cat food and spay/neuter vouchers, or to perform TNR (Trap-Neuter-Return) spay/neuter surgeries weekly on Tuesdays. We have developed a robust TNR program, and TNR'd 945 community cats in 2021. We will continue to work with local feral cat caretakers to spay/neuter free-roaming cats and continue our work to eliminate the overpopulation of these cats in Washington County.

Finally, our volunteers are our partners in saving lives. On average, we have 250 active volunteers giving over 1,300 hours of service each month. These dedicated people range from retired medical professionals to teenagers seeking hands-on learning. Volunteer assignments span from working at special events, to walking dogs and bathing cats.

Specific to our programs to increase spaying/neutering of cats, volunteers play an integral role by supporting our animal care staff in providing specialized care and attention to the feline creatures that make up over three quarters of our shelter's total animal population. They assist with humane trapping efforts in the field, preparation and recovery of cats undergoing surgery and treatment, and daily care including cleaning, feeding, and general assessment of overall health & behavior. In addition, these skilled, devoted volunteers serve as adoption counselors, both at the shelter and at offsite adoption events, and ensure cats are being placed in responsible, loving homes.

Ongoing sources of support for our programs come from our general operating budget and fundraising efforts aimed specifically toward our lifesaving goals.

Through our contract with county government, we receive an annual subsidy of just over $1.4 million to provide all Field Services (animal control and humane law enforcement) for 150,000 people across 467 square miles.

The majority of the annual subsidy covers Field Services personnel, their equipment and supplies, and the general expenses of caring for the animals they rescue that are lost, abandoned or abused and in immediate need of veterinary care. The remaining portion of these funds is applied to the shelter's general operating expenses for the basic care of all animals, whether brought to the shelter by members of the public or picked up by our Field Services Officers. It is notable that Field Services Officers intake twice as many cats as dogs.

Aside from the County subsidy, HSWC's revenue streams are diversified and include: individual donation campaigns such as major gifts & mid-level donors, direct mail, and website & social media appeals; charitable foundations & trusts; special events & corporate sponsorships; income from programs, services & retail; and our endowment fund and bequests.

Numerous grantors have funded or currently fund our general operating expenses for spay/neuter and overall animal care. Most of those funding proposals include a component specific to the plight of felines and some of them focus solely on that need.

Each year, our Development department creates a fundraising plan to help ensure adequate funding for the shelter's initiatives.

HSWC's Live Release Rate (LRR) has steadily increased or stayed steady. In 2021, we saved the lives of 3,976 animals—a LRR of 85%.

What is next is what has been mentioned above: To continue our robust TNR program, and to increase the number of cats we spay/neuter and the number of dogs saved via our transfer program.

In addition, we plan to offer affordable health & wellness programs to publicly owned animals whose guardians live on a fixed income.

Finally, as always, we will continue to improve and elevate our procedures and systems to provide the best animal care, behavioral enrichment, and adoption match-making programs.

Financials

Humane Society of Washington County Incorporated
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Humane Society of Washington County Incorporated

Board of directors
as of 03/07/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jill Reddecliff

Erin Clark

Jill Reddecliff

Paulie Ward

Shannon Cianelli

Steve Quantock

Ashley Mills

Jessica Horn

Mariel Beachley

Brian Yurek

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data