PLATINUM2023

Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake, Inc.

Changing lives through the power of work!

aka Baltimore Goodwill Industries, Inc.   |   Baltimore, MD   |  www.goodwillches.org

Mission

Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake, Inc. prepares people to secure and retain employment and build successful independent lives.

Notes from the nonprofit

2016 Annual Report is available at www.TheGoodwillStory.org

Ruling year info

1938

Principal Officer

Ms. Lisa Rusyniak

Main address

222 East Redwood Street

Baltimore, MD 21202 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Baltimore Goodwill Industries, Inc.

EIN

52-0591576

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

While Maryland is one of the wealthiest states, a substantial part of our territory suffers from staggering poverty and unemployment. A recent study of the Baltimore Metropolitan area reports that 82% of low-income individuals face three or more barriers to employment opportunities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Waverly Family Support Center

In 1999, Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake, Inc. partnered with the Maryland Family Network to begin operation of the Waverly Family Support Center. The Center offers stable support systems in which parents and children have a comfortable environment to learn and develop educationally.

Serving expecting parents and parents with young children from birth to 47 months, the Center’s objective is to interrupt the cycle of poverty among families, provide support and counseling services, and links to other needed resources in the community. Most importantly, the Waverly Family Support Center empowers all parents educationally and economically.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Since 1986, the Schapiro Training & Employment Program (STEP) has been a pioneer in the formation of the supported employment movement for people with psychiatric disabilities who are also economically disadvantaged, placing them in competitive employment. At STEP, experienced Rehabilitation and Employment Specialists assist clients in learning the tasks necessary for successful job performance. Upon employer and employee satisfaction, the support is gradually withdrawn and the client is absorbed into the regular world of work.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Designed to assist participants who are interested in obtaining employment develop their skills in order to achieve self-sufficiency.

Population(s) Served
Adults

An ongoing computer training program customized to each student’s needs and expertise.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Goodwill offers GED preparation classes in conjunction with Baltimore City Community College.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Classroom instruction and hands on training are combined to give participants the skills needed to enter the custodial and maintenance fields

Population(s) Served
Adults

SEETTS offers training and support for ex-offenders in search of work opportunities.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Incarcerated people

Provides job opportunities and placements with over 400 employers in in the Baltimore Metropolitan area. Placement Assistance offers resume refinement with tailored job leads and information to hiring events and job fairs. Retention Services provides immediate follow- up for individuals obtaining employment, one-on-one job coaching and access to Employment Stability Services for case management.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Links participants with appropriate skills training opportunities in order to increase technical skills, employability and meet the demand of varying job opportunities. These opportunities include training and apprenticeship programs in areas like web/graphic design, information technology, retail, cybersecurity, C.N.A, coding and programming, carpentry and more.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Goodwill’s bilingual case management, job readiness and placement assistance services designed for the Latino population.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

CARF 2017

External assessments

Evaluated via the Impact Genome Project (2019)

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of service recipients who are employed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of meals served or provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of employer partners offering jobs to clients

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average wage of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake aims to close the unemployment gap by providing access to supportive services and programs that prepare people to secure and retain employment to build successful independent lives. \r\n\r\nOur goal is to decrease reliance on public subsidiaries by providing the tools to increase wages and foster self-sufficiency for individuals and their families.

Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake provides career development services, training programs and educational services tailored to assist unemployed and underemployed individuals to achieve gainful employment leading to self-sufficiency.\r\nNew and used donated items bought from our Goodwill stores and other philanthropic support enables the agency to provide workforce development, career services, case management, training and educational programs.

Among Baltimore area nonprofits surveyed in 2017, Goodwill is ranked 3rd among total number of employees, 6th in total revenue and 12th in total assets.\nSince Goodwill is approximately 90% self-supporting from the sales of contributed goods and industrial contracts, we depend on contributions from businesses and foundations to support our operations. \n\nWhile Goodwill's focus for many years was helping people with disabilities find gainful employment, that mission has expanded over the years. Goodwill has brought its years of experience to initiatives that train and place people with barriers to employment including dislocated workers, individuals with no work training, and those receiving public assistance, all the while maintaining its commitment to serve those with disabilities. \nToday, Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake employs more than 800 individuals, operates 32 store locations, career centers and programs, and provides stable employment for individuals with severe disabilities through four commercial service contracts for local government agencies.

For 101 years, Goodwill has provided comprehensive job readiness services that connect individuals to stable employment. Realizing that a lack of stable employment isn't simply due to a lack of desire, but rather a myriad of obstacles, Goodwill has pioneered a fully integrated service delivery model to connect individuals to staff to help address and remove those barriers, an approach that is substantiated by a successful track record of connecting individuals to employment and has steadily increased the number of job placements annually, as much as 51% since 2010. And not just into any position but instead, ones that offer stability. In fact as of 2019, the average hourly wage for Goodwill participants was $12.81, substantially higher than the state of Maryland's minimum wage of $10.10 per hour. In 2018 Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake served over 77,000 individuals placing over 1700 graduates with career pathways, including jobs in the construction trades, certified retail skills training program, healthcare and IT industry. \n\nIn the next year our goal is to continue to implement placement and retention best practices to ensure that we are providing our participants with the most effective resources to provide the best chance to earn middle skilled jobs and wages. We aim to increase mission awareness by working with faith-based organizations, soup kitchens and other partners to educate and deepen GIC's presence in local communities. We plan to continue to grow the ecommerce platform by the end of its second year with an expansion of staff and space. Furthermore, we will build on our strengths of effective case management and measuring outcomes as we develop a plan to seek additional CARF accreditation for our community-based workforce services.

Financials

Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 01/24/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Joe Durham


Board co-chair

Ms. Olivia Farrow

David J. Downey

Joe Durham

Jeff Jacobson

Lisa Rusyniak

Seth Dunbar

Olivia Farrow

Dennis Finnegan

Cailey Locklair

Dean Kenderdine

Lillian Suffolk-Kilroy

Bob Kimmons

Claude Lijoi

Jayne Miller

Joel Suldan

Frances Taylor

Joyce R. Van Dee

Kim Clark

Michele Cohen

Joan Corcoran

Joy Bramble

Dave Carberry

Peter Chesner

Joshua Savadove

Willis Macgill

Stacey Butler

Thomas Finney

Linda Foy

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/24/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 01/24/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.