Amnesty International USA, Inc. HQ

It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness.

aka AIUSA   |   New York, NY   |  www.amnestyusa.org

Mission

Our vision is of a world in which every person – regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation or gender identity – enjoys all of the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and other internationally recognized human rights standards. The UDHR states that the "the recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights" of all people is "the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world."

Ruling year info

1992

Principal Officer

Paul O' Brien

Main address

311 W 43rd St 7th Fl

New York, NY 10036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-0851555

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990-N.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

All people have fundamental human rights. But those rights are abused or denied every single day. When that happens, Amnesty International finds the facts, exposes what’s happening, and rallies people together to force governments and others to respect everyone’s human rights. And we get results. Last year alone, Amnesty International helped free hundreds of people who were wrongfully imprisoned because of who they are or what they believe – and we changed laws in dozens of countries on refugees, reproductive rights, LGBT equality, free speech, the death penalty, and other critical human rights issues. A number of families who had come to the U.S. to escape violence and persecution, only to be thrown behind bars, were released thanks to the relentless advocacy of Amnesty members. From start to finish, our work focuses on the individual – people whose human rights are abused, and people who have the power to change the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Campaigns and Actions

Takes the lead in developing this section’s human rights
strategy and carrying out the specialized tasks necessary for the implementation of those strategies. It also responds to and mobilizes membership to influence state and con-state actors to support and protect human rights.  Activists and staff work on urgent actions, interact with and speak out to policy and opinion-makers, and undertake a range of major campaigns, country actions, and corporate approaches.

Population(s) Served
Victims and oppressed people
Immigrants and migrants

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is of a world in which every person - regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation or gender identity - enjoys all of the human rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and other internationally recognized human rights standards.

Amnesty International’s uniquely effective approach for protecting human rights uses a three-pronged approach:

RESEARCH
Our crisis response teams and researchers travel to affected areas around the world to uncover individual human rights abuses and document patterns of abuse.

MOBILIZATION
Our campaign teams use this research to educate the public about human rights abuses – and they give members and grassroots activists the information and tools they need to demand that human rights be protected.

ADVOCACY
Our staff and volunteer leaders engage in direct advocacy with policymakers at the state and federal levels in the U.S., while we rally grassroots activists from all 50 states to demand that policymakers protect human rights in the U.S. and around the world.

Amnesty International USA has more than a million members and activists in all 50 states, who are part of a larger global movement of 10 million people in 150 countries. We are a democratically governed, grassroots membership organization, which means that our members vote on key policy issues and elect our Board of Directors.

Tens of thousands of people have been freed after we campaigned against their unjust imprisonment for exercising their human rights since our inception. For instance, in 2020, in the face of a global pandemic that exposed systemic inequalities, Amnesty International USA’s staff, members, and activists worked tirelessly for human rights in the U.S. and around the world. In 2020, our work contributed to positive developments on 88 individual cases, the release of 61 prisoners of conscience, and had a crucial impact on 562 human rights defenders cases. Our advocacy also contributed to the passage of S. Res 142 in the full Senate, which calls for the release of Senator Leila de Lima in the Philippines.

Freeing people from immigration detention continued to be one of our top priority areas of work due to the urgent risk of illness and death posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Tens of thousands of immigrants and asylum-seekers locked up by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) were left behind to face these turbulent times alone, in facilities where conditions are well-documented to have substandard medical care, inadequate basic hygiene, and overcrowding. Through the power of collective action, 3,722 calls, 10,596 letters, and 36,152 petitions were made to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and contributed to the release of several asylum-seekers, including families with children. Our partners on the ground noted that Amnesty’s Congressional advocacy and coalition-building was integral in achieving this progress.

With regard to domestic human rights crises, we engaged in campaign work to stop the killing of Black people
by police and to stop violence against Black Lives Matter protesters in the wake of the extrajudicial execution
and torture of George Floyd by police officers in Minneapolis. Our Research team produced numerous reports
throughout the campaign, including, “The World is Watching: Mass Violations by U.S. Police of Black Lives
Matter Protesters’ Rights,” “Losing the Peace: U.S. Police Failures to Protect Protesters from Violence” and
the ground-breaking virtual monitoring map of incidents of police violence across the country.

In 2021, Amnesty called upon the Biden administration to quickly adopt a bold, transformational human rights agenda. We were able to achieve a number of early and important victories that have helped dismantle some of the previous administration’s most anti-human rights policies including repeal of the global gag rule; halting support for the Saudi-led coalition that has inflicted untold suffering in Yemen; and securing a pledge from the President to increase the refugee admissions cap and begin to restore U.S. leadership in welcoming people fleeing violence and persecution.

AIUSA will continue to fight for the rights of asylum seekers, prisoners of conscience and for human rights defenders worldwide.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Amnesty International is a global movement of millions of people demanding human rights for all people – no matter who they are or where they are. We work to protect people wherever justice, freedom, truth and dignity are denied.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

Amnesty International USA, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Amnesty International USA, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 12/3/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Alexandra Durbak

Tameika Atkins

Matthew Kennis

David Yu

Vibha Venkatesha

Emma Green

Jessica Evans

Aaron Fellmeth

Ali Arab

Penelope Halkiadakis

Angie Hougas

Phyllis Pautrat

Leonard Torrealba

Oleh Tustaniwsky

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data