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National Network for Youth

Collaborate. Advocate. Transform

Washington, DC   |  http://www.nn4youth.org

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Mission

National Network for Youth is on a mission to transform systems so that no young person in America experiences homelessness.

Ruling year info

1975

Executive Director

Ms. Darla J. Bardine

Main address

741 8TH STREET SE STE A

Washington, DC 20003 USA

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Formerly known as

National Network of Runaway and Youth Services,

EIN

52-1009952

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Human Service Organizations (P20)

Professional Societies, Associations (P03)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Youth and young adult homelessness in America is a broad and complex issue that requires a multitude of responses. Nationally, 1 in 30, or about 700,000, youth ages 13 to 17 and 1 in 10, or about 3.5 million, young adults ages 18 to 24 experience homelessness every year in America. Further, rural and urban youth homelessness occur at very similar rates, and half of the youth facing homelessness each year are doing so for the first time. Homelessness is not a choice for many young people. It results from multiple forms of injustice and is deeply rooted in structural racism, discrimination, systemic oppression, and intergenerational cycles of poverty, addiction, and trauma. The National Network for Youth (NN4Y) works to advance equity, rights, dignity, and accountability by building bridges between communities, young people, youth service providers, and policymakers to challenge the current status quo boldly.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Public Education and Policy Advocacy

Public Education and Policy Advocacy: Advocates for policies to reform systems that put young people in vulnerable situations and strengthen communities' capacity to effectively prevent and respond to youth homelessness, focusing on black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) and LGBTQ+ youth and includes education, child welfare, employment, housing, and juvenile justice system reform.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people
Out-of-home youth

The NYAC represents a vital bridge between formerly homeless young people and policymakers, service providers, and community officials throughout the country. NN4Y provides leadership development and advocacy training and a platform for our Youth Advisors to collaborate and identify practices that help young people avoid and overcome homelessness. Moreover, they advocate directly to policymakers for solutions to youth and young adult homelessness.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people
Out-of-home youth

NN4Y provides support to communities to create Local Cross-System Collaboratives (LCSC) to address the root causes of homelessness among young people by advancing innovative, long-term solutions through multi-pronged and multi-level collaborative community work. These cross-system collaboratives improve systems and direct services to youth at-risk of and experiencing homelessness in their community by bringing together a broad range of stakeholders and assisting them in leveraging their strengths to increase effectiveness.

NN4Y brings considerable resources to each community it collaborates with, but success comes from the hard work of each LCSC member. Each community determines its own goals to ensure that all members are lending their strengths to the same ends, and that these goals are based on each community’s unique needs and resources.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth

Forming collaborative partnerships is not an easy task across the human services field. NN4Y provides support to communities to create Local Cross-System Collaboratives (LCSC) on Youth Homelessness to address the root causes of homelessness among young people. We bring together a broad range of stakeholders and help them leverage their strengths to transform systems and increase their effectiveness to advance innovative, long-term solutions through multi-pronged and multi-level collaborative community work. These cross-system collaboratives center youth with lived experience and improve systems to prevent and respond to YYA experiences of homelessness in communities.

Population(s) Served

We provide training and practice improvement consulting and resources to improve service provision within systems, communities, and community-based organizations.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Homeless people
Out-of-home youth
At-risk youth
Homeless people
Out-of-home youth

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

National Network for Youth envisions a world where all young people have a safe place to call home with endless opportunities to reach their full potential. We are the nation’s leading network of youth, advocates, and community-based service providers dedicated to preventing and ending youth and young adult homelessness.

NN4Y centers youth with lived experience to transform systems through strengthening the capacity of communities to transform systems, increase access to community-based services, educating the public and policymakers, and advocating for policy reform.

To address youth and young adult homelessness, we must begin to and robustly focus on preventing all forms of
homelessness young people experience. These prevention efforts should be directed at:

1.the systems that are the biggest drivers of homelessness for youth;
2.the systems that see and serve youth at-risk of experiencing homelessness;
3.and the community-based service providers that youth and their families seek help and assistance from.

You will never end homelessness for all ages and stages without a significantly increased focus on homelessness among young people. The National Network for Youth fights to advance prevention and response strategies to combat all forms of homelessness that youth and young adults (YYA) experience.

YYAs experiencing homelessness have unique needs. Rather than addressing YYA homelessness as a sub-bullet in our national response with a primary focus on housing, we propose a holistic and whole-person approach. When the government endorses a comprehensive approach to preventing and ending youth and young adult homelessness, this empowers our states and community partners to improve their response and help ensure that our youth and young adults thrive and meet their full potential.

NN4Y works with our partners to advocate for policies to reform systems that put young people in vulnerable situations and strengthen communities' capacity to effectively prevent and respond to youth homelessness and human trafficking-- focusing on BIPOC and LGBTQ+ youth taking a cross-system approach that includes education, child welfare, employment, housing, and juvenile justice system reform.

We work closely with both federal agency staff and Members of U.S. Congress to advocate for national policies that work for young people. We leverage the relationships of our network to influence these policymakers.

Through our network, we encourage service providers and systems to leverage diverse resources and implement best practices for young people, even before they are required to do so by law.

We provide systems and community-level practice information about how rural, suburban, and urban communities can actively work to prevent and effectively respond to youth and young adult homelessness.

Through public presentations and social media, we educate the public and policymakers about the issue of youth and young adult homelessness in America and what actions they can take to decrease the number of young people who experience homelessness.

NN4Y has been doing this work for over 40 years and is the leading voice on youth and young adult homelessness in the United States.

NN4Y's work is informed by data, research, and a national network of over 300 human services providers with extensive frontline knowledge in addressing this issue. We engage and listen to the young people themselves, who know what it means to have no home and nowhere to turn.

Our robust network enables us to mobilize advocates — both youth and adults — quickly and at all levels to educate and engage policymakers. Together, our work results in positive, real-life systems change for thousands of youth across the country.

Informed by our connections to providers and young people, we have forged trusted relationships with policymakers who rely on our expertise to make sound choices for youth in the systems and programs they administer.

OUR COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION:

The Board unanimously approved a new three-year strategic plan, which makes a deep commitment to advancing diversity, equity, and inclusion both internally and in the support we provide to our members. This is just the beginning. In the next three years, we will be rolling out robust training and research to inform system-level changes.

INVESTING IN AND STRENGTHENING THE WORK OF YOUTH PROVIDER AGENCIES:

Pivoted our work amidst the coronavirus pandemic to get information quickly to service providers, provide support to providers through weekly office hours, and supported our young leaders.

Successfully advocated for $25 million in CARES Act dollars to go to Runaway and Homeless Youth Act grantee agencies to help pay for the increased expenses in serving our young people amidst the pandemic.

We partnered with Baker McKenzie to create a guide for youth experiencing homelessness to access economic stimulus payment and tax resources for providers. Additionally, we advocated with Congress and the treasury to make it easier for youth experiencing homelessness to access these funds.

We wrote and submitted comments in opposition to proposed changes to HUD’s Equal Access Rule with our Policy Advisory Committee and National Youth Advisory Council.

We published and disseminated high-quality and responsive resource guides, fact sheets, and reports to educate and advise service providers, systems representatives, and policymakers.

In collaboration with SchoolHouse Connection and Family Promise, we co-hosted bipartisan congressional briefings about the coronavirus’s impact on youth and families experiencing homelessness.

We worked with our partners to draft and get the Emergency Family Stabilization Act introduced – a bipartisan bill
that would create a temporary emergency fund to serve children, youth, and families experiencing homelessness administered at the Administration on Children and Families at HHS.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is hard to come up with good questions to ask people, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

National Network for Youth
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Network for Youth

Board of directors
as of 12/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brennon Graham

Growing Home Southeast, Columbia, SC

Term: 2022 -

Leon Andrews

National League of Cities’ Race, Equity and Leadership (REAL)

Jeffrey Fetzko

Independent Consultant

Arash Ghafoori

Nevada Partnership for Homeless Youth

Brennon Graham

Growing Home Southeast

Sparky Harlan

Bill Wilson Center

Melanie Heitkamp

Youthworks/Mountain Plains Youth Services

Pat Holterman-Hommes

Youth In Need

Laurie Jackson

National Safe Place

Alison Kear

Covenant House Alaska

Deborah Shore

Sasha Bruce Network

David Baker

Youth Systems Director | YMCA of San Diego County

William Bentley

Former Associate Commissioner, Family and Youth Services Bureau, HHS

Aja K Ellington

ounder and CEO Free Your Wings Youth Mentoring, Inc., South Bend, IN

Hillary Evans

Vice President of Professional Learning & Public Policy, Philanthropy Southwest

Melinda Giovengo

Boston, MA

Richard Hooks Wayman

Volunteers of America Northern New England

Benjamin Saldana

Intensive Case Manager for HIV Services at GBAPP Inc. Bridgeport, CT

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/21/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data