Alliance for Justice

Washington, DC   |  http://www.afj.org

Mission

Alliance for Justice is a national association of over 130 organizations, representing a broad array of groups committed to progressive values and the creation of an equitable, just, and free society. Since 1979, AFJ has been the leader in advocating for a fair and independent justice system, preserving access to the courts, and empowering others to stand up and fight for their causes. The two pillars of Alliance for Justice are our Justice Program, focusing on ensuring our nation’s courts protect our critical constitutional rights and legal protections, and our Bolder Advocacy Program, focusing on building advocacy capacity for nonprofits and the foundations that fund them.

Ruling year info

1974

Principal Officer

Mr. Rakim Brooks

Main address

11 Dupont Circle NW, Suite 500 Suite 500

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1009973

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Administration of Justice, Courts (Court Administration, Court Reform, Alternatives to Litigation and Sentencing) (I50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Change in control of the Senate has created an opportunity for the new administration to undo some of the damage caused during four years of unchecked ultraconservative control over the judicial nominations process, during which more than 200 ultraconservative and often unqualified nominees were confirmed to the federal courts. AFJ's Justice program is supporting the efforts of the Biden administration to nominate demographically and experientially diverse judges to the federal bench. Our Bolder Advocacy program is helping nonprofits and foundations learn to become better and more assertive advocates for their missions, as they work to safeguard and promote democratic principles, education, immigrant rights, civic participation, and other essential causes. Many of these organizations are unaware of the range of impactful advocacy activities in which they can legally engage.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Justice Program

AFJ leads the fight for a justice system that upholds rights for all Americans; providing comprehensive research on nominees to federal circuit and district courts and mobilizing allies to support fair-minded and highly qualified nominees. Our efforts galvanize the courts-advocacy movement within the progressive community to oppose those unsuited for lifetime seats on the federal bench. AFJ ensures equal access to the justice system, tracking Supreme and lower court decisions affecting the legal rights of Americans, exposing efforts to narrow those rights, and working to advocate for progressive legislation and courts that will respect the access to justice. Our State Courts Justice Project is an a first-of-its-kind 50-state resource with information about the justices who serve on the state supreme courts designed to inform the media, court-watchers, legislators, and the public by equipping users with the information they need to be effective advocates for these critical courts.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Through specialized training, a comprehensive library of advocacy resources, and one-on-one technical assistance, Bolder Advocacy (BA) makes complex legal rules easily understandable to the nonprofit and philanthropic communities and helps these groups—including new and emerging organizations—to legally implement advocacy strategies to advance their mission and support their community. BA works extensively with nonprofits that advocate for underrepresented/underserved communities, as well as those working for social, racial, and climate justice. In addition to written factsheets and guides, our strategies to enhance the progressive movement sector’s capacity to engage in advocacy include producing our Rules of the Game podcast using real examples to demystify laws and help nonprofits be bolder advocates; holding frequent webinars on assorted relevant topics; and sharing the stories of our partners’ successes through our website and social media platforms.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Alliance for Justice works to ensure that the federal judiciary advances core constitutional values, preserves human rights and unfettered access to the courts, and adheres to the even-handed administration of justice for all Americans. We also envision a day when nonprofits that advocate for the rights of all Americans are full and robust participants in our democracy, utilizing all their legal rights and opportunities to advocate for their missions and giving voice to communities that include those who have been historically marginalized and underserved.

Our Justice program produces detailed reports and other materials on federal and select state judicial nominees, and galvanizes a large and diverse coalition of advocates and energizes millions of people to prioritize the courts. Through our extensive networks in the legal, advocacy, legislative and academic communities, we mobilize demand for courts that uphold our core constitutional values. Our Bolder Advocacy program offers a comprehensive suite of trainings, technical assistance, and resources to empower the nonprofit and foundation communities to engage in advocacy on behalf of their constituencies.

Alliance for Justice is a national association of over 130 organizations, representing a broad array of groups committed to progressive values and the creation of an equitable, just, and free society. For over 40 years, AFJ has been the leader in advocacy for a federal judiciary that advances core constitutional values, preserves human rights and access to the courts, and adheres to the even-handed administration of justice for all Americans.

AFJ’s work is divided into two main programs: our Justice program, and our Bolder Advocacy program. Our Justice program comprises a team of attorneys with expertise on the federal judiciary, while Bolder Advocacy is the leading authority on the legal framework governing nonprofit advocacy. Bolder Advocacy's lawyers, coaches and nonprofit experts have one big goal: to make advocacy easy and accessible for nonprofit and foundation leaders who want to be great advocates for their causes. Bolder Advocacy experts understand the rules that govern nonprofits’ ability to advocate, as well as the wide range of advocacy options that are open to nonprofits. They dedicate themselves to offering tools, training and resources to nonprofits that want to become better advocates. Both teams are supported by Outreach and Communications staff.

AFJ has been a leader in campaigns around Supreme Court and lower-court nominations since our inception. Since January 2021 AFJ has built on our decades of experience in judicial nominations advocacy to ensure in significant progress by the Biden administration toward filling the federal judiciary with qualified, unbiased, and diverse judges. As of this writing, the White House has nominated a total of 132 judges to the federal bench, 76 of whom have been confirmed by the Senate, including the Supreme Court's, Ketanji Brown Jackson. Many were surfaced by AFJ’s early and ongoing work to identify potential nominees. Because of the Administration’s trust in our input and their own commitment to transforming the federal judiciary, Biden’s judges are exceptionally diverse both in terms of demographics and experiences. 75% of these nominees are women and 68% are people of color—two record achievements. Experientially, their histories range from work as public defenders (most notably Justice Ketanji Brown Jackson) and legal aid lawyers to civil rights and plaintiff-side attorneys. 

Our Bolder Advocacy program continues to train thousands of advocates and offer up-to-the-minute materials on the rules and regulations governing nonprofit and foundation advocacy. We have provided trainings, technical assistance, and publications and resources to thousands of organizations over the past several years, empowering them to advocate on behalf of their causes and constituencies.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    AFJ's Bolder Advocacy program provides workshops, legal resources, and free technical assistance to a diverse array of nonprofit organizations to build their advocacy capacity and understanding of how to navigate nonprofit advocacy rules and regulations. Through AFJ's Justice programs, we also serve advocates across the nation who want to learn more about the importance of federal and state courts, and support those working to diversify the courts to ensure a judicial system that reflects our communities. Alliance for Justice also serves our over 130 membership organizations representing a diverse array of missions and foci.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We have received feedback from many nonprofit organizations that they would like us to offer our standard webinar topics on-demand. In response to this feedback, we are now taking steps to build out an online platform to offer on-demand workshops virtually at low or no cost to participants.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Collecting feedback from the organizations we serve led us to be more responsive when we make decisions about our curriculum – rather than assume we already know what they need. I.e. after our workshops moved online as a result COVID, we received feedback that we should provide closed captioning. So we began providing closed captioning as the “default” and check with organizations requesting customized workshops about whether they need closed captioning provided. We have also received feedback from Spanish-speaking advocates that they would like us to offer more of our trainings, technical assistance, and resources in Spanish. This led us to expand our bilingual staff to a team of three attorneys and a program coordinator, so that someone is always available to provide these services.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

Alliance for Justice
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Alliance for Justice

Board of directors
as of 08/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Paulette Meyer

Rakim Brooks

Alliance for Justice

Barbara Gonzalez-McIntosh

Student Conservation Association

Deepak Gupta

Gupta PLLC

Clay Hiles

Hudson River Foundation

Farhana Khera

Muslim Advocates

Rachel Levin

Fundamental, Inc.

Bill Lurye

AFSCME

Paulette Meyer

Norman Rosenberg

Rosenberg Consulting, LLC

Jahan Sagafi

Outten & Golden, LLP

Bradley Whitford

Khalil Shahyd

Natural Resources Defense Council

Carol Hamilton

Serra Falk Goldman

Falk, Cornell & Associates, LLP

Akunna Cook

Christopher Torres

MoveOn

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 05/27/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.