Clean Water Fund

aka CWF   |   Washington, DC   |  www.cleanwaterfund.org

Mission

CWF's mission is to develop strong grassroots environmental leadership and to bring together diverse constituencies to work cooperatively for changes that improve their lives, focused on health, consumer, environmental and community problems.

Ruling year info

1977

President and CEO

Mr. Robert Wendelgass

Main address

1444 Eye St, NW Suite 400

Washington, DC 20005 USA

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EIN

52-1043444

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (C01)

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Clean Water Fund Programming

Global warming is no longer a problem to be answered in the future-it must be addressed today. Science confirms that global warming is real, present and caused by human activity. The International Panel on Climate Change warns(http://www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/science/ipcc-highlights1.html) that, without intervention, temperatures may increase more than 10°F by the end of this century. As the world grows hotter, water resources will become scarcer and more seasonal. Increasingly frequent heat waves will be accompanied by intense storms, dangerous floods and severe drought.

We must act quickly to prevent these worst-case scenarios, and we should begin by rethinking our energy sources. Currently, we rely almost exclusively on fossil fuel and nuclear energy production methods, which accelerate climate change while contaminating our water resources with ionizing radiation, heavy metals and chemical pollution. In addition, these established energy production methods rely on a steady and reliable supply of water. In fact, the Department of Energy confirms energy production is the second highest water user in the country, exceeded only by agriculture. As global warming worsens and droughts becomes more common, our existing power plants may not be able to secure enough water to support energy production.

The IPCC warns that we must decrease our greenhouse gas emissions 80% by 2050 in order to avoid the worst effects of global warming. We can reach this goal by developing a new energy economy and the policies to support this move. We must:

Dramatically reduce our current reliance on fossil fuel based energy sources(http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/aer/pecss_diagram.html) .
Make the switch renewable energy sources for electricity, such as wind and solar.
Increase efficiency and use of alternative fuel sources in the transportation sector and increase use of public transportation.
Institute immediate energy efficiency and conservation measures, which reap benefits quickly and economically.

As we develop a new energy economy, we will face challenging decisions about energy production and consumption. Our current fossil fuel driven energy industry contributes daily to accelerating global warming through the emissions of climate-altering gases(http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_energy/coalvswind/brief_coal.html) . These same power plants taint our drinking water and damage essential habitats with heavy metals and chemical pollution. Finally, global warming has already begun to affect our water supplies, which will only become more limited. This means we must identify energy sources that are not dependent upon consistent, reliable water supplies. In fact, many of our current energy sources will no longer be available as water grows scarcer.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Financials

Clean Water Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Clean Water Fund

Board of directors
as of 08/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Maxine Lipeles

Kate Reid Koeze

Community volunteer

William Fontenot

Community volunteer

David Hahn-Baker

Inside/Out Political Consultants

Vernice Miller-Travis

Skeo Strategies

Maxine Lipeles

Washington University

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/7/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 04/30/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.