PLATINUM2023

Maryland Food Bank, Inc.

Until Hunger Ends

aka MFB   |   Baltimore, MD   |  https://www.mdfoodbank.org

Mission

Feeding people, strengthening communities, and ending hunger for more Marylanders.

Ruling year info

1979

President & CEO

Carmen Del Guercio

Main address

2200 Halethorpe Farms Road

Baltimore, MD 21227 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1135690

NTEE code info

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

With 1 in 3 Marylanders facing food insecurity, chances are, hunger has touched someone you know. But hunger is much more than a number, it is a complex social issue with many causes and far-reaching consequences. Only when we have a complete understanding of what hunger means and how it truly impacts Marylanders can we realistically find the solution to end it. By several measures, Maryland is considered a great place to live, one you might not expect hunger to be so widespread. While U.S. News recently ranked it as the wealthiest state in the country, one in every three of us may suffer from food insecurity. Many Marylanders, including children, face very low food security – a condition associated with progressive symptoms of starvation.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Nutritious Food Purchase and Distribution

Nutritious Food Purchase and Distribution: Pre-COVID, MFB purchased 12 million pounds of food at a cost of $.45 per pound. Due to the continued need for food assistance, inflation, and ongoing supply chain issues, in FY23 we are expecting to purchase roughly 25 million pounds of food at $.90 per pound, which is double the cost. Despite this, MFB remains committed to purchasing higher quality, nutritious food, which is typically more expensive.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Families

Summer/Supper Clubs: Often, food-insecure children are at higher risk of not eating enough or at all when they don’t have access to food from their schools. To combat this, Summer and Supper Clubs are held at participating after-school and summer program sites to provide hungry kids with nutritious meals during crucial out of school time.

Population(s) Served

School Pantry Program: This program provides food-insecure children and their families with direct access to nutritious food staples through the schools’ choice of a same day distribution model or a traditional “in-school” pantry.

Population(s) Served

FoodWorks Culinary Training Program: Now in its twelfth year, this 12-week workforce development program offers classes in three locations (Halethorpe, Baltimore City, and Salisbury) and targets individuals struggling to earn a livable wage. FoodWorks instills graduates with professional job-readiness skills through culinary training. In addition to their cultivation into future skilled employees, FoodWorks students support the food bank by converting fresh produce and perishable foods into healthy meals to distribute to those in need.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Farm to Food Bank: In partnership with approximately 50 farms and orchards across the state, this program helps fill nutritional food gaps and address “food deserts” by providing food-insecure, often low-income communities with access to fresh fruits and vegetables.

Population(s) Served

SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) Outreach: The Maryland Food Bank’s SNAP Outreach team educates individuals on available government resources and helps eligible Marylanders sign up for SNAP Benefits (formerly known as “food stamps”). Our team follows a “SNAP Plus” approach to assist our neighbors with additional wrap-around services by connecting them with referral networks and offering solutions to barriers to food security.

Population(s) Served

Pantry on the Go (POTG): In areas across the state with high concentrations of poverty and food insecurity, we hold mobile pantries to bring large quantities of food and produce to those who have little access to other forms of hunger relief. These Pantry on the Go events combat different barriers to food access, like transportation and mobility challenges.

Population(s) Served

Mobile Markets: Developed to address regionally-defined root causes of hunger and help us serve Marylanders more holistically, these vehicles function as “on-the-go” supermarkets, travelling to underserved communities to provide access to nutritious food, nutrition education materials, and resources beyond food.

Population(s) Served

Back Up Boxes (BUBs): These 15 to 30 lb. food kits bring shelf-stable, nutritious food, nutrition information, and recipes to food-insecure households. Today, partners distribute fresh produce alongside these boxes, and they often tailor BUBs to address the specific cultural and diet-related needs of different communities, such as older adults, people with diabetes, and Latin communities.  

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of meals delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Nutritious Food Purchase and Distribution

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

MFB distributed 49 million pounds, totaling nearly 41 million meals in FY 2022. https://mdfoodbank.org/about/financials/

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We aim to lead the movement and nurture the belief that together we can improve the lives of Marylanders by ending hunger.

Through carefully crafted programs and reliable community partnerships, the food bank aims to meet the immediate needs of Marylanders while simultaneously working to find long-term ways to reduce hunger statewide.

The Maryland Food Bank has 40 years of experience serving food-insecure residents in 21 counties and Baltimore City. With more than 10 full-time staff members dedicated to ending hunger in Maryland and with 1,150 statewide points of distribution helping us get food into the hands and homes of those who need it most, we are at the heart of the food assistance network in Maryland.

As a partner of Feeding America, the national network of food banks, we also have access to the most accurate data on food security in Maryland. We use this data to address the most pressing needs in our state.

Over the past four years (FY12-FY15), the Maryland Food Bank has doubled the amount of food we distribute, from 26.5 million pounds annually to 53 million pounds last year.

While the most recent Map the Meal Gap Study showed that the meal gap had narrowed by 2.5 million meals in the Maryland Food Bank's service area, more than 760,000 Marylanders remain food insecure.

The food bank will work to expand its impact until hunger ends.

Financials

Maryland Food Bank, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Maryland Food Bank, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 02/24/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Jennifer Dardis

T. Rowe Price

Term: 2021 -

Jennifer Dardis

T. Rowe Price

Bill Dockman

W.R. Grace & Co.

Tom Albero

Alliance Material Handling, Inc.

Dawnavan S. Davis

Mathematica

Keith Shapiro

Sysco (Ret.)

Joe Urban

Giant Food

Terry Squyres

GWWO Architects

Mike Blair

Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson, Inc

Derrick Dickens

BG&E

Mary Kate Federico

Ernst & Young

Shaneka Henson

Maryland State Delegate

Alia Kemet

Shipt

Mary Frances ISakov

M&T Bank

Rachel O'Neill

Travelers Insurance

Melanie Perreault

Towson University

Jennifer Reilly

Perdue

Dawn M. Rhodes

University of Maryland, Baltimore

Steve Schwalb

Bob Waldman

Venable

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/29/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data