Human Services

WINTER GROWTH INC

Where friendships grow and care is extraordinary

Olney, MD

Mission

Winter Growth's Mission is to foster community by empowering seniors and adults with disabilities to live their best lives. We do this by listening and creating an environment for connections. Our Vision is to be the leader in person-centered care.

Ruling Year

1979

Executive Director

Ms. Cyndi Rogers

Main Address

18110 Prince Phillip Drive

Olney, MD 20832 USA

Keywords

Assisted Living, Adult Medical Daycare

EIN

52-1153556

 Number

6403380422

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Residential, Custodial Care (Group Home) (P70)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

Our founder created Winter Growth in 1979 because of her dreams and passion to create better services for society's most vulnerable population. She was determined that Winter Growth's services would be provided in a way that offered quality of life for seniors facing chronic illnesses and disabilities, as well as much-needed support for their families.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

3

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Assisted Living

Adult Medical Day Care

Assisted Transportation

Respite Care

Where we work

Our Results

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one. These quantitative program results are self-reported by the organization, illustrating their committment to transparency, learning, and interest in helping the whole sector learn and grow.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Number of Adult Day Care clients

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Related program

Adult Medical Day Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Adult Day Care client service days

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Related program

Adult Medical Day Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

TOTALS BY YEAR
Population(s) served

Aging, elderly, senior citizens

Related program

Adult Medical Day Care

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Winter Growth believes our clients still have the ability to have meaningful relationships and experiences and we have tailored both our adult daycare and assisted living programs to maximize each individual's capacity to be an active member of our community. While most adult daycare programs and assisted living homes are stand-alone facilities, Winter Growth recognized that the combination of the two programs under one roof would be beneficial for clients. With the inclusion of onsite an adult daycare program our residents can increase their circle of friends and find kindred spirits.

Most local assisted living homes that are small like Winter Growth, with 16 or less residents, do not offer private rooms for their residents. Of the homes that do have a few private rooms, none are available to clients funded by Medicaid instead, low income residents are required to share a room with a stranger who may be loud and disruptive due to the progression of dementia. Winter Growth, however, recognizes the importance of having a private space for everyone regardless of their funding source. Having to give up one's independence is difficult. No longer having your own home, the ability to take care of oneself, and the freedom to travel alone whenever you want can be an emotional burden. Winter Growth recognizes the sacrifices these individuals have made due to their declining health and is committed to ensuring that each resident has their own special space. Due to our commitment to honoring the dignity of all those we serve, these adults can have a private room to retreat to when they are tired, to privately visit with guests, and to create a space with their own pictures and personal belongings that makes it feel like they are indeed home.

Winter Growth is working to strengthen its person-centered care model. Person-centered care promotes choice, purpose and meaning in daily life. This approach will result in better quality outcomes with staff being able to identify and respond quickly and appropriately to the changing needs of our clients.

To accomplish this goal, staff is continuously reviewing current processes and procedures to determine what adjustments can be made to better serve client preferences. We examine many areas including our dining services, our current morning wake up times and evening bedtimes, and our outing schedule. Staff creates a process for clients and/or family members to effectively communicate preferences and choices about care and activities both at the start of their time with Winter Growth and on an ongoing basis.

Winter Growth has given much thought to the physical building. Instead of a sterile environment we wanted to create a feeling that you were visiting a friend for the day. For those with anxiety due to their illness, this feeling of visiting a home instead of an institution has made adjustment to the setting easier. With most of our clients suffering from some degree of dementia, the environment needs to be secure with locked entrance doors. To offset this inability to leave the building alone, however, our buildings have continuous hallways so that clients can walk without reaching a dead end. Along the way are several alcoves with chairs, some with puzzles or other items that may interest the walker. Our enclosed courtyards are also easily accessible by all so even those with severe dementia have the ability to wander outside on their own. The hallways are wide and lined with handrails for those with difficulty walking and those in wheelchairs have ample space to move around. The building itself is all on one level to allow for safe movement for all and the doorways are extra wide to allow for easy access between rooms.
Winter Growth has a fleet of vehicles that include wheelchair accessible vans. Our door-to-door service allows those requiring transportation to our programs to participate without navigating the more complicated or prohibitively expensive transportation services offered in the county.

To effectively complement Winter Growth's skilled nursing staff, our paraprofessional providers receive advanced training on the various illnesses that our clients experience. Both weekly meetings and monthly trainings focus on how staff can best provide services to the diverse population we serve. Staff have learned how to de-escalate anxious or even angry clients whose brain functioning has been compromised by dementia. We have brought in speakers to help staff members understand the impact of different mental health issues, such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia; on a client's experience at the center; and staff applies this knowledge when dealing directly with clients and when planning activities for our day program

When staff identifies areas in which procedural modifications would have beneficial impacts, staff assesses the degree of difficulty in implementing the proposed changes, any current obstacles to the suggested changes, and a realistic timeline for the changes to occur. Each change made will be reviewed following the first two months of implementation; with staff meeting to discuss any unanticipated problems associated with the new procedure and to determine if adjustments need to be made to ensure that the modification is sustainable and beneficial to Winter Growth's clients. During the following four months, any further issues that arise from the procedural modification will be addressed to ensure that the desired impact is achievable. After six months, staff will again meet to review the progress achieved in implementing the revised procedure. Success will be determined if, at the nine month mark, no additional issues have arisen from the implementation of the new procedure; and the desired impact has been achieved.

Each weekday our residents and daycare clients have the opportunity to participate in a 45-minute exercise class. Over the years we have seen our clients maintain strength and balance which has a direct impact on decreasing the probability of falling. Daily brain fitness activities are incorporated into the programs to stimulate memory. Studies have shown that keeping both physically and mentally active can slow the rate of mental decline; and clients' family members have repeatedly confirmed that their loved one's memory issues have been noticeably impacted by Winter Growth's programming.

How We Listen

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

Source: Self-reported by organization

the feedback loop
check_box We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
check_box We shared information about our current feedback practices.
How is the organization collecting feedback?
We regularly collect feedback through: electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), paper surveys.
How is the organization using feedback?
We use feedback to: to identify and remedy poor client service experiences, to identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, to make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, to inform the development of new programs/projects, to strengthen relationships with the people we serve.
With whom is the organization sharing feedback?
We share feedback with: our staff.
What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?
It is difficult to: it is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback.
What significant change resulted from feedback
Altered menu offerings.

External Reviews

Photos

Financials

WINTER GROWTH INC

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

Need more info?

FREE: Gain immediate access to the following:

  • Address, phone, website and contact information
  • Forms 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016
  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

See what's included

Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

Not Applicable

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

Not Applicable

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

Not Applicable

Organizational Demographics

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? This organization has voluntarily shared information to answer this important question and to support sector-wide learning. GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 12/10/2019

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & Ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender Identity
Female, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual Orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability Status
Person without a disability

Race & Ethnicity

Gender Identity

Sexual Orientation

Disability

Equity Strategies

Last updated: 12/10/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data

done
We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.

Policies and processes

done
We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.