PLATINUM2024

FCNL EDUCATION FUND

aka Friends Committee on National Legislation   |   Washington, DC   |  https://www.fcnl.org/about/fcnl-education-fund

Mission

We seek a world free of war and the threat of war. We seek a society with equity and justice for all. We seek a community where every person's potential may be fulfilled. We seek an earth restored. The FCNL Education Fund is a national nonpartisan Quaker organization that promotes civic engagement through education and training to advance peace, justice, opportunity, and environmental stewardship. Established in 1982, the FCNL Education Fund is a 501(c)3 organization that works in concert with the Friends Committee on National Legislation, a 501(c)4 Quaker nonprofit.

Ruling year info

1982

General Secretary

Bridget Moix

Main address

245 Second St NE

Washington, DC 20002 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1254489

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our elected officials need constituents and advocates who will encourage, teach, appreciate, and hold them accountable to work for the common good. The FCNL Education Fund educates and encourages people to become and remain engaged in the civic and democratic processes that are the foundation of the United States. We provide research, content and knowledge to equip people who are concerned about building peace, establishing justice, and creating a sustainable planet to engage in advocacy and organizing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program Name: Hill Program - Foreign Policy

Our foreign policy work focuses on opposing war and militarism, protecting human rights, supporting nuclear disarmament, promoting the peaceful prevention of deadly conflict through diplomacy and alternatives to the military, and supporting a ban on landmines.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents
Victims of conflict and war

Our domestic policy work includes promoting programs that address human needs, gun violence, Native American rights, migration justice, global climate change, election integrity, economic justice, and mass incarceration.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents
Indigenous peoples
Economically disadvantaged people
Immigrants and migrants

This program builds and supports a nationwide grassroots network of advocates. We empower and train ordinary people to become engaged citizen advocates who connect with the public media, meet with editorial boards, and develop lasting relationships with their members of Congress via non-partisan advocacy.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents
Activists
Ethnic and racial groups
Religious groups

Our major publications include periodicals such as our Washington Newsletter. We also publish booklets and pamphlets and use email to distribute information on the Federal Budget, Peaceful Prevention of Deadly Conflict, Native American issues, climate change and energy issues, Iraq, Iran and the Middle East, landmines and cluster bombs, and ways for young adults to engage in the political process.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Adolescents
Activists

Effective communications are key to transforming national policy discourse. FCNL is recognized for its integrity, expert staff, and Quaker grounding of its work. This recognition gives FCNL a voice to challenge and change the conventional narratives that guide federal policy-making. FCNL can infuse a clear and distinctive moral, faith-based, and Quaker voice into its educational and advocacy efforts to increase the visibility and reach of the organization and its vision of a just society and a peaceful planet to Friends, Congress, donors, collation partners, advocates, and the mass media.

Population(s) Served
Religious groups
Adults
Adolescents

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Immigrants and migrants

Related Program

Media, Marketing, and Communications

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Story placements measured by media impressions (i.e. the number of people who read, saw, or heard about us and our stories). Figures reflect both FCNL Education Fund and affiliated organization FCNL.

Number of individuals attending community events or trainings

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Adolescents, Religious groups, Activists

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This is defined as the total number of constituents who participated in advocacy training programs and events.

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The FCNL Education Fund’s education, outreach, and community building programs are designed to sustain, strengthen, and grow our nationwide network of citizen advocates. Active engagement in civic life is foundational to Quaker faith and practice, as is the commitment to relationship-building and mutual respect. We seek to help individuals and communities across the country (regardless of political, ideological, or spiritual holdings) to recognize their power and the crucial role they play in our democracy by sharing their voices, using media to reinforce their messages, and building and maintaining constructive relationships with policymakers. The FCNL Education Fund places a particular emphasis on diversity and young adult training to lift more voices that are needed to carry on this important work.

Young Adult Training: One of the distinguishing marks of our advocacy is that we are in it for the long game. The power and passion of young adults is what will carry our work for peace and equity forward to the future. Our extensive Young Adult Program includes:
• The Advocacy Corps is a 9 month-long program that pays young adults a stipend to organize in their local communities. Advocacy Corps organizers connect activists and leaders with their members of Congress to affect big, long-term change. During the course of this program, participants learn critical organizing skills and put them into practice with hands-on leadership experience.
• Spring Lobby Weekend – A yearly event in Washington, DC for hundreds of students, recent graduates, and other young adults that provides intensive advocacy training and face-to-face advocacy visits with their congressional representatives.
• Young Fellows – The Young Fellows program is full-time for 11 months and pays a salary at the Washington, DC living wage standard with benefits. Fellows work closely with FCNL lobbyists and other senior staff, gaining first-hand knowledge of advocacy, research, communications, and outreach.

Coalition Building: As a prominent voice and trusted resource in the faith-based advocacy community known for our policy expertise and ability to work with policymakers across the political aisle, the FCNL Education Fund serves as the connective tissue between federal decisionmakers and coalition partners. These partners are fellow advocacy and direct service organizations (secular and faith-based), including Circle of Protection and the Washington Interfaith Staff Community, two prominent coalitions that comprise national religious bodies and organizations representing more than 100 million Americans of diverse faiths. We also work within the (secular) Coalition for Human Needs, an alliance of 100 national organizations working to address the interconnected needs of those experiencing poverty.

Quaker Engagement: The Quaker community in the U.S. is known for its historic commitment to peace and social justice. Because there is no centralized Quaker leadership, Friends’ advocacy works locally and regionally through hundreds of Quaker meetings and churches. The FCNL Education Fund acts as a national umbrella to harness and engage the power of this community.

Strategic Advocacy: The FCNL Education Fund provides the training future advocates need to take the next step to partner with our sister organization (Friends Committee on National Legislation) to meet directly with lawmakers. To build their advocacy skills and deepen their civic engagement, we provide experiential programming grounded in storytelling, active listening, respect, and community. Constituents are trained in nonpartisan advocacy; in-depth policy analysis; leveraging media as an advocacy tool; personalizing abstract policy decisions; and mobilizing community solidarity.

Our multi-faceted approach draws on the expertise of our staff in Washington, DC, the commitment and passion of people around the country in our advocacy network, and the relationships we cultivate with executive branch officials and community leaders.

We work with coalitions, community leaders, and constituents to advocate for peace, justice, and a sustainable planet. Our staff and volunteers help thousands of people find the courage, the resilience, and the mutual support to engage with members of Congress even in cases where they don’t agree.

Building community and advocacy from a place of faith is about remaining grounded and not being riled or thrown off track by the response of the government official. It is not about twisting the facts or about elaborate arguments. Engaging in this work means presenting accurate research as fully as possible to give the public as well as public officials access to information not readily available to them otherwise. It is not about promoting self-interest but about advancing government policy to move toward a more powerful, just and whole world.

Accomplishments:
Young Adult Programming:
We hosted our first-ever hybrid Spring Lobby Weekend in March 2022, with 403 attending in-person and 70 people attending programming virtually. Young Adults from 40 states learned from experts and each other and received training to advocate for citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Our attendee rate for those identifying as Latinx rose from 8% to 29%. Advocacy Corps organizers have continued to bring members of their communities around the country together to advocate for the Environmental Justice for All Act. One organizer has already reached their goal of bringing in 30 people, four organizers have brought in over 20 people, and three other organizers have brought in 15 or more people. Our paid Summer Internships reverted back to in-person programming, allowing much more face-to-face interaction with full-time staff.

Quaker Engagement:
We re-launched our Visiting Friends Program through which Quakers who work closely with the FCNL Education Fund visit Friends communities across the country to bring them closer to our work. There is a long Quaker tradition of “intervisitation” which the Covid pandemic severely impacted but, at the same time, opened the door to the opportunity of virtual visits.

Coalition-Building:
FCNL Education Fund continued to serve as the connective tissue between federal decision-makers and coalition partners. With our faith-based partners we worked to ensure that Afghans arriving in the United States on Humanitarian Parole have access to the same resettlement services traditionally reserved for refugees resettling through the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program—including medical and housing assistance, English-language classes, and job training. By focusing our efforts on uplifting humane immigration policies that welcome refugees with dignity, we are helping to improve U.S. welcoming culture. We look forward to our continued work with Afghan, Haitian, and Ukrainian populations who are seeking safety in the United States, as well as those resettling through the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program.

Strategic Advocacy:
The Covid pandemic clearly exposed the huge holes in our social safety net, creating a unique opportunity to highlight some of the little-known but long-lived FCNL Education Fund priorities. Topping this list is the permanent expansion of the federal Child Tax Credit, a critical federal-level program that proven to significantly reduce childhood poverty in the U.S. Capitalizing on the moment, we focused our most recent Annual Meeting on training our constituents to become champions in their communities for the CTC. More than 800 attendees participated in deep dive workshops and advocacy skills training on this important issue.

What’s next: The FCNL Education Fund assumed oversight of Friends Place on Capitol Hill, a Washington, DC gathering place created by Quakers in 1966. We will offer programs and training on civic engagement for young adults.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

FCNL EDUCATION FUND
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

FCNL EDUCATION FUND

Board of directors
as of 03/27/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Michael Fuson

Michael Fuson

Lake Erie Yearly Meeting

Mary Lou Hatcher

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting

Abigail Adams

New Englad Yearly Meeting

Mark Donovan

At-Large Member

Ernie Buscemi

New York Yearly Meeting

to be named to be named

to be named

Jane Hiles

Southern Appalachian Yearly Meeting

Rebecca Bergus

Iowa Yearly Meeting - Conservative

Michael Snarr

Wilmington Yearly Meeting

Deborah Hejl

Philadelphia Yearly Meeting

Bridget Moix

FCNL Education Fund General Secretary

Genie Stowers

Pacific Yearly Meeting

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/19/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 08/19/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.