PLATINUM2023

Sisters of Mary World Villages for Children

Helping children break free from poverty.

aka World Villages for Children   |   Lanham, MD   |  www.worldvillages.org

Mission

The Sisters of Mary World Villages for Children practices charity to the poor in the name of Christ Jesus by helping children break free from a life of poverty.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Mr. David Cook

Main address

4200 Parliament Place Suite 230

Lanham, MD 20706 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1440944

NTEE code info

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (B12)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (P12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is not required to file an annual return with the IRS because it is a religious organization.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Extreme poverty, particularly among children, remains a global plague today. Those who are living in severe poverty are often victims of what economists call the “poverty trap" which describes a situation in which individuals are stuck in severe deprivation over long periods of time, and there is nothing they can do by themselves to escape their plight. The idea is simple: those who begin their life in poverty are very likely to remain in poverty for their entire lifetime unless they receive outside help. A situation often exacerbated by a “perverse equilibrium" characterized by low income and low nutrition: poor nutrition then becomes both the cause and consequence of low income. Knowing that schooling is one of the strongest predictors of economic well-being, the charitable programs of the Sisters of Mary aim to break the cycle of poverty described above on a large scale by making available a free education including vocational training to more than 21,000 poor children every year.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Mexico, Guadalajara. Annual cost to care for and educate 1 child in our Boystown.

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 2,000 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 3,500 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 780 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 700 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 1,000 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 1,000 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 2,200 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Includes cost of food, shelter, personal hygiene, education, vocational training, and associated staff and facilities.
Average cost per student.
Total capacity 3,500 students.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total dollar amount of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average number of dollars received per donor

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of stories successfully placed in the media

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children who have access to education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Less students were able to be recruited in 2020 due to pandemic restrictions. Recruitment has rebounded in 2021.

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, People of African descent, People of Asian descent, People of Latin American descent, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

World Villages for Children support the charitable programs of the Sisters of Mary with the following goals:
•relieve the poverty, hardship and distress suffered by children throughout the world through the establishment and maintenance of children's villages for children who are without parents or guardians or who, as a result of severe poverty, are in need of food, accommodation and care.
• provide education and vocational training to children living in poverty throughout the world.
• relieve the poverty, hardship and distress suffered by adults and children throughout the world by the provision of medical and welfare services and the provision of shelter for the homeless.
• educate public on the welfare of children and adults living in poverty throughout the world and the advancement of religion in all or any of the charitable works undertaken.
• promote charitable objects concerned with the welfare of children and adults suffering from poverty, hardship, sickness and distress.

In supporting the Sisters of Mary's charitable programs, World Villages for Children helps provide an education to the poorest of the poor. Our programs fully invest and believe better education is a key to breaking the poverty cycle. Our students learn practical skills in various subjects, including vocational training tailored to the local economy to guarantee immediate employment following graduation. In turn, graduates are then able to provide support to their own families and communities, which allows access to better healthcare and opportunities. By providing a quality education that leads to sustainable employment, and supporting them holistically in a community setting, we are able to lift entire communities out of poverty–for good. To achieve these proven poverty-reducing results, our programs have identified certain key factors necessary for our students' success: proper health, good nutrition, comfortable school accommodations and professional teaching staff and supplies.

The Sisters of Mary have built world-class schools in six countries across two continents, with a capacity to educate more than 21,000 children annually. Each school is fully-equipped with modern teaching facilities, a dedicated group of teachers, and ample space for recreation including soccer fields, basketball courts and swimming pools. Following graduation, students benefit from the long-standing and deep relationships with local employers that the Sisters of Mary have carefully nurtured over many years to assists new graduates in finding employment. And for those graduates with the desire and aptitude to pursue additional learning opportunities, assistance is given in finding suitable university courses. Sisters of Mary schools represent one of the most efficient and effective poverty reduction programs to be found anywhere in the world, delivering their life changing services and programs at an annual cost of just $1,496 on average per student.

Today, World Villages for Children is helping support 14 schools in 7 countries - in the Philippines, South Korea, Mexico, Guatemala, Brazil and Honduras. Since the beginning of our programs in the 1960's, more than 170,000 graduates have received a quality education at no cost to their families. We are anxious to see this number soar as we continue to break the cycle of poverty one child, one family at a time. Expansion plan are being considered to open a new program and lift even more children out of extreme poverty. We are relying on the generous contributions of our benefactors to make this dream a reality.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback

Financials

Sisters of Mary World Villages for Children
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Sisters of Mary World Villages for Children

Board of directors
as of 06/08/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Sr Maria Cho

The Sisters of Mary

Elena Belarmino

The Sisters of Mary

Margie Cheong

The Sisters of Mary

Stephen Peroutka

Tom Sullivan

Marney Costello

John Clegg

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/8/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Asian/Asian American
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/02/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.