PLATINUM2024

THE SENTENCING PROJECT

Research and Advocacy for Reform

Washington, DC   |  www.sentencingproject.org

Mission

The Sentencing Project advocates for effective and humane responses to crime that minimize imprisonment and criminalization of youth and adults by promoting racial, ethnic, economic, and gender justice.

Ruling year info

1987

Executive Director

Kara Gotsch

Main address

1705 DeSales St., NW 8th floor

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1472546

NTEE code info

Civil Rights, Social Action, and Advocacy N.E.C. (R99)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The US is the world's leader in incarceration. Today, there are nearly two million people in the nation’s prisons and jails—a 500% increase over the last 40 years. Increasingly punitive changes in sentencing laws and policies, not crime rates, explain most of this increase, despite evidence that mass incarceration is not an effective means of achieving public safety. The biased assumptions of legal system actors unfairly influence outcomes for people enmeshed in the criminal legal system. Disparities mount as individuals progress through the system, from the initial point of arrest to the final point of imprisonment. In the United States, Black men are nearly five times as likely to be incarcerated as white men. The collateral consequences of mass incarceration disproportionately harm communities of color now and for generations to come. High levels of imprisonment in communities cause high crime rates and neighborhood deterioration, thus fueling the cycle of mass incarceration.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Research, policy analysis, advocacy and communication for criminal justice reform

Research, advocacy and public education for criminal justice reform

Population(s) Served
Adults
Incarcerated people
Children and youth
At-risk youth
Victims of crime and abuse

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of media citations of advocate research or products

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people, Activists, Academics

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of invitations for advocates to speak as experts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Academics, Activists, Incarcerated people

Related Program

Research, policy analysis, advocacy and communication for criminal justice reform

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of research or policy analysis products developed, e.g., reports, briefs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people, Academics, Activists

Related Program

Research, policy analysis, advocacy and communication for criminal justice reform

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of overall donors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Research, policy analysis, advocacy and communication for criminal justice reform

Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people, Academics, Activists

Related Program

Research, policy analysis, advocacy and communication for criminal justice reform

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people, Academics, Activists

Related Program

Research, policy analysis, advocacy and communication for criminal justice reform

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Incarcerated people, Academics, Activists

Related Program

Research, policy analysis, advocacy and communication for criminal justice reform

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Mission: The Sentencing Project advocates for effective and humane responses to crime that minimize imprisonment and criminalization of youth and adults by promoting racial, ethnic, economic, and gender justice.

Our policy priorities envision the full inclusion in society of people with criminal records and an end to extreme punishments. Our aim is to center the leadership, voices, vision, and experience of those directly affected by mass incarceration to make the rationale for systemic change vivid, credible and compelling.

Strategic priorities:
Ending extreme sentences: Roll back the extreme punishment paradigm in the U.S. that fuels mass incarceration, including advocating for a cap on punishments for serious offenses at 20 years and a universal “second look” review process for all people who are incarcerated within a maximum of 10 years of imprisonment.
Expanding voting rights: Ensure universal suffrage for the millions of justice-involved citizens through national, state, and local campaign efforts focused on ending disenfranchisement and expanding voting rights to citizens with felony convictions and citizens detained in jails and youth justice facilities.
Promoting youth justice: Safeguard youth from the ravages of the adult criminal legal system and push for alternatives to youth involvement in the adult and youth justice systems.

1. Publish cutting edge research to help reimagine the criminal legal system: We’re identifying the most pressing problems and providing evidence-based solutions for reform. We aim to increase the impact of our already influential reports, briefs, and fact sheets, which receive an average of over 1,100 media mentions annually. Further public awareness is built through the more than 75 public events, policy hearings, and professional convenings our staff participate in each year.

2. Conduct persuasive public education campaigns: We craft and promote data-driven narratives around public safety and alternatives to extreme punishment to win support for transformative change.

3. Conduct nationwide advocacy to connect work on the ground with policy changes at the national level: Through national leadership, technical assistance, advocacy training and microgrant support, we are building the capacity of the movement and empowering those closest to the issues to have a seat at the table.

4. Prioritize the issues that matter most: We are focused on promoting reform and racial justice in the policy areas that currently undermine the power of communities of color and draw Black and Brown community members into the criminal legal system.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

THE SENTENCING PROJECT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

THE SENTENCING PROJECT

Board of directors
as of 02/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Henderson Hill

American Civil Liberties Union

Term: 2022 - 2024

Angela Davis

American University Washington College of Law

Mark MacDougall

Schertler Onorato Mead & Sears LLP

Ashley McSwain

New Hope Housing

Ebony Underwood

We Got Us Now

Henderson Hill

American Civil Liberties Union

Santha Sonenberg

Criminal Defense Attorney and Mitigation Specialist

Jason Hernandez

Get Clemency Now

Marc M. Howard

Georgetown University

Cynthia Jones

American University Washington College of Law

Marc Mauer

The Sentencing Project (former Executive Director)

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/29/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/29/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.