Disabled American Veterans Charitable Service Trust, Inc.

aka DAV (Disabled American Veterans) Charitable Service Trust (Trust)   |   Erlanger, KY   |  www.cst.dav.org

Mission

Organized in 1986, the DAV (Disabled American Veterans) Charitable Service Trust is dedicated to one single purpose: empowering veterans to lead high-quality lives with respect and dignity. In an effort to fulfill that purpose, the Trust awards grants to nonprofit organizations with programs that benefit service members of every era. Through financial assistance grants, the Trust carries out its mission by supporting: programs ensuring quality health care for veterans; assistance to veterans suffering from PTSD, TBI, military sexual trauma, substance-abuse issues and related conditions; programs enhancing mobility for veterans with amputations, spinal cord injuries and other physical afflictions; and additional initiatives addressing the needs of veterans and caregivers or families.

Ruling year info

1987

President

Mr. Richard E. Marbes

Main address

860 Dolwick Dr.

Erlanger, KY 41018 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1521276

NTEE code info

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The DAV Charitable Service Trust aims to reconnect veterans with new possibilities and address the most challenging hurdles that stand between them and their maximum potential as productive members of society. The programs that benefit from the Trust address the wide range of physical and psychological barriers that impact a veterans' quality of life. The Trust identifies and assists initiatives that do things such as enhance research and mobility for veterans who've lost limbs or suffered spinal cord injuries, help aging veterans enjoy a sense of dignity and peace, provide shelter to homeless veterans and give them a path toward a fulfilled life and give caregivers and families of veterans the tools and resources needed to lead sustainable and enriched lives. The Trust carefully evaluates and addresses the most vital needs of ill and injured veterans and their families while empowering them to maximize their quality of life.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Human Services

DAV leaders formed the Trust in 1986 to advance programs and services that cater to the nation’s veterans as well as their caregivers and families. By supporting the work of the charitable organizations that offer these services, the Trust plays an essential role in ensuring that America fulfills its promises to those who make such significant sacrifices for national safety and security. It is critical that these efforts include recognition and respite for the families and/or caregivers involved.

To carry out its responsibility of empowering veterans to lead high quality lives with respect and dignity, the DAV (Disabled American Veterans) Charitable Service Trust supports the following:

• programs ensuring quality health care for veterans;
• assistance to veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI),
military sexual trauma (MST), substance-abuse issues and related or co-occurring conditions;
• programs enhancing mobility for veterans with amputations, spinal cord injuries and other physical
afflictions; and
• additional initiatives for addressing the needs of veterans and caregivers or families from each era of
conflict.

To date, funded programs and projects aid in providing a number of necessities to veteran clients and/or their families in each service region. Grants are typically distributed to offer:

• food, shelter and other necessary items for homeless or at-risk veterans and their families;
• mobility items or other assistance specific to veterans with blindness, vision loss, hearing loss or
amputations;
• qualified evidence-based therapeutic or recreational activities for veterans and/or their families;
• physical and psychological rehabilitation projects;
• education, training and career readiness; and
• other forms of support as appropriate for short- or long-term relief for veterans, caregivers and/or their families.

The Trust continues to seek effective ways to improve the lives of ill and injured veterans and their families.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Military personnel

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2017

Charity Navigator 2018

Charity Navigator 2019

Charity Navigator 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of grants awarded

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Caregivers, Families, Veterans

Related Program

Human Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Represents the total number of grants awarded for the given period. Grant awards are based upon application quality, program service/purpose, financial need/stability and impact on veterans.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Through the DAV Charitable Service Trust, charitable organizations receive the financial support needed to build capacity, expand on services provided, and ultimately, increase the impact made on countless veterans and/or military families as they navigate the challenges of life after combat.

While the nature of funded programs vary significantly from year to year, many of the supported initiatives provide the services needed to stabilize homeless at-risk veterans struggling to establish suitable employment and/or housing, in addition to challenges associated with declining physical or psychological health.

Grants have been awarded to support a range of services, including but not limited to service dogs, adaptive segways, and vision- or hearing- related devices for those with physical limitations; transitional shelter and food for homeless and at-risk veterans; a functioning vehicle or bus tokens for veterans without transportation; life skills and career training for those seeking employment; and alternative means of therapy through creative writing, music lessons, dancing, and recreational events for veterans interested in rehabilitating while also learning a new skill.

Recognizing that veterans of all backgrounds can benefit from services catered to their unique experiences with the military, the DAV (Disabled American Veterans) Charitable Service Trust partners with an increasingly large number of charitable organizations to ensure that veterans of both the aging and newly returned eras; rural and urban regions; and other distinctions have access to programming for enrichment. In doing so, the Trust has maintained a single, primary program since its initiation: the DAV Charitable Service Trust Grant Program.

Each year, thousands of ill and injured veterans, their families, and/or caregivers benefit from the funds distributed through the initiative. During its most recently completed fiscal year, the DAV (Disabled American Veterans) Charitable Service Trust provided roughly $7.2 million in grants for direct support to our nation's sick and wounded heroes. Notably, in 2020, a remarkable 97 cents of every dollar contributed to the Trust was used to support these efforts.

Though the Trust is able to support a growing number of charitable programs and services each year, a number of funding requests are received that are not awarded favorably. The Trust takes care to ensure every project that receives support is operating in a financially stable, well-established, and evidence-based way. Each application is reviewed for completion and analyzed for eligibility, appropriateness, organizational stability, program design, and program implementation, among other areas. Further, successful requests are prompted within the contractual agreement to meet periodic accountability measures to ensure that the positive stance of the organization and program are maintained and use of the Trust's funds align with the restricted purpose identified by the Trust's Board of Directors.

Undoubtedly, the DAV (Disabled American Veterans) Charitable Service Trust has managed generous gifts with ongoing dedication and controlled spending. As evidence of its sound fiscal management, approximately 97 cents out of every dollar went directly to support programs and services for veterans and their families in 2020. The Trust also boasted more than $39 million in Net Assets which demonstrates its strong financial position. Further, the Trust recently received a perfect score from Charity Navigator for the second straight year and earned the coveted 4-star rating for "sound fiscal management and commitment to accountability and transparency" for the 16th time since first being evaluated in 2002. This speaks volumes about the Trust's careful and efficient stewardship of donated funds.

The DAV (Disabled American Veterans) Charitable Service Trust has administered a nation-wide grant program to ensure that other not-for-profit entities have the resources to provide a number of services and programs for ill and injured veterans and their families. As a well-known grantmaker to an increasing volume of recipients each year, the Trust has been able to support programs that meet a wide variety of needs among the military community.

Notably, a full 97% of our 2020 total expenses went directly to service programs for our ill and injured veterans and only 3% was expended for fundraising and administrative costs. Such responsible management is crucial in fulfilling our mission of empowering veterans to lead high quality lives with respect and dignity.

The Trust will continue to proactively search for new and innovative ways to serve veterans, their family members, and caregivers.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The DAV Charitable Service Trust (Trust) serves veterans, their caregivers and families of every era. More specifically, the Trust aims to assist veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder; traumatic brain injury; military sexual trauma; substance use disorders; amputations; spinal cord injuries; and other physical and psychological afflictions. The Trust also focuses on addressing the needs of caregivers and/or their family members. Additionally, through financial assistance grants, the Trust enables nonprofit organizations to sustain quality programming to millions of veterans and dependents each year.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    The DAV Charitable Service Trust carefully evaluates and addresses the most vital needs of wounded, ill and injured veterans and their families and continually seeks ways to enhance program delivery for those we serve. Through feedback from various sources, the Trust observed a growing and emergent need to support programs delivering critical services to veterans impacted by the pandemic. In response to this unprecedented need, the Trust gave priority consideration to organizations providing food, shelter, crisis intervention, disaster relief, and transportation to/from medical appointments. Additionally, a more efficient electronic application system was implemented to allow for expedited review processes and streamlined communication among our grant award recipients.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our board,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    By seeking feedback from those we serve, the Trust is able to accommodate and adapt to the ever changing needs of veterans, their caregivers and families. Staying connected with veterans, donors, and grant applicants/recipients allows for additional growth in critical programs areas; more collaboration and strong partnerships; increased public awareness; and, most importantly, helps veterans connect with new possibilities as they address the most challenging hurdles between them and their maximum potential.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Disabled American Veterans Charitable Service Trust, Inc.
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Disabled American Veterans Charitable Service Trust, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 10/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Richard Marbes

DAV

Term: 2019 - 2021


Board co-chair

Mr. J. Marc Burgess

DAV

Term: 2019 - 2021

Richard Marbes

DAV

David Tannenbaum

DAV

Stephen Whitehead

DAV

Danny Oliver

DAV

Denice Williams

DAV

J. Marc Burgess

DAV

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/24/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person with a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability