PLATINUM2024

Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies Inc.

aka ICJS   |   Baltimore, MD   |  https://icjs.org/

Mission

To dismantle religious bias and bigotry, ICJS builds learning communities where religious difference is a powerful force for good.

Ruling year info

1988

Executive Director and Roman Catholic Scholar

Heather Miller Rubens Ph.D.

Main address

956 Dulaney Valley Road

Baltimore, MD 21204 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies

EIN

52-1531016

NTEE code info

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Religious bigotry and prejudice have led to acts of violence and intimidation around the world. At the core of such prejudice and bigotry is misunderstanding caused by religious illiteracy and indifference. While we may live in more diverse communities, our lack of understanding about different religions and cultures continues to cause harm. ICJS is committed to disarming religious hatred through education.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Interreligious Education

At ICJS, we envision a society where dialogue replaces division, friendship overcomes fear, and education eradicates ignorance.Religious difference has always been integral to life in the United States. George Washington famously wrote (in a 1790 letter to a synagogue) that the new country should aim to build a society that gives to religious bigotry no sanction and to religious persecution no assistance. At ICJS, we continue to build a society without bigotry, knowing that mere “toleration” of religious difference is not enough. We offer opportunities for people of many faiths or no faith to encounter one another in study and dialogue to forge shared understanding, resulting in creative collaborations and life-giving connections.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Net promoter score

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Interreligious Education

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

(survey and feedback loop created with support from Listen for Good, a program of the Fund for Shared Insight). 21/22 - Teachers Fellowship 23 - Avg. of all courses

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The 2021 Board-approved Strategic Framework names five core goals:
1. Increase interreligious literacy. Equip our learning communities with knowledge about the religious traditions, teachings, practices, and history of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam for interreligious understanding and dialogue.
2. Build resilient interreligious networks. Facilitate strong relationships among people with diverse religious and nonreligious identities who will work against religious bias and bigotry and work together for the common good.
3. Advance the academic field of Interreligious and Interfaith Studies. Be a leader in academic discourse and publishing on core concepts and principles in this emerging field
4. Inspire the public to champion religious pluralism. Act as a thought leader to help the American public value religious difference.
5. Foster a culture of equity and inclusion for our interreligious work. Build and increase trust, support, and involvement of those marginalized in interreligious spaces so that everyone is included in our work.

- Expand educational programs that promote understanding of one’s own religious tradition and sacred texts, other religious traditions and sacred texts, and the history and practices of religious bigotry (e.g., Islamophobia and Antisemitism) that continue to permeate religious communities and society
- Use the Fellowship model to effectively reach into community sectors (e.g., education, nonprofit, congregations)
Cultivate strategic partnerships with secular, religious, and interreligious institutions;
- Train a diverse pipeline of interreligious leaders.
Establish the Silber-Obrecht Endowed Lectureship as the premier lecture in the field of Interreligious and Interfaith Studies;
- Equip faculty from diverse institutions (e.g., colleges, universities, seminaries) to develop interreligious literacy in their courses and seminars;
- Provide insight on interreligious issues through commentaries in local and national press;
- Recognizing where ICJS has an opportunity for growth and improvement, build and develop ICJS relationships with Muslims, people of color, and women;

As an independent organization, not connected to any specific religious or academic institutions, ICJS is in a unique position to promote religious diversity and inclusion. Because ICJS believes that the most effective interreligious learning is grounded in local relationships, we use the diverse Greater Baltimore Region to build models of robust interreligious learning and community. However, much of our programming is now offered online and reaches a global audience.

ICJS is home to four resident scholars who bring their academic and theological understanding to bear on ICJS’s work in the community. These scholars partner with four program directors who craft programming that reflects the diversity of lived religion today.

Since its founding in 1987 as the Institute for Christian and Jewish Studies, ICJS has focused on disarming religious hatred through education. In 2013, ICJS expanded the mission to include Islam. In 2015, ICJS developed programs to reach deeper into the divided community, equipping community leaders (“Justice Leaders”) and secondary teachers to be interreligious leaders in the public square.

In 2021, ICJS launched a new Congregational Program to bring religious and lay leaders from Muslim, Jewish and Christian congregations in the Greater Baltimore region to study and dialogue together.

ICJS is committed to five central Values: Difference, Equity, Dialogue, Learning, and Community. These values highlight how ICJS differs from other interreligious organizations in that it welcomes and embraces differences, rather than merely focusing on finding commonalities.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback

Financials

Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Institute for Islamic, Christian, and Jewish Studies Inc.

Board of directors
as of 03/05/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Lee Sherman

Anthony Day

Alan Edelman

Robert Hallock

Dr. Tazeen Hashmi

Kristen Kinkopf

Rev. Dr. Brent Laytham

Most Rev. Denis J. Madden

Larry Moscow

Anna-Maria Gonzalez Palmer

Qaisar Shareef

Lee Sherman

Arun Subhas

Dr. Omar Zalatimo

Rev. Scott Adams

Nancy Bryant

Lisa Budlow

Megan Casey

Imam Tariq Najee-ullah

Farah Shakour-Bridges

Lisa Akchin

Adnan Hyder

Irfan Malik

Ajmel Quereshi

Rabbi Debi Wechsler

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/5/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data