PLATINUM2022

Institute for Women's Policy Research

A just future begins with bold ideas.

aka IWPR   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.iwpr.org

Mission

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research wins economic equity for all women and eliminate barriers to their full participation in society. As a leading national think tank, we build evidence to shape policies that grow women’s power and influence, close inequality gaps, and improve the economic well-being of families. A just future begins with bold ideas.

Notes from the nonprofit

What do we do? *Build knowledge & evidence to support economic policies that will significantly improve the economic security and well-being of women and families. *Champion compelling and fresh ideas and approaches to building women’s economic security, and power and influence in society. *Produce rigorous and relevant research to inform policy outcomes at the local, state and federal levels. *Make the connection between gender inequality & economic inequality in our society *Help grow women’s power and influence in society. How do we do it? IWPR produces original research and analysis that is relevant, timely and accessible on the economic reality of women’s lives. Our research helps drive change in public policy, in corporations, in homes, and in society.

Ruling year info

1988

President and CEO

C. Nicole Mason Ph. D

Main address

1200 18th Street NW, Suite 301

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1549572

NTEE code info

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Women's Rights (R24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

There are many problems that create pay inequities. Black women, on average, earn only 61.8 cents for every dollar earned by White men—a gender racial wage gap of 38.2 percent—but the size of that gap varies from state to state. The wage gap is smallest in the Aloha state (Hawaii), where Black women made just over 80 percent of White men’s earnings, and largest in the Pelican state (Louisiana), where Black women made a paltry 46.6 percent of White men’s earnings. Black women in the District of Columbia faced the biggest absolute annual earnings inequality, on average making $47,688 less per year in 2018 than White men. In 2020, Black women’s average gender wage gap translated into lower annual earnings of $23,652. That’s about the annual cost of infant care in Washington, DC or the cost of tuition to a public, four-year college for an out-of-state student.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Publications

Areas of investigation include: (1) Employment, Education, and Economic Change; (2) Poverty, Welfare, and Income Security; (3) Work and Family; (4) Health and Safety; (5) Democracy and Society. IWPR has two main tasks: to conduct policy-relevant research, and to be a bridge between elected officials and other decision-makers, activists, and the information they need to make decisions that help women become and remain self-sufficient.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Women and girls

(1) Economic, Security, Mobility and Equity (ESME); (2) Center for the Economics of Reproductive Health; (3) Race, Ethnicity, Gender and the Economy; (4) Research and Action Hub; (5) Status of Women; and (6) Student Parent Success Initiative.

IWPR has two main tasks: to conduct policy-relevant research, and to be a bridge between elected officials and other decision-makers, activists, and the information they need to make decisions that help women become and remain self-sufficient.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of grants and research funding awarded to the institution

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Families, Women and girls, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We win economic equity for all women and eliminate barriers to their full participation in society. As a leading national think tank, we build evidence to shape policies that grow women’s power and influence, close inequality gaps, and improve the economic well-being of families.

The Institute generates a steady supply of reliable research, analysis, and new ideas for and with its core audience of influential change agents who inhabit the interrelated worlds of academia, public policy, and the media. They include policymakers, advocates, researchers, journalists, foundation officers, and program developers and practitioners who serve women and their families, business and labor leaders, and other power brokers and opinion leaders. The Institute also seeks to time its research for maximum relevance and effectiveness.

As the premier think tank in the United States addressing policy through a gendered and intersectional lens, IWPR is unique in its ability to marshal social science research and bring it to bear on policy questions facing the nation. IWPR enjoys an established reputation for rigorous and reliable research that is also timely, accessible, and user friendly. IWPR translates complex issues into the dollars and cents figures that policymakers understand. IWPR's staff members have training in the fields of economics, sociology, psychology, theology, public policy, and women's studies enabling IWPR to develop multi-disciplinary approaches to research. IWPR staff members are not only skilled researchers but also able communicators, who work frequently with advocates, program designers, practitioners, philanthropists, and policymakers at all levels of government and regularly speak with journalists. IWPR's work and experts are cited in more than a thousand media sources each year.

IWPR's ressearch has contributed to improving women's lives, including:
• to safeguard and expand financial support for child care on college campuses.
• to strengthen pay equity protections for women in several cities and states.
• to support the work of advocates working in the states to promote policy agendas that meet the needs of women.
• cited in news articles that shape the conversations around #BlackLivesMatter, #Fightfor15, #EqualPayDay, #MeToo, and #TimesUp.
• contributed to new paid sick leave protections in ten states, DC, two counties, and thirty cities, and new paid family and medical leave protections in six states and DC.
As society adapts to the risks and opportunities posed by projected changes in the way people work, form relationships, and combine work and family, IWPR is adapting its own research to inspire public dialogue, shape policy, and improve the lives and opportunities of women of diverse backgrounds, circumstances, and experiences.

Financials

Institute for Women's Policy Research
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Institute for Women's Policy Research

Board of directors
as of 03/10/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Nadia Allaudin

Merrill Lynch Global Wealth Management

Term: 2022 - 2023

Martha Darling

Boeing (retired)

William M. Rodgers, III

Rutgers University

Marci B Sternheim

Sternheim Company

Sheila W Wellington

New York University

Hilary Doe

NationBuilder

Beth Grupp

Beth Grupp Associates

Mary Eschelbach Hansen

American University

Esmeralda O. Lyn

Worldwide Capital Partners LLC

Joan Marsh

AT&T

Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner

MomsRising

Elizabeth H. Shuler

AFL-CIO

Daisy Chin-Lor

Daisy Chin-Lor and Associates

Darrick Hamilton

Henry Cohen Professor of Economics and Urban Policy at the New School

Anne Mosle

Aspen Institute

Paula Sammons

W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Eve Rodsky

Author

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/10/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/10/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.