American Indian College Fund

Education is the Answer

Denver, CO   |  www.collegefund.org

Mission

The American Indian College Fund invests in Native students and tribal college education to transform lives and communities. We have one unwavering purpose – increasing the number of American Indians with college degrees. Currently, only 14% of American Indians have a college degree – less than half the national average. We intend to double our impact in the next five years. Join us, and help a student today.

Ruling year info

1989

President/CEO

Cheryl Crazy Bull

Main address

8333 Greenwood Blvd

Denver, CO 80221 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1573446

NTEE code info

Scholarships, Student Financial Aid, Awards (B82)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Rural (S32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Only 13% of American Indians have a bachelor's degree, less than half the national average. It is projected that by 2020, 65% of all jobs will require a post-secondary degree or certificate. Theses numbers do not add up for healthy, self-sustaining, and prosperous native communities.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Student Success Services

The College Fund is undertaking significant efforts to expand our scholar support services in an effort to better promote student success and career readiness. This program administers specialized programmatic services including internships, career advice, professional conference attendance, award banquets, and more. Additionally, we are committed to sharing information and resources with TCUs in order to increase local internship and career opportunities. The College Fund also continues to expand our Circle of Scholars Program, a network created to engage and support past and present scholars with the organization and our donors beyond their time as a scholarship recipient. The College Fund seeks to create a thriving alumni community where all members have the resources necessary to become successful and engaged citizens who are well-equipped to achieve their educational, professional, and personal goals.

Population(s) Served

This program is focused on strengthening early childhood educational opportunities for Native children and families. The American Indian College Fund, tribal colleges, and their respective tribal partners are leading the way by developing programs that address family engagement and incorporate Native language and culture, thus strengthening instructional quality and increasing young children's skill development. The impact of these funded programs includes increasing research-based practices, improving teacher education and training, and increasing opportunities for Native communities to shape educational access and opportunities from birth and beyond into higher education pathways. This initiative represents the breadth and scope of the College Fund's work toward ensuring a quality educational environment for American Indians.

Population(s) Served

Cultural preservation includes language, arts, and traditional knowledge. The American Indian College Fund partners with donors and the tribal colleges to ensure that this knowledge is not lost forever.

Population(s) Served

The American Indian College Fund awards scholarships to over 4,000 Native Americans annually. Approximately 13% of American Indians have a bachelor's degree which is half the national average. Through our scholarship support we help make college accessible. Through our support services we help make getting a degree a reality.

Population(s) Served

The American Indian College Fund supports 35 tribal colleges and universities in enhancing their abilities to support students. College Fund support includes funding for infrastructure, faculty development, curriculum development, research projects, and data collection and analysis to drive best practices in educational operations.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2010

Charity Navigator 2010

American Institute of Philanthropy 2010

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

We are determined to help more American Indian students complete their college degree. Our goal is to empower individuals and uplift communities through degree attainment and career readiness training. Through programming that supports Native people from their first day of preschool and continuing through their academic goals and career attainment, we are enhancing individuals' abilities to achieve success.

*Developing and enhancing educational programming for our sacred little ones that engages children, parents, elders and the community. *Working with high school students and families to help them see going to college as a viable option. Supporting them with navigating college applications and financial aid processes. Continuing to support them through their first year of college. *Providing financial support through scholarships and fellowships *Providing career exploration and training through internships *Providing tutoring and mentoring support *Supporting leadership development through various program opportunities *Providing faculty development and research grants *Supporting tribal college and university infrastructure and curriculum development and enhancement

The American Indian College Fund has over 28 years of experience in raising money and providing financial support to American Indian students and tribal colleges and universities. We have provided over 120,000 scholarships and currently serve over 4,000 students annually. We have the expertise and staffing to raise funds, develop programming, and directly support students. Our donor partners include foundations, corporations, and individuals and we raise approximately $25 million annually. Our programs include stewarding multi-million multi-year programs and hundreds of individual scholarship programs annually. We have expert teams dedicated to our key initiatives; scholarships, internships, faculty development, early childhood education, cultural preservation through the tribal colleges and universities, leadership development. and career readiness and mentoring. We are financial strong and adept. We have grown our endowment to over $50 million and consistently obtain unqualified audits. Transparency and integrity are core values. The American Indian College Fund is lead by a diverse group of Native and non-Native people who are driven by a common bond; we believe in our mission, in the individuals and communities we serve, and we believe education is the answer to empowering people and uplifting communities and society as a whole.

The American Indian College Fund has transitioned our programming from access to success. We have increased our direct student support from $5.4 million to $8.2 million in the last five years. We initiated internship programming two years ago supporting approximately 30 interns in year one and approximately 60 interns in year two. We began tracking graduates in fiscal year 2012-2013 and have identified over 5,200 scholarship recipients who have graduated since we began tracking this data. In fiscal year 2017-2018 we initiated a pilot program to implement and assess specific programming to enhance graduation results.

Financials

American Indian College Fund
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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American Indian College Fund

Board of directors
as of 8/14/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. David Yarlott

Little Big Horn College

Term: 2016 - 2018

Elmer Guy

Navajo Technical University

Kimberly Blanchard

Weil, Gotshal & Manges, LLP

Robert Martin

Institute of American Indian Arts

Bill Black

Retired - Comcast Foundation

Carole Falcon-Chandler

Aaniiih Nakoda College

Jim Davis

Turtle Mountain Community College

Cameron Geiger

WalMart Stores Inc.

David Yarlott

Little Big Horn College

Michael Purvis

The Blackstone Group

Justin Guillory

Northwest Indian College

Tom Brooks

AT&T External Affairs

Dawson Her Many Horses

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Jeff Fillerup

Rincon Law LLP

Lynn Rapp

Eagle Opportunity

Meredith Vaughan

Vladimir Jones

Debra Parrish

Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College

Robert Bible

College of the Muscogee Nation

Joseph Canfora

Merit Management Group

Cynthia LIndquist

Cankdeska Cikana Community College

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/07/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Native American/American Indian/Indigenous
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/07/2019

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.