THE AMERICAN PROSPECT

Ideas, Politics & Power

aka The Prospect   |   Washington, DC   |  https://prospect.org

Mission

An independent voice for liberal thought, The American Prospect is devoted to promoting informed discussion on public policy from a progressive perspective. In print quarterly and online daily, the Prospect covers the pressing social and economic issues of our time, addressing the necessary politics as well as the policy alternatives. In a media environment often characterized by sensationalism, misinformation and short-term thinking, the Prospect brings thoughtful and reliable analysis together with fresh reporting from around the country, featuring both distinguished authors and new voices. We incubate talent through our acclaimed Writing Fellowship program and full-time paid internship classes. We help to dispel myths, challenge conventional wisdom, and expand the dialogue.

Ruling year info

1989

Publisher

Ellen Meany

Executive Editor

David Dayen

Main address

1225 I St NW Ste 600 Suite 600

Washington, DC 20005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1617061

NTEE code info

Printing, Publishing (A33)

Media, Communications Organizations (A30)

Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis (A05)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The American Prospect is an independent journalism venture publishing stories in print and online from a progressive perspective. The magazine's motto is "Ideas, Politics & Power." Focusing on power within politics and policy, from Washington to the corporate boardroom, the Prospect sheds light on who has power, what they're doing with it, and explores ideas about how to bring power back to people who deserve it. The Prospect's scholarly, narrative articles and analyses are designed to inform and inspire Americans on public policy. The Prospect's Writing Fellowship and paid internship programs mentor and train up-and-coming independent journalists from diverse backgrounds.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The American Prospect Writing Fellowship

The American Prospect is committed to training a new and diverse generation of journalistic talent. The TAP Writing Fellowship cultivates young journalists through a structured two-year program of writing and professional development. Prospect writing fellowships are salaried, editorial staff positions that offer two years of intensive mentoring and close editing. Writing fellows are fully integrated members of the Prospect editorial team. The alums are illustrious -- the program is truly the farm team for progressive journalism.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The American Prospect hosts three classes of interns each year, with full and part time positions available. Editorial interns assist with fact-checking, research, social media, data entry and library services for both the print magazine and the daily website. Interns are encouraged to contribute editorially, writing articles and briefs as assigned, and participating in staff meetings to generate story ideas. They are encouraged to pursue their own projects under the guidance of Prospect staff.

Population(s) Served
Young adults
Students
Older adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Academics, Activists

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of website sessions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Academics, Activists

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of website pageviews

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Academics, Activists

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

“Wherever the people are well informed they can be trusted with their own government” – Thomas Jefferson

At the Prospect, we know a thriving fourth estate is critical to democracy.

We believe in open access to all of our content, and depend on the support of readers to keep to this mission.


The American Prospect has the mission of tracking power from Washington to the corporate boardroom, and showing how innovative policy can bring that power closer to the people. At our daily website, our six print magazines per year, our newsletters, our affiliated podcasts, and our live and virtual events, we seek to inform the broad public on the need for a democratically-governed economy with vibrant public institutions and a restrained foreign policy that rejects imperialism.

Over the past few years, the Prospect has expanded the frequency of its print magazines and the number of daily articles on its website. We have added people to our editorial staff. We have revamped our website to make it easier to navigate, especially on mobile devices. We have increased our traffic significantly and widened an impact that doesn’t always just show up in the numbers.

The Prospect team has been able to power through the pandemic in a fully remote environment to produce award-winning work that makes an impact not only on legislative action but in influencing the conversation in politics and society. TAP has moved the needle on topics such as corporate monopoly and monopsony; employee equity and worker power; racial justice and education; student debt relief; transportation and infrastructure policy; and so much more.

Our mission has become more important in these divided times. We believe we are providing something that readers cannot get anywhere else, at the nexus of worker and corporate power, politics and policy.

As Politico reported in April, “The Prospect has repeatedly broken big stories about the Biden administration at times, becoming a bit of a liberal bulwark… and the Biden administration is reading.”

This broadened reach has enabled us to grow not only our audience but the number of readers willing to support us financially. We now identify 89,051 registered readers in our audience database (as of 06/14/2022), with 3,844 active members who provide recurring donations either monthly or annually. In a last-12-months measurement, the Prospect is showing a 30.5 percent increase in active subscribers over the previous year. Monthly recurring revenue is up 45.3 percent in the same period.



How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    300,000 online readers monthly and 10,000 readers of our bimonthly print magazine.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.),

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback,

Financials

THE AMERICAN PROSPECT
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

THE AMERICAN PROSPECT

Board of directors
as of 06/24/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Amy Hanauer

Paul Starr

Princeton University

Miles Rapoport

Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School

Adele Simmons

Global Philanthropy Partnership

Jacob Hacker

Stanley Resor Professor of Political Science at Yale University

Janet Shenk

Arca Foundation Board of Directors

Robert Kuttner

Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University

Daaiyah Bilal-Threats

National Education Association

Chuck Collins

Institute for Policy Studies

David Dayen

Executive Editor, The American Prospect

Stanley Greenberg

Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research

Derrick Jackson

Fellow, Union of Concerned Scientists

Randall Kennedy

Professor, Harvard Law School

Rebecca Dixon

National Employment Law Project

Ellen Meany

The American Prospect

Shanti Fry

Finance Co-chair, Senator Elizabeth Warren

Jon Hart

Former General Counsel, National Public Radio

Javier Morillo

Former President, SEIU Local 26

Michael Stern

Independent Film Producer

Amy Hanauer

Executive Director, Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy

Ganesh Sitaraman

Professor, Vanderbilt Law School

William Spriggs

Chief Economist, AFL-CIO; Professor, Department of Economics at Howard University

Valerie Wilson

Director, Program on Race, Ethnicity, and the Economy, Economic Policy Institute

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 6/24/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/24/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.