GOLD2021

Princeton Project 55

Engage at Every Age

aka Princeton AlumniCorps   |   Princeton, NJ   |  www.alumnicorps.org

Mission

The mission of Princeton AlumniCorps is toupports community organizations committed to building a more just, equitable and sustainable society by developing and engaging young leaders and professionals of all ages to advance social change. We pursue our mission by (a) Providing leadership training programs across the arc of civic engagement, (b) building an expansive community of engaged citizens and organizations, and (c) creating and deepening social impact. Our programs are national in scope and operate in Boston, Chicago, New Jersey, New York, Philadelphia, the San Francisco Bay Area, and Washington, DC. We are volunteer-led, with an actively engaged Board of Directors and more than 200 volunteers whose time and talents make our programs possible.

Ruling year info

1995

Executive Director

Caryn Tomljanovich

Main address

12 Stockton Street

Princeton, NJ 08540 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1647841

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Nonprofits provide essential services to local populations, advocating for systemic social change by mobilizing government, business, organizations, and individuals, supporting those who are marginalized or stigmatized, investing time and finances in addressing societal wrongs, promoting healing, understanding and humanitarian policies, and transforming communities and personal lives. This sector faces serious challenges, however, including (a) a growing deficit of highly-skilled leadership; (b) high turnover rates among junior staff members who seek opportunities for career advancement, jeopardizing organizational stability and undermining impact; (c) the lack of financial and human resources to adequately address the myriad issues they face; (d) a dearth of networks among individuals and organizations working on societal change, limiting effective collaborative efforts and stymieing progress; and (e) the capacity to leverage networks that do exist to effect change.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Princeton Project 55 Fellowships

The Princeton Project 55 Fellowship Program provides year-long fellowship opportunities for recent Princeton graduates to develop a lifelong commitment to civic engagement and to prepare for effective civic leadership, gain professional skills and leadership experience, and join a community of alumni and innovative organizations dedicated to the common good.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Emerging Leaders professional development program is designed to help aspiring and emerging nonprofit leaders develop the leadership capabilities, management skills and confidence to advance their professional contribution and accelerate their careers in the nonprofit sector while translating lasting value to their organizations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Princeton AlumniCorps programs engage alumni of all ages in a suite of activities that build their civic leadership skills while also contributing to the collective capacity of organizations and communities to address social issues. Through an arc of opportunities beginning with the first year out of college and continuing to later in life when alumni are looking to put their skills and experience to work in new ways, AlumniCorps provides formative experiences, training, community, and support. While some of our programs are oriented specifically to alumni of Princeton University, others are open to all. In each instance, we seek not only to train talented individuals to be more effective civic leaders, no matter their career but to inspire others to do the same.

We pursue our mission by (a) providing leadership training programs across the arc of civic engagement, (b) catalyzing an expanding network of engaged citizens and organizations and (c) creating and deepening social impact. With nearly 2,000 program alumni, 200 volunteers, and a network of nearly 600 nonprofit partner organizations, Princeton AlumniCorps is a unique catalyst of dynamic engagement of people and organizations committed to building civic leadership across generations.

With nearly three decades of experience working with nonprofits and other civic-minded organizations across the country, AlumniCorps leads the charge to develop talent, create networks, and nourish a pipeline of effective leaders in the nonprofit sector. But we need your help to support these efforts and grow AlumniCorps’ programs, reach, and ability to effect change.

With nearly 2,000 program alumni, 200 volunteers, and a network of nearly 600 nonprofit partner organizations nationwide in areas ranging from early childhood development, education, public health, community development, to the environment and the arts, Princeton AlumniCorps is a unique catalyst of dynamic engagement of people and organizations committed to building a new generation of civic leaders and a more vibrant nonprofit community.

Goals elucidated in our 2017 Strategic Plan include:
- Mobilizing Our Network
- Strengthening & Expanding Existing Leadership Programs
- Building our Endowment
- Renovating our offices in a Historic Building in Princeton

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection

Financials

Princeton Project 55
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Princeton Project 55

Board of directors
as of 10/21/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Nat Piggee

R. Kenly Webster

Attorney-at-Law, R. Kenly Webster, P.C.

Kathryn Miller

Bronx Regional Health Information Organization

Elizabeth A. Duffy

International Schools Services

Judy Hole Suratt

New York Area Volunteer

Debra Kushma

Phoenix Strategic Performance

Andrew Protain

Google

Margaret Russell

Santa Clara University School of Law

Kathy Qu

Entangled Business Solutions

Harold Colton-Max

Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan NJ

Claire Fowler

Princeton University

Richard O. Walker, III

R.O. Walker Company, LLC and Orr Associates, Inc.

J. Rogers Woolston

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/21/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 10/21/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.