International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security

Global Youth Connect

Empowering Youth to Advance Human Rights in a Conflict-Prone World

aka GYC   |   New York, NY   |  http://www.globalyouthconnect.org

Mission

A deep-rooted desire to help put an end to the dehumanization and devastation of genocide and mass violence inspires the work of Global Youth Connect. We believe that investing in youth and enabling them to serve as active bystanders to promote and protect human rights is a critical strategy to help prevent and minimize the escalation of conflict as well as heal divided and traumatized communities seeking to rebuild after conflict. Based on our experience, we believe that the concepts and strategies of human rights education offer today's youth the most powerful tools of understanding and motivation to take action.

Ruling year info

1990

Executive Director

Mr. Dechen Christian Albero

Main address

P.O. Box 1342

New York, NY 10159 USA

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EIN

52-1655875

Cause area (NTEE code) info

International Human Rights (Q70)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Other Youth Development N.E.C. (O99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Global Youth Connect (GYC) focuses on providing human rights education and advocacy training for young leaders (ages 14 -35) from around the world. Our programs focus on education and developing capacities to more effectively advocate for human rights at local, state, national and global levels. Through our unique action learning communities, we also aim to promote cross-cultural understanding and dialogue across cultural divides by bringing together international and local participants in each of the countries where we operate.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Human Rights Learning Communities

GYC's training programs, known as "learning communities," guide young participants through an experiential learning process. Together, participants develop common frameworks of understanding, enhance their substantive knowledge of human rights, strengthen their leadership skills, build supportive relationships, and develop collaborative projects to address issues of peace and justice. The term "learning community" derives from the popular education movement and refers to a group of learners who together construct knowledge through shared dialogue, reflection and action. To complement its educational program, GYC also provides opportunities for youth to take action through substantive, cross-cultural volunteer projects. Participants are encouraged to work within the structure of existing organizations, as well as to create new and innovative projects. Our programs are supporting and engaging the world's youth to be pro-active in resolving the toughest abuses of rights, promoting human dignity and building a peaceful global community. We currently have programs to connect youth from the U.S. to youth and human rights issues in the Netherlands and several post-conflict countries: Colombia, Rwanda and South Africa. We also plan to launch a local initiative in Seattle to train, connect and inspire high school students around global human rights as well as increase activities and opportunities for our program alumni/ae.

Population(s) Served
Young Adults (20-25 years)
Students
Budget
$60,000

Where we work

Accreditations

Warren Wilson College 2018

Affiliations & memberships

Institute of International Education, Generation Study Abroad Commitment Partner 2016

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

GYC's programs provide young leaders (ages 14-35) from a wide range of ethnic, national, economic and religious backgrounds with opportunities to learn more about human rights and enhance their ability to take action on pressing human rights issues.<br/><br/>Using the Human Rights framework enshrined in the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, GYC aims to:<br/><br/>--> Increase understanding among youth of both the theoretical and practical context of the human rights framework<br/><br/>--> Build the skills, knowledge and confidence of youth to raise awareness, take action and work collaboratively on projects to promote and defend human rights;<br/><br/>--> Facilitate meaningful dialogue, enable critical thinking and analysis of complex issues and encourage joint problem solving to address shared human rights concerns;<br/><br/>--> Foster personal and emotional growth by testing boundaries and limitations, reflecting critically on our own lives and cultures, exploring how the choices we make affect others;<br/><br/>--> Build strong personal connections and community among youth activists;<br/><br/>--> Provide positive outlets and opportunities for youth to work to promote human rights; and<br/><br/>-->Create, inspire and nurture both new and existing youth-led projects aimed at promoting and protecting human rights.

In 3-4 weeks, our programs weave together a three-tiered approach. First, our delegates get experiential development training through an interactive cross-cultural human rights education workshop. Second, the delegates engage in site visits with key stakeholders in local human rights efforts, including with members of government, international and local NGOs, and members of the community. Third, delegates get on-the-ground experience volunteering with local human rights organizations and doing human rights work.<br/><br/>Throughout all three components of the program, our delegates develop skills critical to grassroots organizing, conflict transformation, human rights activism and leadership, and technical support for on-going organizing efforts. They also become more deeply integrated into an international community of youth activists who are actively promoting and protecting human rights, as well as educating and inspiring the next generation to work for peaceful change.<br/><br/>Additionally, GYC embraces the concept of a learning community and uses this in our delegations. A "Learning Community" is an experiential educational process. Participants work together to develop common frameworks of understanding, enhance their substantive knowledge of human rights, strengthen their leadership skills, build supportive peer relationships, and develop collaborative projects to address issues of peace, justice and human rights. The term Learning Community comes from the popular education movement and refers to a group of learners who work together to create knowledge through shared dialogue, reflection and action. We add the term “action" because it reminds us that we have a responsibility to act on what has been learned.

Our programs serve a global community of youth and young adults, ages 14-35. We support youth who are already established leaders in their community and who are looking for ways to strengthen their skills, expand their understanding, deepen the impact of social justice projects and build a network of supportive allies. We collaborate with local organizations in each host country to exponentially increase our impact. We do not do this work alone. By working alongside organizations in Rwanda, Colombia, Bosnia and South Africa, our delegates plug into existing organizations that can push forward the human rights work once our delegates depart. We also serve youth who are at an earlier stage in their activism to enable them to better understand how to use their unique talents to advance human rights. As a global organization with programs in a variety of countries around the world, the youth we work with come from all backgrounds – from the poorest communities to the wealthiest, from the “developed" world to the “underdeveloped" world, and from a wide range of ethnic, national, and religious backgrounds.

Each delegation has a survey that is done after the delegation to gather feedback on each participant and the experience they have had. We take this information to craft further programming so that we can continually enhance the programs. Additionally, we have looked for opportunities to engage in other ways in the world after getting feedback from our delegates. For example, we are beginning to work in South Africa to expand our Africa programs --- after receiving feedback from folks interested in these programs. We also follow our alumni. 97% of GYC alumni say the program positively influenced their career trajectory. 47% of alumni currently hold jobs in the field of Human Rights. 20% of alumni have started their own human rights organizations.

Global Youth Connect has run successful delegations for years in Rwanda and Bosnia. In 2015, it launched its first ever delegation to Colombia which was a success and is now a staple destination within GYC's portfolio. In 2018, GYC launched its first program in South Africa and the organization continues to prioritize programming in this country. GYC is also looking to expand, controllably and strategically, into new markets where we can continue to forge mutually beneficial collaborations. We are looking to also be more strategic with finding funding to offer scholarships for people who want to go on a GYC program, have something to contribute to a GYC program but who do not have the means to afford the program fee. We are looking to make our delegations more reflective of the communities we are a part of and that is still a work in progress.

Financials

Global Youth Connect
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Global Youth Connect

Board of directors
as of 2/19/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Erin Abrams

AFS Intercultural Programs

Term: 2019 -

Faryal Khan-Thompson

TAG Worldwide

Nelson Pereira

Commonfund

Erin Abrams

AFS Intercultural Programs

Michael Pettinger

John Cabot University

Derek DeRosa

Deutsche Bank

Debra Kram-Fernandez

State University of New York, Empire State College

Kelly Baker

Main Street Launch

Maren Hurley

Center for Community Alternatives

Michael Pettinger

John Cabot University

Erika Rodriguez

Global Youth Connect

Ronnie Burrage

World Rhythm Academy

Meghan Ramil

National Academy of Sciences

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/19/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not Transgender (Cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/19/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.

Keywords

youth, human rights, activism, advocacy, social justice, social transformation, training, education, social justice, peace