Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy

Families Against Mandatory Minimums Foundation

Families for Justice Reform

aka FAMM

Washington, DC

Mission

FAMM is the national voice for fair sentencing laws and prison policies. We shine a light on the human face of incarceration, advocate for state and federal sentencing reform, and mobilize thousands of individuals and families whose lives are adversely affected by unjust sentences and harmful prison policies.

Ruling Year

1991

President

Mr. Kevin A. Ring

Main Address

1100 H Street NW Suite 1000

Washington, DC 20005 USA

Keywords

drug laws, sentencing, criminal justice, drug policy, mandatory minimums, prison alternatives, prison reform

EIN

52-1750246

 Number

4800603366

Cause Area (NTEE Code)

Civil Rights, Advocacy for Specific Groups (R20)

Services to Prisoners/Families (I43)

IRS Filing Requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Social Media

Programs + Results

What we aim to solve

FAMM is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization fighting for smart sentencing laws and prison policies. We see a country where incarceration is individualized, humane, and sufficient to impose fair punishment and protect public safety. Our supporters include taxpayers, families, prisoners, law enforcement, attorneys, judges, criminal justice experts, and concerned citizens.

Our programs

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Federal Advocacy Program

State Advocacy Program

Communication and Education

Where we work

Charting Impact

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

What are the organization's key strategies for making this happen?

What are the organization's capabilities for doing this?

How will they know if they are making progress?

What have they accomplished so far and what's next?

Federal advocacy goals for the next five years: 1.) Promote reforms to the federal sentencing guidelines. 2.) Promote judicial discretion and individualized sentencing through the federal courts. 3.) Expand federal compassionate release. 4.) Oppose new mandatory minimum proposals and other harmful legislation. 5.) Build support for federal sentencing and prison reform. State advocacy goals for the next five years: 1.) Secure meaningful sentencing reform in more states. 2.) Expand state compassionate release. 3.) Oppose new mandatory minimum proposals and other harmful legislation. Communications and public education goals for the next five years: 1.) Expand our digital storytelling and public education efforts. 2.) Promote knowledge and support of FAMM's federal and state reform campaigns. 3.) Enhance our online media presence. Organizing goals for the next five years: 1.) Build a group of action-oriented advocates equipped and empowered to engage with lawmakers and the public in support of smart sentencing and prison reform.

Federal advocacy strategies: 1.) File amicus briefs to the Supreme Court for cases in which decisions could significantly change or eliminate mandatory minimum sentencing practices. 2.) Work with lobbyists at the federal level to educate lawmakers about the harmful effects of mandatory minimum policies. 3.) Work with organizations and individuals to increase public education and create reform around our broken compassionate release system. 4.) Assist lawmakers in crafting legislation that eliminates mandatory minimum sentencing. 5.) Assist lawmakers in crafting legislation for cost effective, evidence based rehabilitation programs and reentry services. State Advocacy Strategies: 1.) Work with lobbyists at the state level to educate lawmakers about the harmful effects of mandatory minimum policies. 2.) Mobilize affected families to push the reform movement forward at the state level. 3.) Work with organizations and individuals to increase public education and create reform around our broken compassionate release system. 4.) Assist lawmakers in crafting legislation that eliminates mandatory minimum sentencing. Communication Strategies: 1.) Create and widely distribute videos and written profiles of prisoners and families that have been impacted by excessive prison sentences. 2.) Educate the public and increase support for sentencing reform by putting a face to the issue. Organizing Strategies: 1.) Mobilize, inform, communicate, and collaborate with prisoners and their families to achieve change. 2.) Conduct storytelling and advocacy training. 3.) Provide online resources and support through FAMM's Justice Now Action Center.

FAMM's federal and state programs have a proven track record of building support for reform. Our advocacy addresses reform of prison policies, mandatory minimum sentencing laws, amendments to the federal sentencing guidelines, sentencing cases in the U.S. Supreme Court, federal courts of appeals, and state courts. FAMM has won several significant reforms that have reduced prison sentences for thousands, including the biggest guideline change to date when the U.S. Sentencing Commission lowered all drug sentences by two levels in 2014. We have spearheaded several successful state campaigns, and currently operate full-time campaigns in Florida, Pennsylvania, Arizona, North Carolina, Missouri, and Texas while providing technical and public support in a number of other states. FAMM's public education and communications efforts have been integral to this success. Our greatest asset is the personal stories of our members, which have been pivotal in winning the hearts and minds of lawmakers and the public. We anticipate even greater change now that we have begun organizing affected families and individuals through our national FAMM advocates program.

Progress indicators include:
1.) Successful amicus briefs that sway Supreme Court decisions in support of more fair sentencing practices.
2.) Changes in federal and state sentencing guidelines that reduce or eliminate mandatory minimum sentencing policies.
3.) Increase in the number of individuals granted federal and state compassionate release.
4.) Establishment of an active and effective network of affected individuals and families.
5.) Improvement in federal rehabilitation programs and reentry services.

Over the past two and a half decades, FAMM has led campaigns for some of the biggest federal sentencing reforms, beginning with the federal safety valve enacted in 1994, which continues to help thousands of low-level drug offenders avoid excessive mandatory minimum sentences every year.

FAMM was one of the five founding members of Clemency Project 2014 (CP2014), the massive pro bono effort organized to assist the Obama administration's clemency initiative. FAMM helped train attorneys to draft clemency petitions and served on panels that screened petitions. CP2014 submitted more than 2,500 petitions. President Obama granted 1,715 applications for clemency.

In 2016, FAMM released a dynamic new report, “Using Time to Reduce Crime: Federal Prisoner Survey Results Show Ways to Reduce Recidivism." The report includes the findings of the first-ever independent survey of federal prisoners, which focused on the type and quality of educational and vocational training programs, as well as substance abuse and mental health treatment, currently available in America's federal prisons.

In 2017, FAMM launched new policy initiatives around prison and parole reform, compassionate release, and state clemency. Moving forward, we will work to engage and mobilize more families and individuals who might be affected by injustices not directly tied to mandatory sentencing and, in doing so, promote broader criminal justice reform.

External Reviews

Financials

Families Against Mandatory Minimums Foundation

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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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  • A Pro report is also available for this organization.

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Board Leadership Practices

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section, which enables organizations and donors to transparently share information about essential board leadership practices.

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

BOARD ORIENTATION & EDUCATION

Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations?

No

CEO OVERSIGHT

Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year?

No

ETHICS & TRANSPARENCY

Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year?

No

BOARD COMPOSITION

Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership?

No

BOARD PERFORMANCE

Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years?

No

Organizational Demographics

In order to support nonprofits and gain valuable insight for the sector, GuideStar worked with D5—a five-year initiative to advance diversity, equity, and inclusion in philanthropy—in creating a questionnaire. This section is a voluntary questionnaire that empowers organizations to share information on the demographics of who works in and leads organizations. To protect the identity of individuals, we do not display sexual orientation or disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff. Any values displayed in this section are percentages of the total number of individuals in each category (e.g. 20% of all Board members for X organization are female).

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Gender

Race & Ethnicity

Sexual Orientation

Diversity Strategies

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We track retention of staff, board, and volunteers across demographic categories
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We track income levels of staff, senior staff, and board across demographic categories
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We track the age of staff, senior staff, and board
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We track the diversity of vendors (e.g., consultants, professional service firms)
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We have a diversity committee in place
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We have a diversity manager in place
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We have a diversity plan
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We use other methods to support diversity