PLATINUM2024

National Press Club Journalism Institute

aka NPCJI   |   Washington, DC   |  www.pressclubinstitute.org

Mission

The National Press Club Journalism Institute promotes an engaged global citizenry through an independent and free press, and equips journalists with skills and standards to inform the public in ways that inspire civic engagement. The Institute accomplishes this mission by: offering programs to grow the number of people who produce and support journalism that drives civic engagement; protecting journalists from interference so they can fully and fairly represent the communities they serve; and increasing transparency to keep citizens well-informed and their governments and institutions accountable.

Ruling year info

1992

Executive Director

Ms. Beth Francesco

Main address

529 14th Street, NW 13th Floor

Washington, DC 20045 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Eric Friedheim National Journalism Library

Friends of the National Journalism Library

EIN

52-1750908

NTEE code info

Media, Communications Organizations (A30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The National Press Club Journalism Institute powers journalism in the public interest.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Writing Workshop

Half-day of concurrent sessions on topics of interest to nonfiction writers and journalists.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants engaged in programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of list subscribers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Growth:
- Diversify revenue streams so no source comprises more than one-third of the total.
- Fully fund programmatic and service ambitions; Examine the competitive landscape for beneficial collaboration and partnerships.

Identity:
- Expand and deepen the Institute’s connections across the country with news organizations and professional journalists, who increasingly see the Institute as an advocate and resource for impactful, representative journalism.
- Elevate the Institute’s profile as a premier source of training and support, known for helping journalism organizations strengthen and diversify their newsrooms and the communities they serve.
- Serve the public to improve information literacy and increase understanding of journalism’s value in a democracy.

Impact:
- Journalists across the United States will be more skilled and supported in producing well-crafted journalism as a result of the Institute’s programs.
- Journalism organizations will be more diverse, equitable, and inclusive, as a result of the Institute’s programs. The work they produce will be more accurate, fair, and representative of the expanded communities they serve.
- Americans will more clearly understand the fundamental importance of an independent press, fact-based reporting, and civil discourse as a result of the Journalism Institute’s efforts.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We find response rates to emailed surveys are low.

Financials

National Press Club Journalism Institute
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Press Club Journalism Institute

Board of directors
as of 02/29/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Gil Klein

Rob Stoddard

National Cable Telecommunications Association

Doug Harbrecht

1998 National Press Club president

Andrea Edney

2018 National Press Club president

Sam Feist

CNN

Michael Freedman

The George Washington University & 2020 National Press Club president

Betsy Fischer Martin

American University

Tom Huang

The Dallas Morning News

Richard Hutzell

Fallen Journalists Memorial Foundation

Jen Judson

Defense News

Rafael Lorente

University of Maryland

Lisa Matthews

Associated Press and 2021 National Press Club president

Paul Minehart

Syngenta

Mizell Stewart III

USA TODAY Network / Gannett

Chuck Tobin

Ballard Spahr

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Not applicable