HUMANE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL

Celebrating animals, confronting cruelty

aka HSI   |   Washington, DC   |  hsi.org

Mission

Humane Society International works around the globe to promote the human-animal bond, rescue and protect dogs and cats, improve farm animal welfare, protect wildlife, promote animal-free testing and research, respond to natural disasters and confront cruelty to animals in all of its forms.

Ruling year info

1993

CEO

Kitty Block

President

Jeff Flocken

Main address

1255 23rd Street, NW, Suite 450

Washington, DC 20037 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1769464

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

HSI is one of the only global animal protection organizations working to help all animals—including animals in laboratories, animals on farms, companion animals and wildlife—and our record of achievement demonstrates our global impact for animal protection. Animals are vulnerable to many forms of cruelty and abuse. Laws enshrine many forms of extreme cruelty as legal, including some standard practices in factory farming, the fur industry, cosmetics and product testing, trophy hunting and the use of animals in entertainment and competition. Animals are at risk during natural disasters and due to acts of intentional cruelty and neglect, with many communities lacking the resources needed to address their needs. Captive wildlife require accredited sanctuary. The presence of wild animals in our communities is too often and erroneously considered a problem or nuisance, with lethal results for the animals. These are the challenges that HSI takes on and succeeds at addressing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

End the cruelest practices

We fight the worst, most institutionalized forms of animal abuse and cruelty around the world. Our current priorities include, we aim to ending cosmetics testing on animals, reducing the trophy hunting of wildlife, easing the suffering of billions of farm animals by eliminating cruel systems of confinement and ending the dog-meat trade in South Korea.

Population(s) Served

We work with government agencies to respond to cruelty and disasters where the need is greatest, develop humane and sustainable programs to improve the welfare of street dogs and cats and advance alternatives to the use of lethal and cruel animal management approaches. We also provide lifetime care for more than 60 chimpanzees—most of whom were previously used in invasive research—in Liberia, Africa through our Second Chance Chimpanzee Refuge Liberia. We are currently increasing our capacity to respond to animal cruelty and natural disasters around the world.

Population(s) Served

We support the efforts of allied organizations and partners—locally, nationally and globally—to advance humane work through education, training, advocacy, direct care, implementation and enforcement of laws and consumer choice initiatives. Our mission includes helping those who stand with us become stronger and better and to engage them more deeply in our campaigns.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

Better Business Bureau 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Percentage of global cosmetic market with laws banning cosmetic animal testing and trade

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are working to end the use of animals in cosmetic testing, including passing laws to ban cosmetic animal testing and trade.

Number of global cage- or crate-free corporate commitments

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

As a part of our campaign to end the extreme confinement of farm animals, we work with companies to rid their supply chain of products that come from these conditions.

Percentage of South Koreans who support banning dog meat

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are working to end the dog meat industry in South Korea and are tracking public opposition to this industry in order to gauge the impact of our work.

Number of breeding-aged female elephants contracepted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Care for animals in crisis

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

For years, we have worked to develop cutting edge research on the use of immunocontraception on wild elephant populations in order to mitigate human-wildlife conflicts.

Percentage of female dogs sterilized in Dehradun, India

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Care for animals in crisis

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are working to develop humane, sustainable street dog management programs in several communities in India. One way we measure our impact is by the percentage of dogs who are spayed or neutered.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

End cosmetic animal testing and trade: Animals are still suffering and dying to test shampoo, mascara and other cosmetic products. Terrified rabbits, rats, guinea pigs and mice have substances forced down their throats, dripped into their eyes or smeared onto their skin before they are killed. Our goal is to achieve bans on cosmetic animal testing and trade in at least 50% of major global beauty markets.

End trophy hunting: Each year, hundreds of thousands of animals are killed by trophy hunters, whose primary motivation is simply to obtain animal parts for display and bragging rights. Trophy hunting is not only extremely cruel, it can also exacerbate the population decline of already imperiled species. Our near-term goal is to reduce trophy hunting of five African and two European species.

End the use of gestation crates and cages for egg-laying hens: On factory farms, egg-laying hens and mother pigs are kept in cages and crates so small they can barely move. Our near-term goal is to reduce the number of animals in extreme cage confinement in top pork- and egg-producing countries by 18.9 million.

Expand our capacity to respond to large-scale cruelty and natural disasters: When disaster strikes around the world, we deploy teams of veterinarians and field responders to collaborate with local, regional, national and international organizations in providing animal rescue, relief and evacuation. We also respond to man-made disasters and large-scale situations of cruelty and neglect. Our current focus is to expand our capacity to reach and rescue animals impacted by major disasters.

End the dog meat trade in South Korea: An estimated 2 million dogs are kept and killed in cruel conditions on thousands of dog meat farms in South Korea, the only country in the world that raises dogs for slaughter for human consumption. Our near-term goal is to secure a legislative ban on the industry.

Establish humane and sustainable street dog management programs: Hundreds of millions of dogs and cats roam the streets worldwide. In many places, street dogs and cats suffer from inhumane culling, as well as starvation, dehydration, exposure to the elements, injury and disease. Our near-term goal is to establish humane, effective and locally run programs in India.

Immunocontraception: African elephants are threatened with extinction due to poaching and habitat loss, degradation and destruction. They are being squeezed into smaller and smaller areas and are often threatened with lethal culling to manage the population. Since 1996, HSI has funded cutting edge research on the use of immunocontraception of wild elephant populations. Our near-term goal is to contracept virtually all breeding-age female elephants in South Africa (outside of Greater Kruger National Park, where immunocontraception is not used) to ensure their protection.

Humane Society International addresses the root cause of animal suffering, which requires changing the legal framework governing the treatment of animals and the practices of large-scale industries, as well as winning the hearts and minds of the public.

Training and capacity building: We invest in activities that lift up the whole animal protection movement, engaging and training volunteers, animal advocates, shelter and rescue professionals, educators and government agencies around the world.

Strengthening public policy and enforcement: We’re strengthening legal protections for animals at the local and national levels around the globe. We defend those victories in court and press for robust enforcement of existing policies.

Improving corporate policy: We work with the world’s biggest food and apparel companies, cosmetics manufacturers and leaders in other industries to improve the treatment of animals. We make the case that caring about animal welfare is good for business, but we also use media coverage and other channels for evaluating and encouraging further progress in the industries we target.

Rescue and direct care: We respond to natural disasters and cruelty cases, manage a sanctuary for chimpanzees in Liberia, support humane and sustainable management programs for street dogs and cats and much more.

Education and awareness: We’re driving the wider conversation around animals, encouraging everyone to join us in creating a culture that lives up to the promise of our name: A humane society.

We have extensive internal expertise around the challenges facing specific types of animals, as well as expertise in the tactics we employ to achieve lasting change.

Country offices: HSI has offices in 21 countries around the world and we work to advance the welfare of animals in over 50 countries.

Subject-matter experts: We employ staff specialists working on issues facing farm animals, companion animals, wildlife, animals used in research and animals impacted by disaster situations. We bring on staff specialists, including scientists and veterinarians, around the world.

Corporate campaigners: Our teams include experts in corporate campaigns, who have brokered agreements with companies and institutions to make food supply chains more humane, increase plant-based options in institutional dining, go fur-free, commit to alternatives to animal testing, adopt non-lethal management strategies and more.

Investigators: Oftentimes the most insidious forms of animal abuse happen behind closed doors and out of the public view. For those situations, we deploy investigators to expose the abuse and suffering of animals.

Outreach and training experts: We are committed to strengthening the animal protection movement and engaging more people in our work. Our outreach experts provide training and resources to government agencies, animal shelters, veterinarians and individual advocates and volunteers to make sure they have the tools they need to improve the lives of animals.

Communications experts: Our communications teams prepare and present compelling stories about animals with the goal of increasing awareness, influencing hearts and minds, and inspiring our membership to take action.

In 2021, we continued to adapt to new realities created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Most staff members carried on our fight for all animals remotely, while those whose jobs involve community outreach, animal rescue or care continued to do their lifesaving work on the ground. Despite the challenges, we made tremendous progress on our strategic priorities:


End animal cosmetic testing and trade: Mexico became the first North American country to end cosmetics testing on animals following a campaign by HSI/Mexico and our allies that was catalyzed by the release of HSI’s animated short film, Save Ralph. The European Parliament voted almost unanimously for a phase-out action plan and ambitious timetable for ending all use of animals for research, testing and education in the European Union.

End the use of gestation crates and cages for egg-laying hens: HSI won a pledge from the grocery chain Cencosud Brazil, one of the biggest supermarkets in Brazil, to sell only cage-free eggs, and the largest egg producer in Latin America, Grupo Mantigueira, confirmed the expansion of its cage-free production to 1 million hens. In Mexico, Barceló Hotel Group, with more than 250 hotels in 22 countries, and Palladium Hotel Group, with 50 properties in six countries, will be cage-free by 2025.

End trophy hunting: After years of work on the issue, South Africa agreed to adopt massive reforms that will lead to a ban on the breeding and trophy hunting of lions in captivity, the commercial trade of captive lion parts and the cub petting industry. The British government announced that it will take one the world’s strongest stands against trophy hunting by pledging to ban trophy imports of over 7,000 species.

Expand our capacity to respond to large-scale cruelty and natural disasters: As part of our continuing COVID-19 response, HSI and our grant-supported partners fed and cared for nearly 35,000 homeless and owned animals around the world impacted by the pandemic. We also responded to natural disasters, providing emergency relief to 4,300 animals affected by devastating floods in the state of Kerala, India, in collaboration with the Department of Animal Husbandry, and emergency veterinary care for 1,250 pets after flooding in Costa Rica’s Caribbean and northern areas.

End the dog meat trade: In South Korea, where we have been working to close down dog meat farms and transition farmers to a humane living, we rescued 119 dogs at two farms in collaboration with partner groups and local authorities, and flew 170 dogs rescued from the dog meat industry to our care and rehabilitation center in the U.S. to prepare for adoption.

Establish humane and sustainable street dog management programs: In 2021, our teams in India successfully sterilized 27,864 dogs, ensuring that more than 80% of the street dogs in the cities of Dehradun, Vadodara, Nainital, and Mussoorie are sterilized and vaccinated.


Financials

HUMANE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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HUMANE SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL

Board of directors
as of 06/28/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Susan Atherton


Board co-chair

Leslie Barcus

Brian Borg

Marcelo de Andrade

Marilia Duffles

Nicholas Ibarguen

Jennifer Laue

Steven White

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 5/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data