PLATINUM2024

National Forest Foundation

Missoula, MT   |  http://www.nationalforests.org/

Mission

The organization generates funding for the protection, management and conservation of forest and range resources; stimulates public involvement in the stewardship of public lands; and increases awareness of the legacy of the national forests and the benefits of sustainable management of natural resources

Notes from the nonprofit

The National Forest Foundation is a small, lean organization addressing huge issues. We seek to leverage all resources to their greatest effect. We pride ourselves on our stewardship of donor and funder relationships so those who invest in our mission know how we're using their funds. Finally, we always welcome inquiries! Please reach us by visiting our website at www.nationalforests.org. Thank you.

Ruling year info

1993

President and CEO

Ms. Mary Mitsos

Main address

27 Fort Missoula Rd, Suite 3

Missoula, MT 59804 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1786332

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Forest Conservation (C36)

Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation and Management (C32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2019.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Our country's National Forests - the 193-million-acre public estate - belong to all Americans. They give us clean air, fresh water, an amazing diversity of life, and endless opportunities to enjoy these wild lands year round. Each year, the pressures - wildfire, diseases, changing weather patterns, and visitation - on these landscapes are increasing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Treasured Landscapes, Unforgettable Experiences Initiative

This flagship effort spearheads large-scale restoration of iconic landscapes around the country and reconnects Americans with their public lands in meaningful ways. Currently, priority sites include National Forests and Grasslands in the states of Oregon, California, Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Illinois,  Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oregon, and Washington.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

This ambitious effort aims to measurably restore America's National Forests damaged by wildfires, hurricanes, floods, and insect infestations. Each dollar donated plants one tree.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Our grant programs support local stewardship organizations' on-the-ground conservation work and strengthen their internal capacity to help increase their impact and benefits to their community, environment, and economy.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth

This unique national effort helps develop common vision for forests among divergent interest groups and increase the capacity and effectiveness of local conservation nonprofits. We offer facilitation, collaboration services, training, mentoring, and much more.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The funds pool together small, voluntary contributions from lodge and ski resort guests. Then these contributions are leveraged by the NFF and local conservation partners, and invested back into National Forests where participating lodges and ski resorts are located. Supported projects focus on wildlife habitat improvements, recreation enhancement, community-based forest stewardship, and watershed restoration.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A comprehensive approach to share important information about the values that America's National Forests provide benefiting human and wildlife communities through traditional media channels and social media.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The foundation matches federal funds provided under a cooperative agreement with the Forest Service with non-federal dollars to implement projects that directly benefit national forests and grasslands. Funds can be used to support conservation and restoration projects in the areas of wildlife habitat improvement, recreation, watershed health and restoration, and community-based forestry. Applications will be accepted from non-federal partners, community-based organizations, Native American tribes, and 501(c)(3) nonprofits implementing action-oriented on-the-ground conservation and citizen-based monitoring projects on or around national forests or grasslands. All grants awarded by the foundation require a cash match of at least 1:1 through non-federal donations.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Alaskan Natives
American Indians
Multiracial people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Acres of natural habitat restored

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total acres per FY include acres restored and acres with completed wildfire resilience improvements.

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

50 Million for Our Forests

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of invasive species removed from managed area(s)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Alaskan Natives, American Indians, Multiracial people

Related Program

Treasured Landscapes, Unforgettable Experiences Initiative

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Acres treated.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The National Forest Foundation (NFF) is solely dedicated to protecting the ecological health and promoting sustainable public enjoyment of the 193-million-acre National Forest System. Our current strategic plan focuses on:
1) We will invest more in on-the-ground projects to improve the health of our National Forests. We will accelerate and broaden our on-the-ground action to increase carbon sequestration and water replenishment and to restore more acres.

2) We will triple our impact on National Forest recreation infrastructure, expanding the capacity for more people to love the forests without negatively impacting forest health.

3) We will engage millions more Americans in personal and meaningful relationships with National Forests. Our reach will be digital, in-person and through partners. We will focus on communicating with and through a broader diversity of Americans and we will engage millions more than before to build a constituency that demands and works for healthy forests.

The NFF focuses on five strategies to maximize our conservation impact:

1) Working on the ground: We carry out tangible conservation projects producing measurable results. We assess conservation need and ecological value. This ensures our site-based work adds as much value as possible to both local regions and the National Forest System (NFS) as a whole. We work on a "landscape" scale, meaning on thousands of acres rather than just a few hundred. It also means we address multiple challenges, such as plant and wildlife diversity, watershed health, economic leverage, and recreational opportunities to have greater overall impact.

2) Building a community of forest stewards: Diverse groups of engaged citizens and outdoor enthusiasts form a strong cadre of stewards who perpetuate healthy National Forests for many generations to enjoy. The NFF connects people with nature through meaningful hands-on education and volunteer opportunities in their backyard National Forests. We explain why these wild places matter. By engaging youth, including those from urban, rural, and/or underserved communities, we help them develop a land ethic, give back to their backyard forests, and acquire useful skills while building the next generation of dedicated forest stewards.

3) Supporting local conservation partners: We directly support local organizations and contractors through on-the-ground restoration projects.

4) Developing sustainable and innovative funding models: Alternative funding enables us to achieve real, measurable restoration results on our public lands. Seeking out such mechanisms helps us increase the resources available to site-based restoration projects nationwide.

5) Promoting collaboration: Collaborative groups are an effective solution to the complex and often contentious restoration and stewardship needs on these forests. By nature local, organic collaboratives provide an opportunity for all interest groups to weigh-in, be heard, and learn to work together. This approach leads to better conservation results on the ground and more engaged people caring for their treasured wild places. We provide a customized suite of technical assistance and other services to collaborative groups across the country. By facilitating local stakeholder groups, we build a strong foundation of diverse partners who remain engaged in our National Forests' protection and stewardship for decades to come.

A key nonprofit partner to the U.S. Forest Service, the NFF works with hundreds of community and corporate partners nationwide. We have a proven track record of successful large-scale ecosystem restoration on National Forests and Grasslands through leveraging public funding with private support. Our grant programs help us further leverage restoration projects focused on the health and public enjoyment of National Forests. Our main office is based in the heart of the National Forest System, Missoula, Montana. We also have field offices in across the county to align with our scope of work on National Forests. This diversity of office sites allows us to generate meaningful local relationships while maintaining a national presence. The NFF is a committed and efficient conservation organization staffed by professionals who know the issues facing America's National Forests and care deeply about our beloved wild places.

In 2023, we successfully completed fundraising for our ambitious campaign to plant 50 million trees on National Forests. In the first year of the campaign, we planted 2.6 million trees of 17 different native tree species on 25 National Forests, restoring 13,000 acres. In 2023, we planted 5M trees!

Despite these accomplishments and our growing number of supporters, the restoration needs on the 193-million-acre National Forest System are vast. Changing climate conditions, catastrophic wildfires, and aggressive invasive species threaten these treasured landscapes at an unprecedented rate. The Forest Service estimates that more than 60 million acres or approximately one-third of National Forests is in dire need of restoration. A Forest Service survey of watershed conditions estimates that approximately 48 percent of watersheds on National Forests are classified as functioning at risk" or impaired function." U.S. taxpayers are paying about $2.5 billion for wildfire suppression every year and the total estimated impact of U.S. wildfires is many times that number. Experts estimate that all invasive species (aquatic, plants, and insects) cost Americans approximately $138 billion annually in loss of agriculture, fisheries, forestry, and infrastructure maintenance. Additionally, the link between increasingly urban populations and wild nature continues to weaken further disconnecting them from their public lands. This trend spells trouble for the broad, long-term support required to keep America's public lands heritage relevant and thriving.

The need to restore these wild places and increase awareness among the general public, especially youth, and to nurture the next generation of forest stewards has never been greater. We are developing and implementing programs and initiatives to connect Americans to their cherished public lands and increase the financial resources available for landscape-scale restoration bringing our innovative, results-focused, and science-based approaches to meeting these immense challenges.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time

Financials

National Forest Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Forest Foundation

Board of directors
as of 03/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Rob Leary

Former CEO at The Olayan Group

Term: 2021 - 2024

Caroline Choi

Southern California Edison

Mike Brown

Bowery Capital

Aimée Christensen

Christensen Global Strategies

Andie MacDowell

Actress and spokeswoman

Allie Kline

LEO DIX

Randy Peterson

LRP Consultants LLC

Bob Wheeler

Airstream, Inc.

Hugh Wiley

XO Group

Patricia Hayling Price

LiveWorkStrategize LLC

Kevin Murphy

ExxonMobil Foundation

Mary Kate Buckley

Jackson Hole Mountain Resort

Rob Leary

Former CEO at The Olayan Group

Matt Boss

TD Bank

Janice Innis-Thompson

Toren Kutnick

Jose Minaya

Nuveen

Randy Moore

Ex Officio, U.S. Forest Service

Jeff Nuss

GreenWood Resources, Inc

James C O'Donnell

Vail Resorts

Rick Wade

U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Thomas McHenry

Attorney

Logan Marshall

Global Atlantic Financial Group

Annie Kao

Alterra Mountain Company

Paul Hogan

Kenny Thompson, Jr.

Vail Resorts

Brian C. Jacobs

Moai Capital

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/18/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/21/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.