National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

Until No Veteran Is Homeless

aka NCHV   |   Washington, DC   |  http://www.nchv.org

Mission

The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans (NCHV) is the only nationally-based organization solely focused on finding an effective solution for ending veteran homelessness. We work to achieve our mission by promoting collaboration, shaping policy, building service capacity, ensuring accountability, & managing a national hotline. We've build a tight-knit web of almost 200 members and 1700 local service organizations across the country who are addressing the needs of veterans at-risk of & experiencing homelessness. But we will not stop working until every veteran has a home & the ability to maintain it. Our work all comes down to each veteran who avoided or overcame homelessness. We'll continue this effort because it is unacceptable to leave even a single veteran outside the wire.

Ruling year info

1994

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Kathryn Monet

Main address

1001 Connecticut Ave, NW Suite 840

Washington, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1826860

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (Y01)

Military/Veterans' Organizations (W30)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (L01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans (NCHV) was organized in 1990 by a small group of community-based service providers who were troubled by the disproportionately large percentage of homeless people who were veterans (approximately 40% of all homeless males at the time were veterans), and the lack of veteran-specific programs to help them. In addition to the complex set of factors influencing all homelessness – extreme shortage of affordable housing, livable income and access to health care – a large number of displaced and at-risk veterans live with lingering effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance abuse, which are compounded by a lack of family and social support networks. Additionally, military occupations and training are not always transferable to the civilian workforce, placing some veterans at a disadvantage when competing for employment. Unfortunately, there are still approximately 37,085 homeless veterans (2020) on any given night.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Toll-free referral line

NCHV operates a toll-free referral line for veterans experiencing or at-risk of homelessness, and service providers that receive as many as 200 calls a month. Callers are referred to local service providers and other resources that can address their issues related to housing, benefits, legal assistance, health care, and other issues.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Homeless people

NCHV and its Technical Assistance (TA) Center provide guidance and information about program development, administration, governance and funding to all of the nation’s homeless veteran service providers. This is achieved through conferences, webinars, personal consultations, and publications.

TA Center staff offers service providers assistance with administrative organization and program development; information about government, foundation and corporate grants; and guidance to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations.

Population(s) Served
Veterans

NCHV is recognized as the nation’s leading authority on homeless veterans issues by several agencies and departments of the U.S. government, and has worked in partnership on projects with VA, DOL, HUD & FEMA. NCHV has helped develop and increase funding for homeless veteran-specific programs such as the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program and the Supportive Services for Veteran Families Program, all of which are currently funded at their highest levels ever.

Population(s) Served
Veterans
Homeless people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Social and economic status, Veterans, Homeless people

Related Program

Policy & Advocacy

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of coalition members

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Policy & Advocacy

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of people on the organization's email list

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans

Related Program

Policy & Advocacy

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of conference attendees

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Homeless people, Veterans, Activists, Academics, Researchers

Related Program

Technical Assistance

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

NCHV’s vision: Through advocacy and public education we enhance, sustain growth, and improve a system of care so that no veteran has to experience homelessness.

We aim to accomplish this mission by:

Publicizing the needs of homeless veterans and to encourage financial and volunteer support at the local level for homeless veteran relief and assistance projects. 

Sponsoring special projects that will spotlight the needs of homeless veterans throughout the nation. 

Facilitating nationwide news coverage of the needs of homeless veterans and the programs available to assist them. 

Developing promotional programs and public service announcements to educate the public on the needs of homeless veterans. 

Providing educational materials, training, and technical assistance to federal, state, and local agencies and nonprofit community-based organizations wishing to aid homeless veterans. 

Studying and commenting on proposed federal, state, or local legislation or regulations which may affect the welfare of homeless veterans, and to develop public policy proposals designed to improve the services available for homeless veterans.

Though veteran homelessness remains an ongoing issue, we know it is a solvable one, especially when communities work together and national resources and partnerships support their efforts. Veteran homelessness has been reduced by 45% since 2009, in large part due to the work our coalition and their local partners do in collaboration with the resources and support NCHV has advocated for. Our ultimate goal is to ensure every veteran has a place to call home.

NCHV serves as the primary liaison between the nation’s care providers, Congress and the Executive Branch agencies charged with helping them succeed in their work. NCHV's advocacy has continued to strengthen and increase funding for virtually every federal homeless veteran assistance program in existence today.

NCHV is here to make sure local agencies offering a hand up out of homelessness have the resources and tools needed to serve every veteran who experiences or is at risk of homelessness. Our Technical Assistance (TA) Center provides guidance and support to a national network of community-based service providers; local, state, and federal agencies; and corporate and philanthropic partners who are working to end veteran homelessness. Through a combination of training, technical assistance, and product development, the TA Center works to educate and build the capacity of this varied group of stakeholders. Our approach focuses on strengthening the connection between research and practice. We encourage the use of best practices and promote innovation to address new and recurring challenges.

The TA Center serves as a liaison between program funders (both public and private) and the grantee organizations they oversee. The TA Center has a long history of providing technical assistance to VA and DOL grantees. Currently, we provide TA as a subcontractor on the Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (DOL-VETS) and Supportive Services for Veteran Families (VA) programs. Through our work with HVRP, the TA Center has been a consistent, and often the only, champion for the importance of employment in ending homelessness among veterans.

The NCHV Central Office staff also offers service providers assistance with administrative organization and program development; information about government, foundation and corporate grants; and guidance to ensure compliance with federal and state regulations. We operate a toll-free homeless veterans assistance phone line and a comprehensive website to direct those who need help to the people who can provide it.

We know our nation’s care providers are busy serving veterans every day, so we are here to make sure they never have to worry that resources will run out. Our staff of dedicated professionals is solely focused on ending veteran homelessness. We work to achieve our mission by promoting collaboration, shaping policy, building service capacity, ensuring accountability, and managing a referral helpline for veterans experiencing and at-risk of homelessness.

We are the resource and technical assistance center for a national network of community-based service providers and local, state, and federal agencies that provide housing, employment services, case management, legal aid, and other supportive services to thousands of veterans experiencing or at-risk of homelessness each year.

Here are a few of the things we’ve done to support efforts to end homelessness for veterans:

• During the 1990s, NCHV helped VA to draft the VA Homeless Providers Grant and Per Diem Program (GPD), the country’s first community-based grant exclusively devoted to stabilizing homeless veterans for permanent housing and community reintegration. In 2014, NCHV was able to secure a permanent authorization from Congress for the Grant and Per Diem (GPD) program, which provides needed services and a bridge out of homelessness for tens of thousands of homeless veterans each year. This means that there is no longer uncertainty, year after year, in organizations that successfully use this GPD resource to help homeless veterans in their local communities. NCHV tirelessly advocated for the passage of this legislation and continues to serve as the main agency protecting this critical community investment.

•Offering a hand up out of homelessness through the world of work: NCHV helped secure increased appropriations for the Department of Labor-Veterans Employment and Training Service (DOL-VETS) Homeless Veteran Reintegration Program (HVRP) from $3 million in FY1998 to over $50 million today, the highest level ever for the program.

•Fighting for housing resources for the most vulnerable veterans: In 2011, NCHV ensured reinstatement of $75 million in HUD-VASH that had been zeroed out. In 2015, NCHV made the case for Congress to fund an additional 6,500 HUD-VASH vouchers when the President had requested none. By getting these reinstated HUD-VASH vouchers in 2011 and 2015, we were able to secure an additional 18,500 housing resources for veterans who are chronically homeless and have complicated needs. Without this push from NCHV, no new vouchers would have happened in 2011 or in 2015.

• Advocates know that the best ways to end homelessness are to prevent it and build a system of care that can respond rapidly if someone falls into homelessness. NCHV is a tireless advocate for the Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) program. Thanks in part to our advocacy for this resource, the SSVF program has grown from $85 million to over $400 million every year, allowing for hundreds of thousands of veterans and their families in dire need to access rapid housing and stability.

• During the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic in 2020 we obtained $700 million in additional Emergency funds for VA’s Homeless Veteran Programs: $602 million for Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF), $88 million for Grant and Per Diem (GPD), $10 million for Health Care.

Our ultimate goal is to ensure that the remaining 37,800 veterans who are still unsheltered find a permanent home and our mission will not end until we accomplish that feat.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans (NCHV) is the only nationally-based organization solely focused on finding effective solutions for ending veteran homelessness and plays the role of convener and advocate for member organizations. Our membership consists of a variety of organizations, from large multi-state agencies all the way down to smaller community-based providers.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    NCHV has sought feedback through the use of surveys and focus groups with key constituencies such as homeless veterans, landlords, and member organizations. The data compiled from these focus groups have been used to develop guides on best practices, released as reports, or highlighted through various media technologies. These conversations have helped identify programmatic or regulatory hurdles that have hindered the work of service providers or been barriers homeless veterans have had to overcome to become stably housed and have led to the development of workable solutions that address these issues.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our ability to successfully solicit feedback through a multipronged approach has been instrumental in gathering information for all our various constituents and uplifting the voices of a particularly vulnerable population -- homeless veterans. All the feedback NCHV has received has improved our ability to: Improve collaboration at the local, state, and national levels; Shape federal policy through Congressional legislation and federal regulatory changes; Build service provider capacity; Learn about the demand for additional training opportunities; Advocate for additional resources; and Hold key stakeholders accountable for making progress on ending veteran homelessness.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Coalition for Homeless Veterans

Board of directors
as of 01/31/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Steve Benz

John Altenburg

Greenberg Traurig

Steve Benz

Arnold & Porter

Matthew Leslie

Virginia Department of Veterans Services

Wendy McClinton

Black Veterans for Social Justice, Inc

Cathrene Nichols

Washington State Department of Veterans Affairs

Vincent Perrone

Veterans Inc.

Patrick Ryan

Pat Ryan Consulting LLC

Janet Stringfellow

Volunteers of America of Florida

Thomas Bowman

Retired, Deputy Secretary U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs

Debbie Burkart

National Equity Fund

Marlon Ferguson

Southwest Pennsylvania Regional Director for United States Senator Bob Casey

Victoria Lee

Booz Allen Hamilton

Berdie Cowser

Center for Veterans Issues Ltd.

Stephen Peck

President & CEO of U.S. Vets

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 1/31/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Multi-Racial/Multi-Ethnic (2+ races/ethnicities)
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/26/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.