GOLD2023

CAMPAIGN FOR TOBACCO-FREE KIDS

WASHINGTON, DC   |  http://www.tobaccofreekids.org

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Mission

Our vision is a healthier and more equitable future for all. We passionately champion and advocate for evidence-based policies that protect children, improve health and save the most lives.

Ruling year info

1996

President & CEO

Ms. Yolonda C. Richardson

Main address

1400 I STREET NW Suite 1200

WASHINGTON, DC 20005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-1969967

NTEE code info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (W01)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (E01)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (E12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids leads the fight to protect kids and save lives from tobacco use, both in the United States and around the world.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Youth Advocates of the Year Awards Gala

Each year, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids' Youth Advocates of the Year Awards Gala honors youth advocates, tobacco-control champions, and distinguished guests in a grand celebration and awards program.

Population(s) Served

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids bring National Youth Ambassadors – outstanding youth who are tobacco control leaders in their states – to Washington for the week to engage them, train them, and take them to Capitol Hill. The Ambassadors visits their Representatives and Senators offices where they asked their Members of Congress not to support the cigar or grandfather riders.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

To achieve our mission, we:

o Promote public policies proven to reduce tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke. These include higher tobacco taxes, comprehensive smoke-free laws, well-funded tobacco prevention and stop-smoking programs, and tough regulation of tobacco products and marketing.
o Expose and counter tobacco industry efforts to market to children and mislead the public.
o Strengthen tobacco control efforts in the United States and worldwide by providing support and information to our many partners.
o Mobilize organizations and individuals to join the fight against tobacco.
o Empower a tobacco-free generation by fostering youth leadership and activism.
o Inform the public, policy makers and the media about tobacco's devastating consequences and the effectiveness of the policies we support.

Since 1996, the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids has advocated for scientifically proven, cost-effective solutions that prevent kids from smoking, help smokers quit and protect non-smokers from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. We know how to win the fight against tobacco and the progress we have make since our founding demonstrates that these solutions work. We accept no government or tobacco industry funding and rely on contributions from individuals, philanthropic foundations, corporations and other non-profit organizations.

Smoking rates in the U.S. have fallen from over 42% in 1965 to 15% today. Smoking rates among youth have fallen from over 36% in 1997 to 8% today. In the U.S., 30 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, plus hundreds of cities and counties, have enacted strong smoke-free laws. A growing number of countries around the world have passed strong smoke-free laws.

Tobacco use is the number one cause of preventable death in the United States and around the world. If current trends continue, tobacco use will kill one billion people in the 21st century. Every year, tobacco kills more than 400,000 Americans and nearly six million people worldwide. Tobacco use causes some of the most feared and costly diseases, including cancer, heart disease and emphysema. It harms reproductive health and damages nearly every organ in the human body. We will not quit until every child is tobacco-free and we have eliminated the death and disease caused by tobacco.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

CAMPAIGN FOR TOBACCO-FREE KIDS
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

CAMPAIGN FOR TOBACCO-FREE KIDS

Board of directors
as of 09/21/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

William D. Novelli

McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University

Christopher Conley

Lapis Advisors, LP

Doug Ulman

Pelotonia

Bechara Choucair

Kaiser Permanente

Nancy Brown

American Heart Association

Mike Moore

Mike Moore Law Firm, LLC

Matthew L. Myers

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Jonah Shacknai

Skinbetter Science, L'Oreal (USA)

Jacqueline Bolt

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Eileen Howard Boone

Booneday Advisors

William Novelli

Georgetown University

Beverly J. May

Community Health Advocate

Tim Riester

RIESTER

Yolonda Richardson

Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids

Patrice A. Harris

eMed

Agamroop Kaur

2022 Barrie Fiske National Youth Advocate of the Year

Lisa Lacasse

American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network

Melissa Schulman

CVS Health

DJ Yearwood

2023 Barrie Fiske National Youth Advocate of the Year

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/21/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/21/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.