GREAT AND SMALL

When I ride, I soar

Boyds, MD   |  www.greatandsmallride.org

Mission

Great and Small provides equine-assisted activities and therapies to children and adults with a wide range of physical, developmental, and emotional disabilities.  Through the therapeutic effect of equine interaction, we seek to develop the full potential of our riders.  We believe that the essential qualities of power and sensitivity embodied in the horse can strengthen and empower persons of all ages and abilities.

Ruling year info

1998

Executive Director

Alexis Leonard

Main address

17320 Moore Rd

Boyds, MD 20841 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-2012519

NTEE code info

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Animal Related Activities N.E.C. (D99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Great and Small exists to help people live the lives they want to live. How that manifests depends very much on the goals of the individual. It can mean increased physical strength to allow an individual to be more mobile at home and in the community. It can mean improved sensory processing and communication that allow an individual to express their needs and wants, hopes and dreams. It can mean providing a recreational and competitive outlet for people who are often excluded from those opportunities. We're working toward a world where everyone is included and valued.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Therapeutic Riding

Therapeutic horseback riding and horsemanship for children and adults with a wide range of physical, emotional, and cognitive challenges, including special programs for school and community groups serving the special needs population.

Population(s) Served
People with disabilities
At-risk youth

EFP is an interactive process in which a licensed mental health professional works with an equine professional and suitable horses to address psychotherapy goals through a variety of unmounted activities.

Population(s) Served
People with psychosocial disabilities
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

PATH Premier Accredited Center 2019

Affiliations & memberships

Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Excellence in programming is our primary goal. We want to see all our therapeutic riding participants progressing in their riding skills session by session. Mastering a sport spills over into other areas of the participants' lives, including confidence, resilience, and problem-solving.

We are collecting data on outcome measures for therapeutic riding participants. This is an emerging area in our industry, so evaluation methods are still being tested and validated. Our first year of data will be complete in spring 2016. The results of the data collection will inform how we set goals for participants, train staff, and design further data collection to better objectively measure the subjective successes we see every day.

Our instructional staff and therapy horses team together to teach riding skills to our participants with special needs. Great and Small invests in the professional development of our staff so that we can continue to provide the highest-quality instructional services possible. We also invest in our therapy horses with quality nutrition, regular veterinary and farrier care, and complementary therapies.

We have implemented an objective assessment of riding skills to measure outcomes among our therapeutic riding participants. We only have a few years of data available but better than 80% of our participants make progress in a soft skill (confidence, physical ability, communication, etc.) each session, in addition to the riding skills gained.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We introduced vocational skills programs as a direct result of client feedback

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

GREAT AND SMALL
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

GREAT AND SMALL

Board of directors
as of 11/30/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Susan King

Susan King

Caulkins & Bruce, PC

Al Blount

Connie Eysenck

Karen Merzsei

Sue Sheridan

Nancy Heller

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/30/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, or other sexual orientations in the LGBTQIA+ community
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data