Life Pieces To Masterpieces

Creating Art . . . Changing Lives

aka LPTM   |   Washington, DC   |  http://lifepieces.org

Mission

Life Pieces To Masterpieces uses artistic expression to develop character and leadership, unlock innate potential, and prepare African American boys and young men to transform their lives and communities. Our vision is that LPTM gentlemen will be catalysts for positive change in their communities and the world. Life Pieces was the first arts-based program in the nation specifically geared toward African American boys from age 3 through adolescence to young adulthood, and has been going strong for 23 years, impacting the lives of more than 2,000 young men. In an area of the nation’s capital where the rate of public high school graduation for "at-risk" youth is only 58%, 100% of the boys who participate in Life Pieces through their senior year graduate from high school.

Ruling year info

2003

Executive Director

Ms. Mary Edith Brown

Main address

5600 Eads Street, NE - 4th floor

Washington, DC 20019 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-2076894

NTEE code info

Arts, Cultural Organizations - Multipurpose (A20)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2018, 2017 and 2016.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

After school Arts & Education Program

The LPTM Arts & Education Program (AEP) provides critical out-of-school time for youth to explore creative expression (visual art, poetry, music, videography), character development, physical exercise (yoga, dance, soccer, basketball), and academic advancement (rigorous homework assistance and reading and math tutoring by 40+ student volunteers from local universities). The 4-hour/day program runs Monday through Friday and serves 60 youth ages 3 to 13 from seven Title I schools in Wards 7 and 8. In addition, apprentices (youth participants) are mentored by male adults and LPTM Junior Mentors – older teens who are part of LPTM’s Saturday Academy/Brothers In Power program. Apprentices in the AEP receive a snack and supper as well as transportation to the program and home, ensuring their safe travel through dangerous neighborhoods. The proven Human Development System that undergirds all LPTM programming is uniquely effective in supporting young African American men and boys to build a positive sense of identity and develop the tools needed to navigate through challenging circumstances, prepare for their own futures, and give back to their communities.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
People of African descent

Saturday Academy/ Brothers In Power (“BIP”) provides high school students ages 14 to 18 with college and career readiness training to help prepare them for post-secondary success. Over the course of nine months, students meet three Saturdays per month from 10 am – 3 pm for workshops focusing on black male development and important life skills for college bound students, including communication, resume writing, interview training, essay writing, financial management, study skills, and college preparedness. Workshops, which include breakfast and lunch, take place at The George Washington University (GWU), giving students exposure to a college campus. Brothers In Power (the Saturday Academy participants) also mentor the younger apprentices in the LPTM’s after-school and summer programs. For the past decade, 100% of our high school seniors have graduated and gone on to college or career-specific training.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
People of African descent

LPTM's summer program engages apprentices (youth participants) ages 3-14 daily from June to August in the study of a foreign country - its culture, languages, art, dress, sports, food, families, schools and key events impacting its people. Activities include reading books about the country being studied and writing plays inspired by stories in the books. Apprentices work collaboratively on paintings, poetry, music, and dances that represent the country, and present their productions at the program’s closing ceremony. Junior Mentors from the Saturday Academy/Brothers In Power program provide individual math and literacy tutoring for the younger boys, helping to prevent summer learning loss.

Population(s) Served
Men and boys
People of African descent

Color Me Community Workshops are part of the organization’s earned income program. Informed by LPTM’s 23 years of experience in human development, the workshops provide a safe, non-judgemental environment for people of all backgrounds and identities to explore the implications of race, gender, sexual orientation, cultural background and identity in our daily interactions. These highly interactive workshops facilitate participants in exploring the lenses through which they see life; and without guilt, blame or shame, identify the “isms” that keep them from being fully connected to others who do not share their race, nationality, beliefs, lifestyles, or socio-economic status. Workshops for businesses, government agencies, and community organizations have consistently enabled individuals across cultures to explore racial equity, inclusion and implicit biases in such a way that they can begin to see and experience themselves and others as an integral and valued part of shared humanity. At the end of the workshop, participants collaborate to create artwork in the Life Pieces art style, communicating an action they will take to inspire positive change and a vision of shared humanity in their own lives and the world. Workshop clients include the World Bank, the U.S. State Department, national and local nonprofit organizations, and local government agencies.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Art by Life Pieces - "Creating Art...Changing Lives". LPTM Apprentices have created artistic masterpieces for 23 years, and their artwork has been displayed in such venues as Children's National Medical Center, The World Bank, NBC's Today Show, Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, DC Mayor's Office, and private Foundations throughout the District of Columbia. Each colorful, sewn, acrylic-on-canvas collage illustrates a shared story and reflects the Apprentices' courage to create their own destiny - and turn their "life pieces" into a "masterpiece". Art by Life Pieces provides a source of earned income from sales of LPTM paintings and fine apparel derived from the paintings. In 2018, we successfully introduced high quality LPTM art-derived ladies’ scarves and men’s and boy’s ties to the market.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Top 100 MBE's 2019

Capital Region Minority Supplier Development Council

Affiliations & memberships

Top 100 MBE's 2019

Leadership Greater Washington 2019

DC Alliance for Youth Advocates 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total number of works in collection

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Children and youth, People of African descent

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Each colorful, sewn, acrylic-on-canvas collage illustrates a shared story and reflects our youth “apprentices”' courage to create their own destiny - and turn their life pieces into a masterpiece.

Total number of works developed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Children and youth, People of African descent

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

LPTM youth collaborate to decide on a life experience to make the topic of their painting and then make their masterpiece together by painting, cutting, arranging, and sewing pieces of canvas.

Number of works exhibited temporarily

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Art by Life Pieces

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of youth who demonstrate critical thinking skills (e.g., reasoning, analysis)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Children and youth, People of African descent

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Youth participants use the LPTM Human Development System principles and Shield of Faith decision-making tool daily to analyze choices and inform positive behavior – observed by staff, school, parents.

Hours of programing delivered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Men and boys, Children and youth, People of African descent

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

This metric encompasses After School Arts & Education, Summer program and Saturday Academy program. Data for 2020 reflect delivering a hybrid virtual, in-person indoors and in-person outdoors program.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Life Pieces to Masterpieces strives to reach the goal of having 100% of our apprentices graduate high school and go on to secondary education as well as grow into responsible, intelligent, engaged gentlemen, scholars, artists and athletes who are able to create their own destiny. The goal of the LPTM human development system is to create positive, forward thinking decision makers who are able to overcome difficult situations. Our artistic system strives to allow our apprentices to release their emotions and experiences through artistic expression. The goal of the educational system is to advance our apprentices and engage them in higher education.
Life Pieces To Masterpieces educates our apprentices to be global citizens as well. Our young boys and men learn that they are part of a far-reaching community and are introduced and exposed to different cultures.

Life Pieces To Masterpieces’ work is based on the theory that any human being with a strong foundation (purpose, premise and process) and the proper tools has the power to create his or her own destiny.

LPTM Human Development System is a concrete set of beliefs that address the challenges that our young people and their families face through artistic expression, increased self-awareness, and positive decision-making. It is a proven system that has elevated our apprentices to discover a more positive perspective focused on preparing for their own future and giving back to their communities.

The LPTM Shield of Faith, inspired by the color wheel, is a decision-making tool that reminds apprentices, mentors, staff members and volunteers of the core values of Life Pieces To Masterpieces. Each value is associated with a color, so that when an apprentice sees a particular color throughout the day, he is reminded of LPTM values. Values include loving, giving, language, arts, discipline, leadership, spirituality and meditation. The Shield serves as a behavior management tool for the young boys; for the older boys it is a jumping off point for deeper discussions about values.

Our Process: LPTM 4 Cs
Life Pieces To Masterpieces employs the 4 Cs as part of our curriculum:

• Students connect to themselves and to their classmates.
• They create -- homework, artwork, and poems.
• They contribute -- sharing their work and their thinking with a greater community.
• And they celebrate their successes.

Our core expertise is in comprehensive youth development for African American boys and young men. We strive to deepen the impact on the academic and life achievements of our young men and boys by teaching them the self-awareness and leadership skills in addition to offering our young men opportunities in art, tutoring and academic enrichment. Our curriculum combines daily participation in art and creative expression with academic tutoring, mentoring, leadership and youth development as well as meditation activities, yoga, volunteering and service experiences. Our proven methods address four specific, critical needs for our young men – Positive role models, closing the achievement gap, artistic expression and knowledge of self – in order to create lasting improvements in the lives of our apprentices. Meeting these critical needs leads to our apprentices being fully receptive to academic learning and achievement.

Our work supports apprentices in turning the many challenges in their lives into opportunities for success, self–reliance, and resiliency. Our entire staff has received extensive training in the District of Columbia’s Advancing Youth Development (AYD) outcomes. Of these outcomes, we track self-efficacy, temporal orientation, safety and structure and membership and belonging. Our curriculum is the vehicle through which our youth development outcomes are achieved. Our methodologies have been recognized by The Catalogue for Philanthropy since 2003, we have been featured in a book called Rhetorics for Community Action by Dr. Phyllis Ryder of George Washington University, and we are currently a finalist of for the Mayor’s Arts Award in the Innovation in the Arts category.

We partner with DC Reads of American University, Education Pioneers, The George Washington University Neighbors Project, Maya Angelou Public Charter School, ARCH Development Organization, and The Washington and Lee University Shepherd Internship program.

We formalized and completed our 5-year Business Plan for Growth (see attached) to achieve our long term goals. Over the next 5 years, we will focus on increasing our number of individual donors from 10% of cash flow to 50% over 5 years through our implementation of the Benevon model. We plan to also:

1. Sustain LPTM by codifying its human development curriculum and methodology so that LPTM’s methodologies can be shared on a broader scale. Georgetown University is partnered with us on this project
2. Leverage and expand art sales and earned revenue through Corporate Art by Life Pieces

100% of our students have graduated from high school and have been accepted to college or post-secondary training.

100% of parents show satisfaction with our program and say their children are more confident, make better decisions, and speak in a positive manner about their future.

90% of apprentices demonstrated improved behaviors

95% of adult alums are employed.

1,000 masterpieces have been created by more than 1,000 boys and young men since our founding in 1996. The artwork has been exhibited in embassies, corporate galleries, and as far away as France and Northern Ireland.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Core Capacity Assessment Tool,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We changed our After School program schedule based on our students' feedback. In the past, they were in stationary classrooms based on their grade level. Now students rotate through different classrooms rather than getting their subject matter in one classroom. Based on students' requests for meditation before each class rather than simply at the end of the day. In the past, Saturday Academy Apprentices were not given a stipend. They expressed that Saturdays We developed the stipend system so that we could support them in their academics, human dev,....

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

Life Pieces To Masterpieces
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Life Pieces To Masterpieces

Board of directors
as of 3/24/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Raymond Covington

Retired/U.S. Patent and Trademark OfficeOffice

Term: 2018 - 2021

Mary Brown

LPTM Co-founder and Executive Director

Lamell McMorris

Greenlining Realty USA

Damon White

Evermay Wealth Management

Susie Stevens

Faith Based Charities in the DC Metropolitan Area

Phyllis Ryder, Ph.D.

George Washington University

Howard Rosenstock, Esq.

Hogan Lovells

Kalahn Taylor-Clark, Ph.D.

Sanofi

Josephine Robinson

HSC Health Care System

Shawn Hardnett

Statesmen Boys

Dylan Tally

Ernst & Young

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? No
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/09/2019

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/09/2019

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.