Center for Adoption Support and Education

nurture. inspire. empower.

aka C.A.S.E.   |   Burtonsville, MD   |  www.adoptionsupport.org

Mission

C.A.S.E. is a national leader in mental health services for the adoption, foster and kinship care community. We improve the lives of children who have been adopted or in foster care and their families through counseling, lifelong education, and a growing national network of trained professionals. We are committed to nurturing, inspiring and empowering adoptive, foster, and kinship families through: 1) trauma-informed, family-focused, adoption-competent clinical and case management services; 2) training and education for families and professionals; 3) advocacy; and 4) research.

Ruling year info

1998

Chief Executive Officer

Ms. Debbie B. Riley LCMFT

Main address

3919 National Drive Suite 200

Burtonsville, MD 20866 USA

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EIN

52-2100734

NTEE code info

Mental Health Treatment (F30)

Adoption (P31)

Foster Care (P32)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Adoption-Competent Mental Health Counseling Services

Each year, C.A.S.E. provides culturally-sensitive, trauma-informed, adoption-competent mental health services to over 600 adoptive, foster and kinship families.

Population(s) Served
Families

Through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Children’s Bureau, C.A.S.E. reaches child welfare and mental health professionals nationwide through web-based training. As of 2021, more than 12,800 professionals in 31 states have been trained.

Population(s) Served
Adults

C.A.S.E. workshops, webinars, and publications are highly-effective tools to help adoptive, foster and kinship families, and the child welfare, mental health, and school-based professionals who support them, navigate the unique challenges they face. C.A.S.E. offers more than 20 trainings which can be customized for families or professionals, and delivered in remotely or in-person. C.A.S.E. is authorized by the National Association of Social Workers to offer Continuing Education Units (CEUs) to child welfare and mental health professionals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

C.A.S.E. partners with Jockey International, Inc. and Jockey Being Family to distribute backpacks, teddy bears and blankets to children newly-adopted through foster care. C.A.S.E. is proud to include resources for parents in the backpacks including the 52 Ways to Talk about Adoption card game, Beneath the Mask book for teens, W.I.S.E. Up! workbooks and free access to our Strengthening Your Family online webinars.

Population(s) Served
Families

Through a grant from the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, C.A.S.E. has two Wendy’s Wonderful Kids recruiters on staff who implement a proactive, child-focused recruitment model targeted exclusively on moving Maryland’s longest-waiting children from foster care into adoptive families.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of participants attending course/session/workshop

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education, Training & Research

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the pandemic, many in-person trainings had to be cancelled but we successfully shifted many online.

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Education, Training & Research

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adoption-Competent Mental Health Counseling Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Due to the pandemic, we shifted exclusively to telehealth delivery of therapy. Not all clients were comfortable with telehealth or thought it worked for their child.

Total number of counseling sessions performed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Adoption-Competent Mental Health Counseling Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

C.A.S.E. envisions that everyone touched by adoption, foster and kinship care has access to the adoption-competent, trauma-informed, family-focused therapy and support necessary to navigate their lifelong journey. While every family encounters challenges, families formed through adoption, guardianship and kinship face special issues related to their unique experience. These families often struggle to find mental health professionals who understand the complex loss, grief, attachment and identity issues they may face. C.A.S.E. has two primary goals: (1) adoptive, foster and kinship families are supported and thriving and (2) trained mental health, child welfare and school professionals are employing adoption-competent practices.

The C.A.S.E. Board of Directors and senior management team developed a five-year strategic plan (2014-2019) as a roadmap for organizational development and service expansion. Due to COVID-19, the strategy was extended through 2020 and the new strategic planning process delayed until 2021. The Board and staff update the plan annually and review progress quarterly, while our management team monitors monthly results. We employ a number of strategies to achieve our mission:
(1) Assess community needs and solicit regular client feedback to ensure we deliver specialized clinical services that contribute to positive outcomes.
(2) Develop and share curricula that is trauma-informed, evidence-based and adoption-competent through a national network of partner organizations to meet the needs of families and child welfare, mental health, and school professionals.
(3) Use an integrated multi-media approach to develop and share educational resources for families and professionals.
(4) Build alliances for advocacy and research at the community, national, and international levels.
(5) Strengthen our financial viability by maximizing efficiency and diversifying our funding to ensure all families receive support, regardless of their ability to pay.

Since our founding in 1998, C.A.S.E. has grown and developed a national reputation for excellence as a provider of unique and specialized products and services to meet the mental health needs of the adoptive, foster, and kinship care communities. We are guided by a caring, passionate 17-member Board of Directors. With six offices and 48 staff, we are the leading provider of therapy, education and training in Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia. We have served more than 6,500 clinical clients and their families to date.

C.A.S.E.'s capabilities are augmented by our national network of partners and excellent relationships with key stakeholders including families, government organizations, private service providers, research institutes, universities, and donors. Launched in 2009, our nationally-recognized Training for Adoption Competency™ (TAC) Program is the only accredited, assessment-based certificate program for mental health professionals on adoption competency in the country. TAC™ includes 72 hours of training with follow-up case consultation to help practitioners apply what they have learned. C.A.S.E. has 17 partners delivering TAC™ to clinicians in 20 states. Our National Adoption Competency Mental Health Training Initiative, funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, has trained more than 12,800 child welfare and mental health professionals through specialized web-based curricula.

The adoptive, foster and kinship families C.A.S.E. serves already face complex mental health challenges, but they worsened due to the pandemic. Never before in our history have we seen such a dramatic rise in the severity of symptoms, particularly the increase in depression and suicidal thoughts and attempts in children and teens. We continue to meet families’ needs for more frequent therapy sessions – with 12% more former clients returning to C.A.S.E. for services in 2020 than the year before. We are also offering more group therapy and support groups as caregivers and teens continue to struggle with the isolation of COVID-19. In 2020, we say nearly a doubling in demand for financial assistance from clients struggling to cover the cost of therapy due to the economic crisis triggered by the pandemic. We provided financial support for 80 clients and their family members - 16% more than 2019. Despite the pandemic and the need for telehealth, we maintained a client satisfaction rating of 95%.

More organizations and professionals turned to C.A.S.E. for support as we launched our National Training Institute to better promote permanency nd well-being for children, provide support across the family life cycle, and enhance the knowledge and skills of professionals. We received accreditation from the Institute for Credentialing Excellence for our Training for Adoption Competency Program. We invite you to join us on our journey to nurture, inspire and empower adoptive, foster and kinship families and the professionals who serve them!

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Center for Adoption Support and Education
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Center for Adoption Support and Education

Board of directors
as of 4/30/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Ms. Heather Quinn

Marketing & Management Professional

Term: 2017 - 2023


Board co-chair

Ms. Kathleen Ravenscroft

Advocate for Vulnerable Children

Term: 2014 - 2023

Michael Dugan

Freestate Electrical Companies

Jelani Freeman

Department of Veterans Affairs

Pamela Krooth, LCSW-C

Adoption Competent Therapist

Tracie Peschke

Former Congressional Staff Member

Maria Garcia Anderson

Anderson Fire Protection, Inc.

Carol Shoemaker

Adoptive Parent

Kathleen Dugan

C.A.S.E. Founder

Chris Marasco

Sandy Spring Bank

Michael Battle

Battle Resource Management, Inc. (BRMi)

Aaron Schuham

U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services

Beverly Woodard

Prince George's County Circuit Court

Uma Ahluwalia

Health Management Associates

Sara van Geertruyden

Thorn Run Partners

Richard Devaney

EagleBank

Rick Powell

PMG

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 04/19/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Decline to state
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data