GOLD2024

Maryland Horse Rescue INC

100% Volunteer, No-Kill

aka Maryland Horse Rescue (formerly HorseNet)   |   Westminster, MD   |  https://mdhorserescue.org

Mission

Our mission is to save as many unfortunate victims of the horse world as we humanly can. We strive to rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome animals whenever and wherever we can. To that end, we will provide care for abused, abandoned, neglected, aged, and unwanted horses or those horses who can no longer be cared for by their owners for whatever reason. We accept them in any condition and do everything in our power to provide needed care and veterinary services.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

Tina Davis

Main address

PO Box 1997

Westminster, MD 21158 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

HorseNet Horse Rescue

EIN

52-2166053

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Maryland Horse Rescue seeks to end cruelty to horses across the country. Over 250,000 horses are affected by hoarding annually, and horses are one of the four most abused animals in the United States. Over 70% of rescues operate at capacity, meaning the need to rescue and rehabilitate horses is going unmet.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Volunteer Training Program

Training sessions are held twice a week for current volunteers that want to improve their horse handling skills.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Maryland Horse Rescue's primary mission is the rehabilitation of abused, neglected, and abandoned horses. Our rehabilitation program includes medical attention, weight stabilization and management, and maintenance of healthy lifestyle for those in our herd.

Population(s) Served
Adults

For the horses in our herd who are rideable, when possible, Maryland Horse Rescue provides training for these horses to enhance their rehoming.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals with freedom from hunger and thirst

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Maximum number of horses in our herd during the year since all rescues were subjected to hunger and thirst prior to rescue

Number of animals with freedom from discomfort

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Maximum number of horses in our herd in a year, since all of our rescues were either neglected, abused, or abandoned

Number of animals with freedom from pain

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Freedom from pain differs from the other metrics in that it specifically identifies the rescues in our herd who were suffering from physical injuries in addition to starvation and dehydration

Number of animals with freedom to express normal behavior

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Training

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All the animals in our herd are able to express normal behavior - running in fields, frolicking with other horses, merging bonds in a herd

Number of animals with freedom from fear and distress

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Maximum number of horses in our herd during the year since all our rescues were living in fear and/or distress and are now free from this mistreatment

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of horses adopted to their forever home while still under our supervision

Number of animals rehabilitated

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of rescues each year

Number of animals monitored post release

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All rehomed horses are monitored post release

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of horses rescued from abuse, neglect, or abandon

Number of animal adoptions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of rescues rehomed and under post-adoption monitoring

Number of animals in collection

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Maximum number of rescues in our herd during the year

Number of animals provided with long term care

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults

Related Program

Horse Rehabilitation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Number of long-term residents (defined as 1 or more years) in our herd - not all of our herd is eligible for adoption based on veterinary assessment and rehoming blind and/or elder horses is difficult

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Maryland Horse Rescue's goals are to rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome horses, while educating the public and training volunteers. We aim to form nationwide partnerships and a network of trained horse rescuers to end the cruelty to horses. Expanding the network allows us to identify and expose maltreatment of horses, and find ways to rectify the situation and end the abuse.\r\n\r\nTo date, we have accepted abused horses from Kentucky, horses subjected to animal hoarding in Minnesota, neglected horses from West Virginia and Pennsylvania, and abused, neglected, and hoarded horses from Maryland. Maryland Horse Rescue then rehabilitates the horses with the goal of rehoming to make space available to repeat the process.

Maryland Horse Rescue employs multiple strategies to achieve our goal of reducing and eventually eliminating horse cruelty. The first is the expansion of our network. The more partnerships we form with other rescuers, the wider the net we cast to identify and rectify the problem. In addition to expanding our existing relationships, our board members attend annual conferences and training workshops that include representatives from rescues across the country.\r\n\r\nOur second strategy is to form an educated and well-trained team of rescue workers. All volunteers undergo an initial training session exposing them to the needs we meet and the services we provide. Each volunteer then dedicates time to at least one weekday morning or evening shift. During these shifts, volunteers are educated on proper horse care and maintenance. Additional training is provided on an adhoc basis to meet the needs of the health conditions of our herd. Grants allow us to provide our volunteers with Natural Horsemanship training from Parelli certified trainers. \r\n\r\nOur third strategy is to expand knowledge and awareness by reaching out to the public. We participate in community events, providing information and education to the local community. We hold festivals and fundraising activities at our farm, encouraging participation from the community that includes education on how to identify horse abuse, neglect, and abandonment, and who to contact to end the cruelty.

We are 100% volunteer run, and our volunteers provide us with the capability of making our organization effective. We currently have more volunteers than horses in our herd! Our volunteers help us to not only rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome horses, but they also expand our network by attending community events, nationwide conferences, and spreading awareness. Maryland Horse Rescue volunteers are dedicated to our mission and always rise to the occasion to meet our needs when they grow.\r\n\r\nMaryland Horse Rescue is currently supported by donations. Without our donors, none of our work would be possible. We are currently seeking to expand our efforts through the application for grants and awards. Our operating capacity is 35 horses based on our current level of donations and fundraising. With additional funds accumulated through more donations, grants, and awards, we will be able to increase our capacity. Our facilities can accommodate additional horses, but not without additional funding.

Thus far we have a 100% success rate at rehabilitating horses under our care. There are between 32 and 35 horses in our herd at any given time. Additionally, we measure success based on the number of horses we are able to rehome. In 2017, we were able to rehome 9 horses. In 2018, we are already on track to surpass that goal. Each horse that is rehomed opens an available slot for another horse to be rescued and rehabilitated. \r\n\r\nAdditional funds increase our capacity. Increasing our capacity means we can rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome even more horses. We will continue our 100% rehabilitation success rate, and continue to rehome approximately 30% of our herd annually. The count of horses we can save is dependent on our funding. Increased funding increases the count.

Financials

Maryland Horse Rescue INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Maryland Horse Rescue INC

Board of directors
as of 02/01/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Melanie Biemiller

No Affiliation

Tina Davis

Cheryl Papsch

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/1/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability