AMAZON CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION

aka Amazon Conservation   |   Washington, DC   |  www.amazonconservation.org

Mission

We unite science, innovation and people to protect the Amazon—the greatest wild forest on earth.

Ruling year info

2000

Executive Director

John Beavers

Main address

1012 14th Street NW Suite 625

Washington, DC 20005 USA

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EIN

52-2211305

NTEE code info

Natural Resource Conservation and Protection (C30)

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Forest Conservation (C36)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Amazon Rainforest plays a critical role as a carbon sink, mediator of the global water cycle and cradle of biodiversity. Massive loss of the Amazon rainforest would have catastrophic consequences not only for the 30+ million people living in the region but also for the planet. Illegal mining, an encroaching agricultural frontier, expanding infrastructure projects like poorly-planned roads, and illegal logging are some of the key factors that threaten the integrity of the forests of the Amazon and the species that call it home. Climate change will exacerbate the impacts from the threats in the region. Research shows that the Amazon is reaching a tipping point due to deforestation where it will no longer be able to produce its own rainfall, resulting in large swathes of the forest become a savanna. The Amazon still maintains vast tracts of intact, mega-diverse, and carbon-rich forests that need to be protected in the face of these escalating threats.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Overview of our Programs

Our holistic approach focuses on:
1. Protecting Wild Places: We safeguard over 9.1 million acres of forest by creating and supporting a network of public and privately owned lands to keep vital habitats connected and increase the chance for species to survive. The biodiversity of this area provides a living laboratory to study the effects of climate change.
2. Empowering People: We work hand-in-hand with communities, governments, and indigenous peoples to provide technical support, innovative tools, and technology to ensure enduring conservation solutions. We help communities implement sustainable forest-friendly businesses, and we train the next generation of conservationists at our research stations and beyond.
3. Putting Science and Technology to Work for Conservation: We harness the power of satellite and drone technology to detect and stop deforestation across the Amazon basin. Our science provides key information for governments and communities to make decisions and take action.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples
Working poor
Farmers
Adolescents

Amazon Conservation's work began when we established the world’s first conservation concession, Los Amigos, deep in the Peruvian Amazon where illegal gold mining runs rampant. Once a logging concession, we have converted Los Amigos’ 360,000 acres of forest into a conservation haven and have kept it protected for two decades now through the innovative model we created. This model has since been applied to forests around the world. We now directly protect over 9.1 million acres of forest by creating, supporting, and managing protected areas - a multiyear, complex process requiring partnerships with local governments and communities. But our impact does not end there. We also work in the buffer zones of national parks and indigenous reserves to strengthen their management and in the vast land between conservation areas to ensure connectivity between vital ecosystems, ensuring species can move and thus adapt to changing habitats and climate.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples
Academics
Emergency responders

We work alongside local forest producers, families and indigenous groups on initiatives that protect biodiversity and improve their well-being and economic stability. We support sustainable livelihoods in their full cycle, from growing and harvesting forest products to strengthening business skills and making market connections that build local capacity to sustainably manage their forests.

Our Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) works with local concessionaires and indigenous communities to protect their productive forests and territories, providing them with real-time satellite data and the capacity to track and report illegal activities, essential to effectively protect their forests.

We lead high-impact environmental education programs for children in Peru and Bolivia, inspiring students and their families to protect the Amazon, and we provide scholarships for young biologists to conduct field studies at our research stations in Peru, filling a critical education gap.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples
Low-income people
Farmers

By sharing crucial data on the increasing threats affecting the Amazon, we help shape the changes in policy and practice that minimize future deforestation and promote conservation. To this end, we own three premier research stations in Peru (Los Amigos, Villa Carmen/ Manu, and Wayqecha) and support two research stations in Bolivia (Tahuamanu and Santa Rosa del Abuná), where we host hundreds of international scientists and students, conduct biological monitoring, document endangered species using camera traps, and provide educational opportunities for local communities.

We also deploy the latest technology to monitor and stop threats in the Amazon through our MAAP initiative that tracks deforestation, fires, and climate change impact across 100% of the Amazon and delivers it to key authorities who can take action on the ground. Our drone center further provides local people the training and technology needed to protect their forests using high-tech tools.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Indigenous peoples
Academics
Emergency responders

Where we work

Awards

One of the Best Small Nonprofits 2009/2010 2009

Catologue for Philanthropy Greater Washington

4 Star Rating 2013

Charity Navigator

4 Star Rating 2014

Charity Navigator

4 Star Rating 2015

Charity Navigator

4 Star Rating 2016

Charity Navigator

4 Star Rating 2017

Charity Navigator

4 Star Rating 2018

Charity Navigator

Best Nonprofits to Donate to Amazon Wildfires 2019

Charity Navigator

Leadership & Adaptability Beacon 2020

Charity Navigator

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of acres of land protected

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people, Academics, Emergency responders

Related Program

Empowering People

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of acres protected through the creation and/or management of conservation areas in Peru and Bolivia

Acres of land that gain formal protection status

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Indigenous peoples, Academics

Related Program

Empowering People

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

To date number of new protected areas we helped establish in Peru and Bolivia with support from local communities and governments.

Number of trees planted

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Health, Farmers

Related Program

Empowering People

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of trees we planted to date, using our community-based reforestation methods, to restore damaged habitats

Number of IUCN Red List species with habitats in areas affected by operations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Indigenous peoples, Academics

Related Program

Empowering People

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

Number of IUCN-classified endemic and/ or endangered species protected that have been identified in the areas we help safeguard.

Number of species in collection

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Indigenous peoples, Academics

Related Program

Empowering People

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of species cataloged in our three research stations in Peru

Number of carbon emissions prevented (estimated by CO2 equivalent)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Overview of our Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of Mg C stored in the ground in the conservation areas we helped establish and maintain.

Number of press articles published

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Emergency responders, Farmers

Related Program

Overview of our Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of articles written during each year about our organization raising awareness of the issues in the Amazon

Number of people trained

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Indigenous peoples, Economically disadvantaged people, Farmers

Related Program

Protecting Wild Places

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Estimated number of individuals trained to date on conservation best practices

Number of briefings or presentations held

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Putting Science and Technology to Work for Conservation

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total number of public real-time deforestation monitoring analyses and private briefings developed and distributed to expose deforestation in the Amazon and drive action on the ground.

Number of groups/individuals benefiting from tools/resources/education materials provided

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups, Indigenous peoples, Farmers, Emergency responders

Related Program

Protecting Wild Places

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of individuals directly benefiting from the conservation areas we helped establish and maintain to date.

Number of acres of deforestation exposed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Putting Science and Technology to Work for Conservation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of acres of deforestation exposed each year using our real-time deforestation monitoring system of satellites and drones

Number of acres of forest impacted by wildfires

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Age groups

Related Program

Putting Science and Technology to Work for Conservation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Acres monitored per year, identified through real-time satellite imagery by our Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project. Metric not tracked before 2020.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our vision is simple: we work toward creating a thriving Amazon that sustains the full diversity of life. We use our holistic approach focusing on people, nature, and innovation to create enduring conservation solutions to protect this vital place for all of humanity.

Amazon Conservation employs a holistic approach focused on protecting wild places, empowering people, and putting science and technology to work for conservation.

1. Protecting Wild Places
Currently, we safeguard over 9.1 million acres of wild forest in the most biodiverse place on Earth. The altitudinal range of this area provides a living laboratory for understanding and mitigating the effects of climate change. We protect this forest by creating and supporting a network of public and privately owned lands, which maintain the connection among vital habitats and increase the chance for species to survive.

2. Empowering People
As a trusted partner, we work hand-in-hand with communities, governments, and indigenous peoples to provide technical support, innovative tools, and technology to ensure enduring conservation solutions. We help communities implement profitable and sustainable forest-friendly businesses. Finally, we train the next generation of conservationists at our three research stations and beyond.

3. Putting Science and Technology to Work for Conservation
Science informs our conservation actions. We harness the power of satellite and drone technology to detect and stop deforestation across the entire Amazon basin. We manage one of the most important networks of biological stations in the tropics, which are hubs for research and discovery. Our science provides key information that governments and communities need to make decisions and take action.

Amazon Conservation has been a pioneer in conserving forests since 1999, and has a proven track record of empowering people, protecting wild places and putting science and technology to work for conservation.

Our founding program provided support for Brazil nut harvesters in Peru as an incentive for protecting the forest. Amazon Conservation is responsible for creating the world’s first private conservation concession in 2001, a 360,000 acre reserve on government land that Amazon Conservation protects and manages for conservation. Amazon Conservation also supported the creation and management of Peru’s first conservation concession managed by an indigenous community. In total, we now protect over 9.1 million acres of forest.

Our 3 research stations act as hubs for science and discovery in the Amazon. They also protect over 10,000 acres of Amazonian forests, much of which is also designated protected conservation areas, and buffer critical protected areas in the landscape. These stations provide us with a constant presence where it’s needed most - in the field - that few international nonprofits possess.

Amazon Conservation’s vast technology for conservation programming has become essential for deforestation monitoring and on-the-ground responses to threats against the Amazon. We have developed over 145 publicly-available reports and over 150 confidential reports to provide real-time deforestation analysis to policymakers, local authorities, and the general public, empowering them with the information and data needed to take action.

Our extensive work in the region has provided us with a network of local partners within multiple government agencies at the local, regional and national levels that are essential to achieving conservation goals. Through our partnerships, we have created new protected areas; prevented, minimized, and stopped deforestation; supported sustainable livelihoods that earn communities an income while protecting forest; and supported scientific research projects that measure everything from climate change impacts to bird behavior.

We operate as an alliance with two sister organizations in Peru and Bolivia who implement our projects on the ground. Through this alliance, we have built invaluable long-term relationships with local stakeholders and became part of the Amazonian communities we support. With 101 employees across 7 offices in the US, Peru and Bolivia, we ensure that our local solutions are serving the unique needs of the western Amazon while keeping an eye out for new technology and scientific discoveries on a global scale.

Amazon Conservation has a 20-year history in the region, strong local and regional support, and an unwavering commitment to continuing to work in this vital area, making us well-positioned to continuing and scaling our conservation efforts across the Amazon basin.

Amazon Conservation measures its impact across the land we protect, awareness we build, communities we serve, and research and education we provide. Some highlights of our success on the ground include:
- Protected 9.1 million acres of forests and wild places in the western Amazon through helping create and maintain conservation areas.
- Benefitted over 17,000 individuals who live in the 30+ conservation areas we helped create and maintain.
- Established the Los Amigos Conservation Concession, the world’s first conservation concession, protecting 360,000 acres of forests and creating a conservation model that is now implemented in other areas of the Amazon and the world.
- Helped establish the Haramba Queros Ecological Preserve, the world's first indigenous conservation concession managed by an indigenous group.
- Trained over 1,000 harvester families in the sustainable harvesting of Brazil nuts and their post-production. We also have assisted communities as they formed associations to sell Brazil nuts and other forest-friendly products and handicrafts.
- Developed a program to address human-jaguar conflicts in Bolivia, providing education and outreach programs to nearly 500 adults and children to dispel myths and create wildlife management alternatives.
- Built Peru’s first permanent research center focused on Andean cloud forest ecology, Wayqecha Biological Station.
- Launched a new Wildlife Conservation Laboratory at our Los Amigos Biological Station in Peru, which aims to carry out wildlife health and biodiversity monitoring using the latest technology. This lab gathers vital data on zoonotic diseases and transmission risks in the region in a first step toward creating a replicable decentralized, locally-based One Health laboratory network.
- Created a real-time remote monitoring system using satellite technology to detect, analyze, and expose deforestation and fires as they happen. Our Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) uses cutting-edge satellite data from a variety of sources, including NASA, to analyze and share deforestation information that enables local authorities to take action against forest crimes.
- Developed the Southwest Amazon Drone Center, which has trained over 150 community members, government officials, and forest users in using drone technology to find and expose illegal deforestation.
- Collected data about mammal, bird, insect, and plant species in our three research stations in the Peruvian Amazon, registering over 7,000 species within their borders.
- Partnered with indigenous communities in Peru and Bolivia as well as local partners supporting indigenous groups in Ecuador to improve their capacity to protect their ancestral lands.
- In key protected areas we support, we worked to establish climate resilience and adaptation plans to address the impacts from a changing climate including fires and flooding.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Amazon Conservation serves a wide array of stakeholders, from local people and indigenous groups in the Amazon; to government agencies in Peru and Bolivia; to fellow NGOs in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru; to scientists, universities, and students around the world; to wildlife and flora across the Amazon Basin; to global citizens at large benefitting from the ecological and economic services provided to all by a healthy Amazon.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    During the pandemic, some of our beneficiaries in Bolivia gave us feedback that, rather than Zoom meetings that are reliant on stable internet that is not always available in their communities, meetings and communications via the app WhatApp would be easier for them logistically. Based on this feedback, we began to use this app for trainings and communications, and we also started to produce short animated videos that can be shared via WhatsApp to raise awareness of key conservation topics. With this feedback, we also increased our outreach to communities by radio, a core communication method in Amazonian communities. We’re now producing a radionovela (a “soap opera”-style radio series) that focuses on what climate change is, how it affects local people, and how to build resilience.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    After 20 years in the Amazon, we have built strong relationships with local communities, indigenous groups, government agencies, NGOs, and other stakeholders, enabling us to receive honest and transparent feedback. Through both informal and formal feedback gathering, we aim to grow our relationship with stakeholders as equals. We emphasize that our nonprofit is local, with local experts employed to achieve local conservation goals, and that we also have a stake in keeping the Amazon thriving. We emphasize the role of local people in conservation by empowering them, building capacity, and providing key tools to protect their own forests. This approach helps shape our strategy in decision-making, resource-sharing, relationship-building, and feedback-gathering, shifting power to local people.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time,

Financials

AMAZON CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AMAZON CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION

Board of directors
as of 11/5/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Jim Brumm


Board co-chair

Eduardo Forno

Miles Silman

Wake Forest University

Enrique Ortiz

Director Emeritus; Andes Amazon Fund

Bruce Babbitt

Former US Secretary of Interior

Steve Voorhees

Teichos Energy

Thomas Lovejoy

George Mason University

Amy Rosenthal

The Field Museum

Eduardo Forno

Conservation International Bolivia

Doug Sarno

Forum Facilitation Group

Jim Brumm

Glastonbury Commons Ltd

Manuel Pulgar Vidal

WWF

Adrian Forsyth

Director Emeritus; Strategic Advisor, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and Andes Amazon Fund

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/04/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/04/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.