TIME FOR CHANGE FOUNDATION

We call it home, others call it hope

San Bernardino, CA   |  www.timeforchangefoundation.org

Mission

The mission of Time for Change Foundation is to empower disenfranchised low income individuals and families by building leadership through evidence-based programs and housing to create self-sufficiency and thriving communities. Housing is a fundamental right Treatment not Punishment Developing Women Leaders is critical for community development Advocacy and Community Organizing to dismantle the structures that harm our communities Every Vote Counts Reuniting Children with their Mothers

Ruling year info

2004

Executive Director

Ms. Vanessa Perez

Main address

PO Box 25040

San Bernardino, CA 92406 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

52-2405277

NTEE code info

Housing Rehabilitation (L25)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (A01)

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Lack of affordable housing, reentry opportunities and safe places for women to reunify with their children is a major problem in the United States. Our goal is to create permanent housing, entrepreneurship and thriving communities. We have decided that homeless women and children are not to be thrown away but if given some support like a hand up, not a hand out, they too, could become responsible members of our communities. We have proved it works. Additionally, women need access to services that elevate their financial and economic health. TFCF's programs and services will provided the needed housing and services that support overall health and wellness of our families, increased employment opportunities, financial literacy and general wealth building strategies, and life skills that aim to help women maintain self-sufficiency.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Housing and Supportive Services

Time for Change Foundation offers a full continuum of housing from emergency shelter, permanent – supportive housing, and affordable housing for families and individuals. In 2018, they opened their first expansion project, Brighter Futures, in the Bay Area.

Programs and Services:
1. Housing - Emergency Shelter
 Southern CA - The Sweet Dreams and Mountain View Women’s Emergency Shelters provide shelter services for homeless women and their children and single adult women respectively. Our shelter program equips them with outcome-driven supportive services, life skills training and tools that assist in the attainment of self-sufficiency.
 Northern CA - Brighter Futures opened in December 2018 in the City of Hayward. Our expansion to the Bay Area is focused on helping women reunify with their children and providing stability and structure that supports self-sufficiency. Brighter Futures demonstrates that our model can be replicated across the country to address the rising numbers of women's homelessness.

Housing - Permanent-Supportive Housing
 The Homes of Hope program, utilizes 13 scattered sites throughout the city, for the purpose of housing chronically homeless disabled families. Clients are placed into permanent housing and provided with wrap-around services and strength-based case management in order to achieve self-sufficiency.

Housing - Affordable (Permanent) Housing
 The Phoenix Square, our first affordable housing project as the developer. It is crime-free, multi-housing, and was awarded the Crime Prevention through Environmental Design. It currently represents low-income housing that is affordable.

2. Supportive Services:
a. Strength-Based Case Management-Evidence-based case management ensures that staff can best meet the needs of the clients by earning trust, building relationships, and acknowledging that the client has strengths that can be developed.
b. Drug and Alcohol Counseling -TFCF is a licensed Drug and Alcohol Provider for outpatient services for clients who are battling drug and alcohol addictions.
c. Transportation Services -Clients will be provided with transit services by either utilizing our agency’s van or utilizing bus passes for public transportation to ensure engagement in critical services.
d. Life Skills Education -Strength-based training in that will improve coping skills with issues of distress; build self-esteem and self-sufficiency.
e. Independent Living Skills - A day-to-day program that teaches our clients critical thinking skills and how to do daily tasks such as cooking, cleaning, shopping, and connect socially. This program teaches responsibility, accountability, and self-reliance.
f. Legal - Women Accessing Legal services is critical as we challenge the systems that perpetuate disparities and unjust treatment of women of color. Through our partnership with Root & Rebound, we provide a full-time attorney in-house for our clients to fully access the legal services they need to reunify with their children and clear their records.
g. Family Reunification -After careful assessment of the best interests of the child, here women reunify with their children and work closely with licensed professionals to ensure that their children's needs are being met.
h. Parenting Education -Classes and therapeutic sessions that facilitates and strengthens mother-child bonding. Taught by a certified parenting educator clients learn how to understand their children as well as their behavior, teach their children discipline and cooperation, and how to listen and communicate with their children.
i. Childcare Assistance - Which gives clients the flexibility to conduct job searches, build resumes or obtain employment.
j. Mommy and Me - a family bonding program designed to strengthen the family reunification of our moms with their children. Here, parents learn how to effectively communicate, reinforce, and positively affirm their child’s presence, education, and creativity.
k. Financial Education and Money Management -Training that improves financial literacy and money management skills.
l. Leadership Development - Strength-based training, which builds esteem, develop confidence and communicating skills, and spurs interests in civic engagement. Education consists of voting, taxes, school boards, community volunteerism, and understanding both local and state policy.
m. Employment Development Training – Our Work to Win employment program includes resume development, local job market research, home business opportunities, and career counseling. Clients learn to dress for success, proper interviewing communication, follow-ups, and confidence building.
n. Self-esteem - Women’s Wellness encompasses self-esteem enhancement for our women. Authored by Stephanie S. Covington, “A Woman’s Journal” is our self-esteem workbook that addresses issues many women struggle with, especially if they are abusing alcohol and other drugs. This unique class helps women discover their true selves, creating healthy relationships with others, and gaining some spiritual connection.
o. Healthcare Access -Connecting clients with health care providers to ensure that client receive the appropriate treatment and educating clients on how to access providers.
p. Health and Wellness Education -Chronic disease prevention, focuses on changing health behaviors through practicing of proper dieting, exercise, stress management and water consumption.
q. Emergency solutions (W.I.S.H. program) - Emergency services include rental and utility payment assistance to the residents of various cities in San Bernardino County as a means of homeless prevention. Our Wellness Is Stabilized Housing (WISH) Program addresses housing insecurity for families who are at risk of becoming homeless.

Our services meet the needs of our community by addressing each families’ needs, connecting them to critical services and helping them to establish and meet goals that lead them to stable housing and job security, thus eliminating homelessness and poverty and creating healthy, thriving communities. As a full-service human services organization, TFCF responds to the family as a whole. We ensure that all needs are met so that the family unit will be healthy and prepared for life-long success.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Families

Designed to work with current and formerly incarcerated women who have been diagnosed with a substance or mental health condition. Targeted evidence based treatment and mental health services allow women to make the successful transition back into community with an established support system designed to eliminate recidivism. Housing and other supportive services are provided upon release.

Services include: Case Management, counseling, transportation, life skills, parenting, money management, parenting, health and wellness, leadership development, civic engagement, anger management, 12 step meetings, outpatient drug and alcohol classes, Utility Payment Assistance, rental assistance job training.

Population(s) Served
Women and girls
Ethnic and racial groups

Strengthening non profits and government organizations with the tools and efficiencies to properly serve our communities of color. It is essential that we create a safety net of providers who can address the challenges and strengths of individuals seeking supportive services, creating real public safety and ensuring that families are thriving. TFCF is certified in 5 evidence based models.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Accreditations

Ebony Power 100 2017

Gallup Certified Strengths Coach 2019

Awards

Top 10 Hero 2015

CNN

Affiliations & memberships

James Irvine Leadership Award 2018

Dignity Health Woman of the Year Award 2019

Aetna Voices of Health Award 2019

CA 40th Assembly District Women of Distinction Award 2020

Rubicon Value Award 2018

Molina Healthcare Community Champion Award 2018

City of Rialto Jewel Award 2018

United State of Women Leadership Award 2018

Center for Nonprofit Management Inspiration Leader Award 2018

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of homeless participants engaged in housing services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth, Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Housing and Supportive Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of participants that follow counseling recommendations

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Housing and Supportive Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Adult Moms who completed counseling sessions.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of clients who have access to insurance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Children and youth

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of households that obtain/retain permanent housing for at least 6 months

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Of those clients who placed into permanent housing we have a high success rate. Understanding that women with previous evictions, arrest histories are routinely denied access to housing without us.

Number of homeless participants engaged in mental health services

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Clients with mental health diagnosis received mental health care

Number of customers reporting satisfaction with program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our overall client satisfaction rate is high, however, there are instances where clients do not respond well to the structured environment whereby daily activities are required. Daily chores.

Number of parents engaged in fewer acts of abuse and neglect of their children

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Homelessness denies women access to providing for their children which lays the groundwork for abuse and neglect. Given housing and support, children attend school and thrive

Number of personal development plans in place

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All clients receive initial assessment and self-sufficiency plan is created in conjunction with Case Management Support

Number of children in foster care who have stable placements

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls, Infants and toddlers, Families

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Since our inception we have helped 298 children reunite with 130 women. These children were in foster care due to the lack of social safety nets that places these women in unsafe environments.

Number of government officials who publicly support the advocacy effort

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Women and girls

Related Program

Positive Futures II

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Building up leadership from amongst those who are homeless or formerly incarcerated to have a voice and participate in this democracy is essential. Thanks to all of the partners across the state!

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Our organization is aiming to accomplish the following goals:
Create Permanent Housing
Develop Entrepreneurial Opportunities
Create Thriving Families
Eliminate Homelessness
Alleviate Poverty

TFCF Strategies:
Utilize a Housing First Model
Develop Affordable Permanent Housing
Incorporate Evidence-Based Programs for our Clients
Create Entrepreneurial Opportunities for our Clients
Create Thriving Families
Eliminate Homelessness
Alleviate Poverty
Build capacity for other non-profit through our Center for Advocacy and Leadership Training (C.A.L.T.)
Utilizing Employment Development and Education Services to increase employability and literacy of our clients

Our capabilities include:
Dedicated and qualified Staff
Strong Organizational and Fiscal Leadership
Quality and Appropriate programs and Services
Strategic Locations
Formidable Collaboration

How will your organization know if you are making progress?
We use proper assessments which include tracking, data collection and analysis. Our program success rates are measured at three intervals:
Intake
3 months
6months

This allows us to see the long term success of each participant and how well they are able to maintain their self-sufficient status.

What have and haven't you accomplished so far?
Eliminating homelessness for the 60,000 homeless children in San Bernardino County

Since our inception, we have assisted over 1700 homeless women make the transition into self-sufficiency. In addition, we have reunited 303 children from foster care back with their moms in our various housing programs. Our accomplishments began with creating one 6-bed shelter to today now operating 3 emergency shelters, 10 Permanent Supportive Housing Units, and the development of our own affordable housing apartment, The Phoenix Square.

In 2020, we received a donation of a restaurant and 10,000 square foot building to re-purpose to enhance our employment development and entrepreneurship program for women.

In 2019, we were featured on the Steve Harvey Show. Additionally we began our Rights, Equality, and Law (REAL) Project to provide legal services to the families we serve.

In 2018, TFCF successfully expanded its housing model to the Bay Area and launched the Brighter Futures Home for women and children. Additionally, we received our second award from SAMHSA for our Positive Futures project to assist women successfully transition from incarceration back into society.

In 2018, TFCF was selected as one of the James Irvine Foundation's Leaders of California for creating innovating program models that could be duplicated across California.

In 2017, Kim Carter was honored as one of Ebony's Power 100 most influential African Americans in the United States as a result of the work at Time for Change Foundation.

In October of 2015, our Executive Director Kim Carter was selected as one of CNN's Top 10 Heroes in the world. The work she is doing to help others has transcended the United States and is now being shown in 80 different countries world wide.

In 2013, we began our partnership with Technical Employment Training center for our Work to Win 10-week hands-on job training program which provides the education and skills to enter the high-tech jobs market. Students learn how to create and produce products used for the aerospace industry. This national accreditation will provide greater access to high paying jobs for our clients.

In 2012, TFCF experienced a growth spurt with the award of two federal grants. We were awarded our Homes of Hope project from the U.S. Department of HUD which places homeless families directly into their own apartment. This expanded our permanent housing capacity with 10 additional apartments. We were also awarded our Positive Futures project from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services SAMHSA to assist women successfully transition from incarceration back into society.

Additionally, we developed our first affordable housing apartment complex, the Phoenix Square. Our permanent housing option for clients successfully completing our shelter program. Awarded the “Crime Prevention through Environmental Design" and the “Crime-Free Multi Housing" certification, the Phoenix Square sets the standard for low-incoming housing in California.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Women and girls Ethnic and racial groups Low-income people Offenders Ex-offenders Substance abusers

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, User Led designs of our programs,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    As a result of feedback from our clients, we created a Client Council, to support the new women transitioning into the program. The current clients in our housing program wanted some decision making power in selecting the new clients transitioning in. As a result, the older clients took on the "big sister " role and felt responsible for the new woman's success.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Collecting feedback from the people we serve has shown us how to respond to their needs in a manner that will work best for them. It has improved efficiency and quickness in responding to their feedback to enhance better results, we have better accuracy in data – as it comes directly from participant, and anonymity has allowed our clients to provide honest feedback which contributes to the improvement of programs and services.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, People want us to start programs for men with children or other things that are not in our scope of,

Financials

TIME FOR CHANGE FOUNDATION
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

TIME FOR CHANGE FOUNDATION

Board of directors
as of 8/31/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr. Nicole Henley

Time for Change Foundation.

Term: 2017 - 2020

Kim Carter

Founder and Ambassador

Dr. Nicole Henley

Professor

Beverly Earl

Social Worker

Dr. Laura Manyweather

Businesswoman

Veronica Robledo

Bank Manager

Anindita Ganguly

Psychologist

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/23/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Hispanic/Latino/Latina/Latinx
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

We do not display disability information for organizations with fewer than 15 staff.

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/05/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.