PLATINUM2023

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF THE UNITED STATES

Empowering Voters. Defending Democracy.

aka League of Women Voters; LWV   |   WASHINGTON, DC   |  www.lwv.org

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Mission

The League of Women Voters, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages the informed and active participation of citizens in government and influences public policy through education and advocacy.

Ruling year info

1950

CEO

Virginia Kase Solomón

Main address

1233 20th Street, NW Suite 500

WASHINGTON, DC 20036 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-0115655

NTEE code info

Voter Education/Registration (R40)

Public, Society Benefit - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (W99)

Leadership Development (W70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

We believe in the power of women to create a more perfect democracy. That's been our vision since 1920, when the League of Women Voters was founded by leaders of the women’s suffrage movement. For 100 years, we have been a nonpartisan, activist, grassroots organization that believes voters should play a critical role in democracy. The League was officially founded in Chicago in 1920, just six months before the 19th amendment was ratified and women won the vote. Formed by the suffragists of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, the League began as a "mighty political experiment" designed to help 20 million women carry out their new responsibilities as voters. February 14th, 2023, marks 103 years that the League of Women Voters has empowered voters and defended democracy. Over the last century, we’ve fought for election protection, democratic reforms, and equal access to the ballot—all while maintaining our commitment to nonpartisanship and fostering an informed electorate.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Voter Protection

1) Member/association services
2) Advocacy and public policy: Political responsibility through informed and active participation of citizens in government and to action on selected issues.
3) Communications: preparation and dissemination of information which promote political awareness, responsibility and promote address selected issues.

Population(s) Served
Adults

We fight to increase voters’ access to the polls, including expanding early voting, automatic and online voter registration.

Population(s) Served
Age groups
Ethnic and racial groups
Social and economic status

The League is at the forefront of the most important federal and state cases across the United States. Our organizing and legal team works tirelessly to oppose all forms of voter suppression, including:

Discriminatory voter ID laws;

Attacks on voter registration;

Last-minute Election Day barriers;

The elimination of voting locations in underserved communities;

Unjust voter purges; and

Attempts to limit access to early and mail-in voting.

Population(s) Served

A lack of information on the candidates, issues and election processes is a key obstacle keeping many underrepresented groups of voters from the polls. Fortunately, there is no better national source of election-related information than the League’s VOTE411.org website. Our free, digital election resource provides state-by-state voter guides, registration information, candidate positions on issues, and more in both English and Spanish. In 2022, millions of people used VOTE411 to find information on over 52,000 different races.

Population(s) Served

The League's advocacy continues to focus on the core issues of election administration, voter protection, and money in politics, and has added global climate change, immigration policy, gun safety, health care reform and fiscal policy to the priority issue agenda. The League's advocacy staff works tirelessly to inform and educate the public on these issues and, when warranted, to defend the public interest in court. The League advocates on behalf of issues, and propose and promote legislation to support a better, fairer democracy.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of candidates profiled on Vote411.org

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Vote 411

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We receive candidate profiles from individuals running for office, and make sure that the public has an understanding of who is running for these positions. The information is never "scraped."

Number of voters protected by legal action.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups

Related Program

Voting Rights Litigation

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of voters in states protected by our legal advocacy, settlements and judgments from federal Courts.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The League of Women Voters is a nonpartisan, grassroots organization working to protect and expand voting rights and ensure everyone is represented in our democracy. We empower voters and defend democracy through advocacy, education, and litigation, at the local, state, and national levels.

We believe in the power of women to create a more perfect democracy. That's been our vision since 1920, when the League of Women Voters was founded by leaders of the women’s suffrage movement. For 100 years, we have been a nonpartisan, activist, grassroots organization that believes voters should play a critical role in democracy.

Protect Voting Rights: For more than 100 years, the League has fought to protect the rights of voters and expand access for those who’ve been left out of our democratic process. We do so through a combination of advocacy, litigation, education, partnerships, and grassroots efforts.

Elections: The League works not only to empower voters with the information they need to take part in elections, but to create more fair, accessible election systems.

Vote411.org: VOTE411 has served tens of millions of voters and won multiple national awards over the last fifteen years. We have long been a trusted source of objective and factual election information – your “one stop-shop” for everything election-related. We provide meticulously researched bilingual (English and Spanish) election information in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and provide updated information throughout the year as information changes.

Fight Voter Suppression: The League is at the forefront of the most important federal and state cases across the United States. Our legal team works tirelessly to oppose all forms of voter suppression, including: discriminatory voter ID laws; attacks on voter registration; last-minute Election Day barriers; the elimination of voting locations in under-served communities; unjust voter purges; and attempts to limit access to early and mail-in voting.

Advocacy and Public Interest Lobbying: We work with legislators, grassroots organizers, and people like you to promote laws and policies that make the promise of democracy real for all Americans.

Our members are passionate activists who support our work in all 50 states and in more than 750 communities around the country. We rely on paid staff, volunteer leaders, and promote a strong civic infrastructure in areas rural, suburban and urban across the country.

Our volunteers work year-round to register new voters, host community forums and debates, and provide voters with election information they need. We engage at the local and state levels on legislative priorities and efforts to improve our elections and protect our democracy. We are citizen lobbyists, poll-workers, and educators on civic life. With a 103-year old history and a framework around democracy, voting rights, and gender equality, the LWV-EF works to ensure that we all have a say in our country's future. Out longevity as an organization ensures people know we are here to stay, we are focused on issues and not on partisanship.

No League, whether state or local, operates alone. And no League would be as powerful or as effective without the federated model. We connect local and state Leagues to other voting rights leaders and policymakers at the
national level. We have access to the best experts, diverse leaders, and thought leaders who work with us to solve the increasing problems of our democracy.

Local LWV Impact: We need grassroots power and relationships to do our work well — plus the listening
capabilities of local Leagues in almost every corner of our country. Those relationships are key to understanding how to support voting rights, work with election officials, champion transparency, and challenge money in politics.

State LWV Impact: Local Leagues are powerful, and part of their power is their cumulative work with the
state Leagues that understand the statewide dynamics. State Leagues have independent and often long-standing relationships with statehouse media, government actors, and secretaries of state — and understand
the context, opportunities, and threats across each state. Educational campaigns are more effective when we have these allies working with us.

National LWV Impact: Many of the challenging trends we see first on the local and state level eventually spread
nationwide. The expertise and coordination that our national office provides on issues allow local Leagues to shine while connecting them to broader experience, leadership, and proven strategies — particularly with regard to the complex dynamics of legal precedent in federal courts. LWVUS uses smart advocacy and lobbying capacity to ensure that there is a voice in congress for voting rights, and strong support for state Leagues in ways that make their advocacy more impactful.

Using our federated model, we can respond to the scope, urgency, and complexity of the
most challenging issues facing our democracy.

LWVEF contacted nearly 1.2 million voters via canvas,
email, mail, phone, and text during this timeframe to
provide them with critical election information, including
how to make a voting plan, find their polling place, learn
about early and absentee voting options, and encourage
them to exercise their right to vote. Additionally, LWVEF
reached 10.28 million people through VOTE411-specific
social media posts. LWVEF ran three VOTE411 marketing
campaigns during FY22 to inform voters ahead of the fall
2021 general election, Texas 2022 primary election, and
spring 2022 primary elections in select states. These three
advertising campaigns reached over 1 million voters.

To advance the League’s legislative priorities from July
2021 through June 2022, LWVUS initiated 13 action alerts
covering issues including reproductive choice, the Equal
Rights Amendment, and the DISCLOSE Act. All centered
around a major tenet of the League’s work: that equality, be
it bodily, political, or financial, is a right and a necessity in a
healthy democracy.
Collectively, these alerts yielded 57,447 actions from
individuals resulting in 92,329 letters to members of
Congress. The League also engaged more than 32,000
new activists in making their voices heard and demanding
elected officials hear the priorities of the voters.

When it comes to the League's support of Fair Maps,
LWVUS worked with 55 redistricting
champions nationwide to build education and engagement
events and held a three-day intensive virtual training for
Leagues to gear up for the release of Census data and
public input, all while safely navigating COVID-19. The
League reached every goal for the second year of the
program, including engaging 5,763 redistricting volunteers,
attending 1,485 stakeholder meetings, holding 1,077
redistricting events for the public, engaging 738 partners to
support redistricting education and engagement planning,
working on and supporting 19 legislative initiatives that
were introduced, and filing redistricting-relevant lawsuits
addressing deadlines and transparency.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback, We ask the people who gave us feedback how well they think we responded

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to get honest feedback from the people we serve

Financials

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF THE UNITED STATES
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF THE UNITED STATES

Board of directors
as of 10/20/2023
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Dr Deborah Turner

League of Women Voters of the United States

Term: 2022 - 2024

Leah Edwards

Toni Zimmer

Deborah Turner

Melissa Currence

Jessica Lowe-Minor

Melissa Breach

Joan Hunault

Sania Irwin

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/10/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data