Goodwill Industries International, Inc. HQ

Bring Good Home.

aka Goodwill Industries   |   Rockville, MD   |  www.goodwill.org

Mission

Goodwill Industries International works to enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity, and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work. Find your local Goodwill at http://www.goodwill.org/locator/

Ruling year info

1952

President and CEO

Steve C. Preston

Main address

15810 Indianola Dr

Rockville, MD 20855 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-0196517

NTEE code info

Human Service Organizations (P20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Local Goodwill organizations sell material donations to fuel a social enterprise and retail footprint that provides important job placement opportunities and job training to help people find jobs, earn paychecks and build their skills. Each local Goodwill organization helps people create better futures for themselves and those who desire self-sufficiency. Goodwill's network of organizations provides support services for millions of people annually, and delivers positive social and environmental outcomes for the global community by diverting waste from landfills and supporting a sustainable change in people's lives.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Goodwill Programs

Community-based employment and training programs are central to the Goodwill mission. Most Goodwill member organizations provide services that fall into four general categories: vocational evaluation, vocational adjustment, job search and placement services and transitional employment. Goodwill organizations prepare people who are unemployed or underemployed for careers in high-demand fields such as, information technology, health care, retail, hospitality, manufacturing, construction, and automative. Many Goodwill organizations also offer life skills training, financial education programs and other support services, such as childcare, transportation and mentoring. In 2016, more than 2 million people collectively engaged in face-to-face Goodwill services to build their career and financial assets, and advance in their careers. In addition, more than 34 million people used computers and mobile devices to access education, training, mentoring, online learning services, virtual career fairs and employment opportunities offered by Goodwill organizations to strengthen their skills.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Families

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2014

Awards

CSR Professional – Kim Zimmer for Donate Movement Campaign 2011

PR News People Awards: PR News

Summit Marketing Effectiveness Award- Silver (for donate.goodwill.org website) 2011

Summit International Awards (submitted by Matrix Group)

Award of Excellence – External Communications and Communities for GoodProspects website 2012

Excellence in New Communications Award - Society for New Communications Research (SNCR)

Telly Award for Graduate and Achiever Videos 2012

Telly Awards

Silver Inkwell Award of Excellence for SCSEP Marketing 2011

International Association of Business Communicators (IABC)

Affiliations & memberships

Alliance for Children and Families - Member 2012

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance - Organization 2012

NISH-Creating Employment Opportunities for People with Severe Disabilities 2012

National Council on Aging 2012

National Council of La Raza (NCLR) - Affiliate 2012

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of clients served

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, People with disabilities, Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people

Related Program

Goodwill Programs

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This total represents the combined activity of the 156 North American Goodwill organizations. The metrics include significant growth in virtual services though online training tools.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Ethnic and racial groups, Unemployed people, People with disabilities, Adults, Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

Goodwill Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This total represents the combined activity of the 156 North American Goodwill organizations.

Total Annualized Estimated Wages Earned by Individuals Connected to Jobs in Their Communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, Unemployed people, People with disabilities

Related Program

Goodwill Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This estimated total represents the combined activity of the 156 North American Goodwill organizations.

Total Annualized Estimated Taxes Paid by Individuals Connected to Jobs in Their Communities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Ethnic and racial groups, Economically disadvantaged people, People with disabilities, Unemployed people

Related Program

Goodwill Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This total represents the combined activity of the 156 North American Goodwill organizations.

Total Annualized Estimated Taxes Paid by Individuals Employed by Goodwill

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Goodwill Programs

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This total represents the combined activity of the 156 North American Goodwill organizations.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Founded in 1902 by Rev. Edgar Helms, Goodwill® has a mission to, “Enhance the dignity and quality of life of individuals and families by strengthening communities, eliminating barriers to opportunity and helping people in need reach their full potential through learning and the power of work." Goodwill Industries International, Incorporated (GII), supports the network of 160 local autonomous Goodwill organizations and manages the Goodwill brand in support of this mission. GII also secures and distributes resources to support services delivered by local Goodwill organizations. GII works closely with the membership to support efforts to grow Goodwill's mission, strengthen the business and advance the brand. Resources and tools offered to the membership and developed in collaboration with the membership include consultations in the areas of donated goods retail operations, strategic planning and accreditation.
GII provides data analytics that demonstrate the health of the network as well as competitive analysis and market research for donated goods retail growth.
In addition, GII offers services in the areas of:
• Advocacy
• External communications including marketing, PR and digital/social media
• Financial strategies and support
• Platforms and conferences for knowledge sharing and best practices
• Leadership and development opportunities
• Mission advancement support services
• Membership and grant compliance

Local Goodwill organizations help equip people to achieve economic independence, build strong families and invigorate their communities by providing direct pathways to employment both inside and outside local Goodwill organizations. Goodwill also connects individuals to credentialing opportunities to advance their careers and provides financial wellness services to equip individuals to achieve economic self-sufficiency. Goodwill serves people who have a disability, lack education or job experience, or face other employment challenges.

In 2015, GII's Board of Directors approved a five-year strategic plan which common-ground aspirations of autonomous local Goodwill organizations to advance mission by building business and strengthening the brand thereby enhancing outcomes and impact experienced by persons and communities served.

Across the network of autonomous local organizations, Goodwill provides career navigation and financial wellness services to help individuals and families achieve economic mobility. Individuals participate in an intake and assessment process that results in an individualized career and financial plan (ICFP) for the entire family's economic success. Goodwill then either provides or coordinates with partners to deliver an array of programs and services to help individuals achieve their specific goals, including but not limited to:

• Career readiness services such as résumé refinement, job search assistance, soft skills workshops and access to technology.
• Online and on-the-ground skills education and training services via GCFLearnFree.org, GCFAprendelibre.org, Excel Centers, community colleges, College for America and other partners to equip individuals with career navigation and financial wellness competencies.
• Financial wellness services including free tax preparation, financial coaching, budgeting classes and access to work supports.
• Occupational skills training programs that are relevant to the labor market needs in local communities in partnership with businesses and industry organizations.
• Job placement services through on-the-job training programs, transitional employment and direct referrals through employer partnerships.
• Credentialing opportunities to build market-valued skills through partnerships with community colleges and other credentialing organizations.
• Holistic wrap-around support services including transportation, child care, mental health services, and other work supports.
• On-the-job support and retention services to foster career success and advancement.

Goodwill wais the #1 brand for two years in a row accordng to how the brand resonates with people's values per the World Value Index as commissioned by enso, an agency creating world value through mission-driven creativity (2017, 2016). Goodwill was rated in Forbes' 20 most inspiring companies, the only nonprofit to be featured on that list. Goodwill is #2 in The NonProfit Times' 2017 Top 100 – the 29th annual study of the nation's largest nonprofits. Goodwill is #14 on Forbes' listing of America's Top 100 Charities (2017). The list evaluates nonprofits on various financial efficiency metrics.
Goodwill's structure as a network of local autonomous, community-based organizations enables local leaders to innovate and share their effective practices and successes with the entire network. Local Goodwill organizations leverage community needs assessments and asset mapping, local employer relationships and community partners to deliver career navigation and financial wellness programs that address the needs of both program participants and employers in their communities. By coupling local innovations with external research and partnerships, GII disseminates information about effective service models through online engagement platforms, toolkits, conferences, and virtual and onsite consultations. Process improvements and integrated support systems implemented at the local level empower adult learners to navigate career and financial wellness resources that help them complete their credentials.

Through the social enterprise model, local Goodwill organizations can ensure the sustainability of its work to equip people to advance their careers and achieve economic mobility. In 2017, Goodwill raised $4.29 billion of its $5.87 billion in revenue from the collection and sale of donated goods in more than 3,300 retail stores and on the auction site www.shopgoodwill.org®; 87.5 percent of funds were reinvested in services to support people seeking employment, skills and financial wellness. Goodwill leverages existing partnerships and resources as it explores new options to enhance mission impact.

In 2017, every second of every business day, another person accessed Goodwill opportunities to strengthen careers and families. More than 2 million people engaged in-person with Goodwill team members to build career and financial assets. Thirty-six million people used Goodwill mobile and online learning to improve their skills or access virtual coaching and counseling services to make their lives better.

Goodwill helped 238,000 individuals secure employment in 2018; these individuals earned an estimated $4.8 billion in wages. This is a testament to local Goodwill organizations strengthening relationships with local employers as guided by advanced labor market data. These two strategies help local Goodwills aim well as they design job training programs to meet the labor market needs in local communities.

Recognizing skills development is critical in the 21st century economy, Goodwill emphasizes postsecondary education and training. Because a job is often not enough, more than 24,000 people engaged with Goodwill to earn market-valued credentials. In 2017, Goodwill participants and employees earned credentials that would potentially allow them to earn an additional $12.3 billion over their careers. The 24,000 employees and participants who enhanced their skills through earning credentials or certifications added $12.3 billion dollars to their potential lifetime earnings (based on analysis by the Center on Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University).
At the end of 2017, Goodwill employed 129,000 individuals, primarily through its donated goods retail social enterprise. During 2017, autonomous local Goodwill organizations collectively compensated their employees $2.9 billion in payroll and benefits.
Because Goodwill is committed to doing more with greater impact, the Data Analytics Initiative (DAI) was launched in an effort to develop a platform that allow local Goodwill members and GII to harness powerful and useful data in a consistent way allowing for stronger business decisions. The initiative includes mission measures in order to improve understanding of the impact of Goodwill services on the lives of individuals, families and households. Through this initiative, Goodwill seeks to improve the quality of life and economic security of low-income individuals and their families.

Financials

Goodwill Industries International, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Goodwill Industries International, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 07/12/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Amy Luttrell

Goodwill Industries of Kentucky, Inc.

Term: 2019 - 2021

Tony Bell

County of Spartanburg, SC

Clark Brekke

Goodwill Industries of the Inland Northwest

Debie Coble

Goodwill Industries of Michiana

Ed Durkee

Goodwill Central Coast

Karla Grazier

Discover Goodwill of Southern and Western Colorado

Edgar "Ned" Helms

Retired

Dale Jenkins

Deloitte LLP

Shae Johns

Southern Oregon Goodwill Industries

Ron Johnson

Georgia Tech

Steve Lufburrow

Goodwill Industries of Houston

Amy Luttrell

Goodwill Industries of Kentucky, Inc.

Joan McCabe

Lipotriad LLC

Rob Morton

Morton Resources Inc.

Anne Myong

Akhil Nigam

Fidelity Labs, Mass Challenge

Etienne Patout

Theo Chocolate

Steve Roden

Conduent

Bob Rosinsky

Goodwill Manasota

Lisa Rusyniak

Goodwill Industries of the Chesapeake, Inc.

Mike Sekits

Strandview Capital

Fred Shelfer, Jr.

Goodwill Industries-Big Bend, Inc.

Laura Smith

Goodwill Industries of Hawaii, Inc.

Deb Testa

Lockton Companies

Vickie Volpano

Goodwill of Western and Northern Connecticut

Matthew Wadiak

Cooks Venture

Brenda Gumbs

Centennial, Inc

Joe Guith

McAlister's Deli

Michael Winckler

Goodwill Southeast Georgia

Ed Oxford

Retired

Bruce Phipps

Goodwill Industries of the Valleys

Jackie Hallberg

Goodwill Industries of Southeastern Wisconsin

Richmond Vincent, CE

Goodwill Industries of South Mississippi

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/7/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data