National Wildlife Federation HQ

Uniting all Americans to ensure wildlife thrive in a rapidly changing world

aka NWF   |   Reston, VA   |  http://www.nwf.org

Mission

The National Wildlife Federation's mission is uniting all Americans to ensure wildlife thrive in a rapidly changing world. We believe America’s experience with cherished landscapes and wildlife has helped define and shape our national character and identity for generations. Protecting these natural resources is a cause that has long united Americans from all walks of life and political stripes. To hunters, anglers, hikers, birders, wildlife watchers, boaters, climbers, campers, cyclists, gardeners, farmers, forest stewards, and other outdoor enthusiasts, this conservation ethic represents a sacred duty and obligation to protect and build upon our conservation heritage for the sake of wildlife, ourselves, our neighbors, and—most of all—for future generations.

Notes from the nonprofit

To have the greatest impact, we need Americans' diverse, far-reaching support. By getting involved with the National Wildlife Federation, you're amplifying our voice for wildlife and influencing positive change. Donate, volunteer, and take action at: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Get-Involved

Be a part of our conservation army working to build a better future for wildlife.

Ruling year info

1943

President and CEO

Mr. Collin O'Mara

Main address

11100 Wildlife Center Drive

Reston, VA 20190 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-0204616

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

America is rich with diverse wildlife and abundant natural resources. Over the past century, working in partnership, we have recovered hundreds of species and begun restoring vital natural resources. Despite these successes, there is an overall, systemic decline in fish and wildlife populations in the United States and across the globe, mostly due to habitat loss and degradation. Climate change has accelerated and intensified this decline. In fact, more than one-third of America's fish and wildlife species are at risk of extinction in the coming decades.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Protecting Habitats

To thrive, wildlife need unspoiled spaces where they can access food, water, cover, and places to raise young. But due to increasing changes to our country’s landscape, habitats are being altered, polluted, and fragmented. The NWF's current work with refuges, parks, wild areas, private lands, forests, wetlands, grasslands, waters, and coasts is vital to supporting fish and wildlife populations. We are also focused on strategies for protected areas, working lands, and communities to expand, enhance, and connect crucial habitats on these landscapes.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Our-Work/Habitats

Population(s) Served
Adults

Over the past four decades, the NWF's work with water quality policies such as the Clean Water Act has led to much progress in cleaning up rivers and streams. Unfortunately, today we’re seeing pollution and climate change have devastating effects on our waters. The NWF remains steadfast in improving water quality and aquatic ecosystems, from small streams to vast iconic areas like the Great Lakes.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Our-Work/Waters

Population(s) Served
Adults

Early in its history, the NWF's first priority was securing the passage of an act that supported the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation, pairing dedicated resources and sound scientific wildlife management. This initial victory—the 1937 Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act (also called the Pittman-Robertson Act)—led to the recovery of dozens of birds and mammals and propelled our work with countless conservation partners in the following decades to secure funding for sportfish, protect habitat and endangered species, and improve the quality of our water, soil, and air.

This model for conservation has had enormous successes, but many other species are suffering declines. Today the NWF and its affiliates are taking a series of critical and timely steps to not only reverse the decline of American wildlife populations, but to significantly increase their numbers over the next 30 years.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Our-Work/Wildlife-Conservation

Population(s) Served
Adults

As our nation's population continues to grow, our environment faces increasing strain. The NWF is fighting for more assertive policies to address modern threats and restore healthy wildlife populations, from curbing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing carbon sequestration, to protecting at-risk populations from toxic chemicals, contaminants, and non-native invaders. We’re also seeking innovative ways to solve current problems and prevent new threats from emerging.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Our-Work/Environmental-Threats

Population(s) Served
Adults

From towering forests to lush green grasslands, our nation's diverse and wondrous lands provide us with invaluable resources. Built on the foundation that our lands are part of the public trust, the NWF supports our nation’s shared interests for wildlife with the management of both public and private lands. Working closely with our partners, we are developing new strategies to manage the lands on which we live, work, and engage with nature to support healthy wildlife populations.

Nearly two-thirds of American land is used for production activities such as farming, grazing, and active forestry. We want to ensure that these activities, while vital to our economy and way of life, are better balanced with the needs of wildlife and their habitats. We are the voice that will ensure wildlife remains in the public trust.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Our-Work/Our-Lands

Population(s) Served
Adults

The NWF is growing our “big tent” of individuals and institutions taking action in support of our work for wildlife. This includes continued work with people across the political spectrum, states, cities, counties, towns, and media partners, as well as a huge collaborative cohort of agencies and organizations that have the ability to directly improve conditions for fish and wildlife.

Working in close partnership with our state and territorial affiliates, we will engage many more by 2021. This includes broader-based national conservation and environmental organizations, federal and state agencies, nature centers, museums and zoos, schools, garden clubs, civic groups, and more.

The NWF's Great American Campout connects people with the great outdoors by promoting a great American tradition: outdoor camping. In 2017, more than 200,000 Americans pledged to participate. Through this program, and through partnerships like Hispanics Enjoying Camping, Hunting, and the Outdoors (HECHO), we’re introducing and reconnecting people to our rich outdoor heritage and better acquainting participants with wildlife. The NWF is deepening its partnerships with traditional supporters—such as hunters and anglers, gardeners, and tribes—and developing increased partnerships with diverse groups from across the country. One way in which the NWF is boldly leading this effort is our Women in Conservation Leadership Summit. Open to women in the conservation field, the summit arms women with tools to be more dynamic voices in their field.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Our-Work/People

Population(s) Served
Adults

The NWF unites all Americans in our shared interests for wildlife conservation. We are on the ground across the country working with communities that span geographical, ethnic, and social ties to learn about grassroots issues and take collective action.

Many of the nation's greatest environmental challenges and opportunities are found in our urban centers. The Midwest Urban Initiative, based out of the NWF's Great Lakes Regional Center, helps urban communities strengthen their capacity to address environmental concerns. Our work includes on-the-ground advocacy for policy action that benefits urban communities, like clean water access in Flint, Michigan.

We’re also reaching communities with our grassroots programs. Across the country we empower individuals and community leaders to take action for wildlife through the NWF's Garden for Wildlife and Community Wildlife Habitats™ programs.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Garden-for-Wildlife

Population(s) Served
Adults

The NWF has worked to connect children and youth with nature for decades, inspiring children through Ranger Rick® magazine, working with educators to get kids learning outdoors, and helping parents find new ways to engage their children outside.

Our three-year goal is to get 21 million American children, teens, and young adults out of their indoor habitat and into the great outdoors. Programs include Schoolyard Habitats, Eco-Schools USA, Earth Tomorrow, Trees for Wildlife, and Garden for Wildlife.

For more information: https://www.nwf.org/Home/Kids-and-Family/Connecting-Kids-and-Nature

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Adolescents

The Federation’s environmental justice program builds upon over a decade of urban initiatives, relationship building, and community engagement under the leadership of Simone Lightfoot, Associate Vice President of Environmental Justice and Climate Justice. Our work is rooted in race and social justice by design. It is underpinned by a philosophy of listening before talking, giving before asking, sharing resources, and building community and campus capacity to engage and take action. Our environmental justice work intentionally prioritizes, amplifies, and includes the policy solutions, views, and voices of Black, Latinx, Indigenous, Asian and Pacific Islanders, and lower wealth communities that have been impacted the most by discriminatory practices. We invest the time and cultural respect required to build authentic relationships and connect our policy and advocacy efforts to those communities challenged most immediately and seriously by climate change.

Population(s) Served
Ethnic and racial groups
Adults
Children and youth

Where we work

Accreditations

Charity Navigator 2021

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2021

Global Giving--Leader Status 2021

Better Business Bureau 2020

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Defend America’s democratic public trust resources (public lands, waterways, and wildlife) for current and future generations from threats of divestiture, reduced access, or privatization.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Managing Public and Private Lands

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We helped to pass the historic, bipartisan Great American Outdoors Act, which will provide $900M per year for the Land and water Conservation Fund.

Ensure a majority of Americans and policymakers are aware of our nation’s wildlife crisis by activating 11 million people and joining forces with 2,500 partner organizations.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Protecting Habitats

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 we continued to activate our 6 million members, supporters, and activists to help protect wildlife across the country.

Rebuild America’s conservation ethic by engaging 25 million young people across 20,000 schools in environmental education and recurring outdoor experiences.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Connecting Kids with Nature

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 the National Wildlife Federation’s Garden for Wildlife program certified its 250,000th Certified Wildlife Habitat, and we continued to engage 15 million youth in nature & outdoor programming.

Increase the relevance of wildlife conservation nationwide by partnering on local water, wildlife habitat, and environmental justice projects in 1,000 diverse urban and rural communities.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Reaching Communities

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In 2020 the National Wildlife Federation held a series of environmental justice roundtable conversations with 119 frontline community leaders and elected officials.

Put 25% of America’s at-risk wildlife species on a path to recovery, protect and better manage habitat and wildlife on 300 million acres of public and tribal land, and restore and enhance the resilience of 40 million acres of critical private land and water habitat.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Protecting Habitats

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Our Great Lakes office's leadership of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative has helped to restore more than 167,000 acres of coastal, upland, island, and wetland habitat.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Widespread declines in many wildlife populations show us we cannot rely on what's worked to date. We need to do more to address both longstanding and new pressures on wildlife - and we need to start right away. Our new Common Agenda for Wildlife, put forth by the National Wildlife Federation and its 51 state and territorial affiliated organizations, will engage the entire US conservation movement in taking a series of critical and timely steps to not only reverse the decline of American wildlife populations but to significantly increase their numbers over the next 30 years.

Our four-year strategic plan (FY 2018-2021) represents the best thinking from across the National Wildlife Federation, our affiliates, and our conservation partners on what collective actions are needed to make a sizable impact towards increasing wildlife populations within a generation. The plan sets in motion a Common Agenda for Wildlife built upon sound science, clear priorities, and scalable solutions that match the magnitude of the crisis. Our Common Agenda includes a commitment to:
• Protect, Restore, and Connect Wildlife Habitat—Promote active restoration and reconnection of fragmented and degraded habitat across protected lands, working lands, waterways, coasts, and communities.
• Transform Wildlife Conservation—Advance 21st-century wildlife management, defend public trust resources, and confront emerging stressors like climate change, invasive species, and wildlife diseases.
• Connect Americans with Wildlife—Inspire the next generation of conservationists and mobilize a diverse conservation army to broaden the stewardship ethic, conservation action, public and private investments, and support for policy changes necessary to save thousands of at-risk species in our time.

The National Wildlife Federation and our conservation partners have proven time and again that when we bring together diverse forces from across the conservation community and act boldly, we accomplish great things for wildlife. Early in our history, the Federation's first priority was securing passage of the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act (Pittman-Robertson), a foundation of the revered North American model of wildlife conservation. This victory launched the recovery of dozens of bird and mammal species and propelled our later work with countless conservation partners and sportsmen and women to secure funding for sportfish, protect habitat and endangered species, and improve the quality of our water, soil, and air. Today, this means working as One Federation to harness the full power of our unique organizations, broad political perspectives, and geographic diversity. Together, we will attract new investors and launch innovative programs and products that simultaneously advance our vision, expand our reach, and generate new sources of flexible funding to broaden our place-based efforts.

Some Wins for Wildlife in 2020 include:

- The Passage of the Great American Outdoors Act for public lands conservation. The centerpiece of the new law was permanent and full funding of the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which has helped establish parks, waterfront access, hiking trails, wildlife refuges, and much more all across the country. The Land and Water Conservation Fund has been a top priority for the National Wildlife Federation for over five decades.

- A landmark executive order issued by Wyoming Governor Mark Gordon, important mule deer and pronghorn migration routes will be designated and protected from harmful development, which will help conserve these herds for future generations. This is a result of years of work by the Wyoming Wildlife Federation and conservation partners to promote science-based policies to maintain, restore, and reconnect large ungulate wildlife habitat.

- Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s decision to shut down the Line 5 oil pipeline, which threatened to spill millions of gallons of oil into the Great Lakes, was good news for the endangered piping plover. The National Wildlife Federation was the first organization to recognize the threat that Line 5 posed when it issued its landmark 2012 Sunken Hazard report. Since then, the Federation has partnered with numerous allies to bring continuous attention to the wildlife risks the pipeline posed.

- The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission unanimously approved new rules that protect important wildlife habitat from oil and gas development. The regulations, which are likely to become a model for other Western states, protect the mating areas of bighorn sheep and prevent surface disruptions within 500 feet of aquatic high priority habitat. The National Wildlife Federation and the Colorado Wildlife Federation worked together to make sure the commissioners heard about our wildlife habitat concerns.

-California Governor Gavin Newsom’s executive order to conserve and restore 30 percent of the state’s lands and waters by 2030 is designed to combat climate change while recovering hundreds of imperiled wildlife species, including the western monarch butterfly. The National Wildlife Federation has worked closely with Governor Newsom and other leaders in California on this and other initiatives which will restore and connect wildlife habitat to address our biodiversity crisis.

- Leaders from the National Wildlife Federation and its affiliates celebrated the collaboration between Oregon and California state agencies, Tribal communities, and an electric power company in announcing an ambitious plan to remove four massive hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River by 2023.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

National Wildlife Federation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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National Wildlife Federation

Board of directors
as of 9/14/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Kent Salazar

Bruce Wallace

Lawyer, Hooper, Hathaway, Price, Beuche & Wallace

Kent Salazar

Environmental Consultant

Ambassador Alan Blinken

Chairman, Board of Washington Center

Carol Buie-Jackson

Owner and Educator, Bird House on the Greenway

Dianne Dillon-Ridgley

Environmentalist and Human Rights Activist

Scott Gilmore

Deputy Executive Director, Parks and Recreation, City and County of Denver, Colorado

Bill Houston

Registered Maine Guide, Outdoor Leadership and Skills Instructor, Somerset Career and Technical Center

Brianna Jones

Executive Director, Equality State Policy Center

Koalani Kaulukukui-Barbee

Owner, Kaulukukui Solutions, LLC

Frederick Kowal

President, United University Professions

Rebecca Pritchett

Lawyer, Prichett Environmental & Property Law, LLC

Norm Ritchie

Environmental Advocate and Volunteer; Licensed Engineer

John Robbins

Sportsman, Retired from Accenture, Managing Partner and COO of one of Accenture’s five global market units

Phil Roos

CEO, Rooster Works, LLC, CEO, Great Lakes GrowthWorks

Seth Ross

Conservationist

Truman Semans

Principal, Green Order, Inc.

Gloria Tom

Director, Navajo Nation Department of Fish and Wildlife

Mary Van Kerrebrook

Attorney, Van Kerrebrook & Associates, PC

Beth Viola

Senior Policy Advisor, Holland and Knight

Michael Bartlett

Retired from US Fish and Wildlife Service

Allyn Dukes

Operator of environmentally conscious fuel oil blending business

Cody Kamrowski

Natural Resource Planner, Wisconsin Northwest Regional Planning Commission

Jay Lanier

Account Executive, Interface Americas

Catherine Novelli

Former Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment, US State Department

Sally Ranney

President/Co-Founder, American Renewable Energy Institute (AREI) and AREDAY Summit; Co-Founder, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN); CEO, Stillwater Preservation, LLC (SWP)

Rob Speidel

Director of Research and Portfolio Manager, Everett Harris & Company

Siva Sundaresan

Wildlife Biologist and Wyoming Conservation Coordinator, Greater Yellowstone Coalition

Kathleen Hadley

Former Executive Director, National Center for Appropriate Technology

Arthur "Butch" Blazer

Former President, Mescalero Apache Tribe, southcentral New Mexico. Former Deputy Under Secretary of Agriculture, USDA.

Jomar Floyd

Associate, S&P Global Ratings

Miguel Ordenana

Community Services Manager and Wildlife Biologist for the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, CA

Dr. Mamie Parker

Principal of MA Parker and Associates, Executive Coach and Public Speaker. Former U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Assistant Director.

Stevie Kapanui Parsons

Outdoorswoman and Environmentalist

Rachel Sprague, Ph.D.

Director of Conservation, Pulama Lanai

John Salazar

Small business owner

Greer Tidwell

Director for Environmental Management, Bridgestone Tire Operations

Veronica Eady

Environmental Justice Liaison, California Air Resources Board

Nick Franchot

Partner and Vice President, Hall Capital Partners

E. Nordberg

CIO, Hollow Brook Association

Deborah Spalding

Deputy Chief Investment Officer and Managing Director, Commonfund

Eric Steinmiller

Principal, Bernstein Global Wealth Management

Collin O'Mara

Chief Executive Officer

Ben Kota

General Counsel

Karen Wagner

Chief Financial Officer

Tamara Johnson

Controller

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 09/14/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 09/02/2020

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.