The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington

Connect with Purpose

aka The Jewish Federation   |   North Bethesda, MD   |  www.shalomdc.org

Mission

The Jewish Federation mobilizes people to address the most critical opportunities and challenges facing our diverse and growing Jewish community. We empower and inspire community builders, leaders, and organizations to connect with purpose—joining together to build a strong and vibrant Jewish future. Vision for Our Community: An open, connected, and vibrant Jewish community that cares for each other, fosters Jewish learning and journeys, embraces Jewish peoplehood and Israel, and acts as a force for good in the world. Our Mission: To inspire, build, and sustain vibrant Jewish life in a changing world by mobilizing our community in common purpose, intentional innovation, and effective action.

Notes from the nonprofit

For more than 200 years, Jews in Greater Washington have been shaping the course of Jewish history and serving as vanguards of inspired Jewish life. The same sense of responsibility and optimism that first inspired DC’s Jews to coordinate local service efforts in 1925 continues to guide our work. We are committed to shaping a community that cares for each other, fosters Jewish learning and journeys, embraces Jewish peoplehood and Israel, and acts as a force for good in the world. Together, we can ensure that Jewish Greater Washington continues to grow and evolve, and that future generations can be part of something relevant and meaningful. We can stand up for the values we hold dear for the benefit of our community, our country, and our world. Greater Washington is where people come to create change and build a better future. We hope that as Federation moves forward with our work, we can continue to rely on your participation and support to do exactly that, well into the future.

Ruling year info

1941

Chief Executive Officer

Gil Preuss

Main address

6101 Executive Blvd. Suite 100

North Bethesda, MD 20852 USA

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EIN

53-0212445

NTEE code info

Philanthropy / Charity / Voluntarism Promotion (General) (T50)

Jewish (X30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Allocations to Beneficiary Agencies

The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington supports programs and services that care for those in need, deepen people's engagement in Jewish life, and connect Jews locally, in Israel and around the world. This is done through three main funding streams. The first is direct funding to 40 local agencies whose priorities and need fall in line with the Federation mission. Second, we grant funds to The Jewish Federations of North America, our partner agency in the US who distributes money to programs that support our mission overseas. Third and finally, we manage allocations made by donor advised funds, whereby a donor to federation recommends the program or service they specifically want their money to support. Donor advised funds help.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington strives to make Jewish life accessible to everyone, seamlessly connecting the diverse population that makes up the Jewish Community of Greater Washington. Regardless of a person's level of observance, interests, age or geography, there are countless ways one can experience and enjoy Jewish culture and tradition in our community. Our outreach and engagement programs reach out to isolated seniors, families with young children, newcomers and others to welcome them and invite them to be a part of our Jewish family. Program examples include: Camperships offer incentive grants to families who choose to send their children to Jewish overnight camp for the first time.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Connect with purpose with The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington. Our community can be a part of the largest Good Deeds Day effort in North America by joining over 6,000 local volunteers and more than 90 different community agencies for an annual day of volunteering. Additionally, community members can search through the Jewish community’s central address (jconnect.org) for meaningful service project ideas and volunteer opportunities throughout the year. Volunteers of all ages, backgrounds and interests can work together to make a positive impact on the lives of thousands of local families in need. Together, we can inspire social change by feeding the hungry, caring for the earth, supporting Holocaust survivors in need, and so much more through a shared passion for tikkun olam (repairing the world).

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of organizational partners

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total dollars received in contributions

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of Facebook followers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of local agencies supported

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Since the pandemic began, Federation has raised and repurposed millions of dollars to meet significant
challenges. We remain committed to seeing our community through the end of COVID-19 and to fostering
vibrant Jewish life well into the future. Our Plan for Communal Vibrancy defines three key priorities as the driving force behind our work for the coming two to four years:
• Meeting Individual & Family Needs
• Ensuring Success and Resilience of Jewish Communal Organizations
• Deepening Jewish Learning & Journeys

At the same time, caring for and strengthening our Jewish community remains at the core of Federation’s work. By leading with our values, we are committed to spearheading the essential social changes needed to make our community more vibrant and inclusive—locally, in Israel, and around the world.

Meeting Individual & Family Needs
COVID-19 exacerbated challenges for community members who faced adversity even before the pandemic. Today, even as we begin to look ahead to a post-pandemic world, we are seeing unprecedented levels of financial and food insecurity, mental health needs, and unemployment. Seeing the growing needs of our community this past year has revealed the need for a long-term strategy to address poverty in the Greater Washington community. Our new, integrated anti-poverty initiative is focused on food insecurity, housing/financial insecurity, job training and placement, and mental health and domestic abuse. In tackling these four areas, we expect to address the major stressors that present barriers to an individual’s/family’s ability to support themselves.

Ensuring Success and Resilience of Jewish Communal Organizations and Deepening Jewish Learning & Journeys
Strong community organizations are vital to building a vibrant Jewish future in Greater Washington. The essential, identity-building programs and experiences our local institutions provide are irreplaceable. At the same time, Jewish communal experiences are critical to cultivating and strengthening Jewish identity. We are ensuring that the rich diversity of Jewish opportunities in Greater Washington continue to be accessible to and meet the needs of our community for years to come.

Federation’s role as a central convener of Jewish Greater Washington has enabled us to take an overarching approach to meet cross-communal needs.

In addition to the millions we allocate annually to our partners, Federation regularly convenes local organizations to listen and collaborate on shared issues. One such conversation led to a particularly meaningful vaccine initiative partnership between Edlavitch DCJCC and Hillel at The George Washington University, now also
funded by Federation.

Through a significant investment in scholarships and financial aid, we are addressing pandemic-induced
financial barriers to Jewish life and working to increase participation in early childhood education, day
schools, and summer camps. In helping more families opt into Jewish experiences for their children, we
are also investing in the future leadership of our community.

Our partnerships across the Jewish community are crucial to Federation’s work to identify and
address the needs of our Jewish community.

In 2020, we allocated nearly $25 million to help individuals and families and to build and sustain vibrant Jewish life in a changing world.
• Federation supports 57 local agencies across DC, MD, and Northern VA, and is the largest single donor to more than half of these organizations.
• We continue to foster deep relationships with more than 60 congregations across the region and across denominations.
• Beyond Greater Washington, we partner with 14 national organizations and 15 Israel and overseas partners and programs.

As we work to meeting individual & family needs, by bringing together JSSA and our network of local human service agencies, Federation led the development of and fully funds 703-J-CARING: the Jewish Community Support Line. Launched in summer 2020, the support line has already connected more than 200 callers from across DC, MD, and Northern VA with resources available across the region.

Additionally:
- $2.9 million in allocated emergency funding is helping individuals and organizations stay afloat.
- Of dollars granted for COVID-19 relief, 40% has been put towards rent and mortgage payments. 1/3 has gone towards food assistance.
- 1,500 people across 78 DC, MD, and Northern VA zip codes accessed emergency assistance.
- Without immediate support this past year, Jewish agencies faced shuttering. Federation provided $1.86 million in funding to ensure they survived and could continue to serve our community. And when the Federal government approved the Small Business Administration Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), Federation worked to ensure that every local Jewish organization that applied for a loan was approved to receive one—infusing Jewish Greater Washington with $25 million in loans.
- $379,000+ in scholarships and financial aid is helping families attending day camps, overnight camps,
and to deepen the grant pool for Federation’s One Happy Camper program.
- $235,800+ is empowering more families to send their children to one of the nearly 40 local Jewish Early Childhood Education Centers, with a goal of increasing enrollment following a nearly 50% decline in those numbers due to the pandemic.
- $585,000+ is helping more families send their children to one of our region’s six Jewish day schools.

Learn more at shalomdc.org.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Jewish Federation serves the more than 300,000 members of the Jewish community of Greater Washington, across Washington, DC, suburban MD, and Northern VA. For more information about our community demographics, visit shalomdc.org/communitystudy.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington

Board of directors
as of 6/1/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mark Levitt

Paul Berger

Arnold & Porter LLP

Norman Pozez

Jocelyn Krifcher

Mark Levitt

Stuart Kaswell

Jane Shichman

Abby Cherner

Robin Hettleman Weinberg

Rick Zitelman

Scott Brown

Dan Conston

Liza Levy

Robert Zahler

Gil Preuss

Neil Gurvitch

Jeffrey Finkelstein

Jeffrey Rum

Jane Shichman

Brian Ashin

Neil Gurvitch

Julie Kass

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/01/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 06/01/2021

Policies and practices developed in partnership with Equity in the Center, a project that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems within the social sector to increase racial equity. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.