Washington Humane Society

Animals. People. Community

aka Humane Rescue Alliance   |   Washington, DC   |  humanerescuealliance.org

Mission

The Humane Rescue Alliance (HRA) protects animals, supports families, and advocates for positive change to create a world where all animals can thrive. We enrich the humanity of our communities by promoting compassion and encouraging people to find joy, comfort and companionship through the love and appreciation of animals.

Ruling year info

1937

President and CEO

Ms. Lisa LaFontaine

Main address

71 Oglethorpe St., NW

Washington, DC 20011 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-0219724

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

Personal Social Services (P50)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Approximately 6.5 million companion animals enter U.S. animal shelters nationwide every year, for a wide variety of reasons. Some animals are strays, while others are surrendered by owners, often due to behavior issues and costs associated with health issues. Each year, approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized and approximately 3.2 million are adopted. In addition to homelessness, and the threat of homelessness due to the rising cost of veterinary care, animals also face threats of violence, cruelty, and neglect.

The Humane Rescue Alliance (HRA) exists to protect and provide positive opportunities (including adoption) for homeless animals, provide financially struggling people with the resources they need to keep their pets healthy and at home, build awareness that will counteract neglect, fight deliberate cruelty, and build compassion and the human-animal bond.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Sheltering and Adoptions

As the only open-admission animal welfare agency in our nation's capital, HRA provides critical services 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. HRA never turns away a DC animal for any reason, and we place no time limits on an animal's stay in our care. We operate two full-service Adoption Centers in Washington, DC, where we house up to 400 dogs, cats, and other animals on any given day. We also rely on a large network of dedicated foster families who provide a home for animals that may be overwhelmed by shelter life or have specialized medical needs. In 2016, HRA created 5,486 new families through adoption and housed 1,056 animals in foster care.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HRA's Oglethorpe facility is home to both a Medical Center that offers high-quality, low-cost medical treatments to privately-owned animals, as well as a new high-volume surgical suite that is utilized for our spay/neuter clinics and shelter animals. Through generous gifts from donors and granting organizations, we are able to offer free preventive and emergency care to owners who would otherwise have to surrender their beloved pet.

Population(s) Served
Adults

A common reason for pets being returned to animal shelters is an existing behavioral problem that keeps the pet from living successfully in a home. We work to prevent these returns by giving every animal a behavioral assessment before they can be made available for adoption. The opportunity for learning doesn't end with adoption; HRA offers affordable group and private training sessions to teach pet guardians the best practices in obedience training and eliminating problematic behaviors.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Since 1870, the Washington Humane Society has been tasked with protecting the animals of the District from abuse and neglect. Our HLE officers work closely with the Metropolitan Police Department to rescue animals and apprehend abusers, bringing them to justice through the court system. In 2016, our HLE officers protected 3,506 animals in DC.

Population(s) Served
Adults

In homes where there is domestic abuse, it's not just the people who are at risk - animals are often targeted, as well. We offer 24/7 help for victims of domestic violence who are concerned about the safety of their pets.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HRA contracts with the government of Washington, DC to provide animal control services for the entire city, including sick or injured wildlife. Last year, our Animal Control officers touched the lives of 22,077 animals.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HRA partners with shelters locally and regionally through our Shelter Animal Relief Effort (ShARE) Program. Through the ShARE Program, HRA assists overburdened shelters by transferring animals from partner shelters to our facilities. In 2016, we received 1,217 animals from partner organizations.

Population(s) Served
Adults

HOPE is a community-based initiative that provides people and animals in traditionally underserved areas of DC with important resources. We offer a variety of pet services to program clients at no charge, including spay/neuter surgeries, vaccinations, food and other supplies, and behavior/training assistance. Through door-to-door outreach and community events this program provides a critical lifeline that helps keep pets in loving homes and out of shelters.

Population(s) Served
Adults

As part of the HRA Humane Education program, a dedicated humane educator visits DC-area elementary schools to promote kindness and compassion toward both animals and people. Students are invited to tour our facilities with their school groups, and follow a specially crafted curriculum that teaches responsibility and helps students feel empowered to give their voice to animals. In 2016, 1,250 young people were reached through humane education.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Cat Neighborhood Partnership Program (CatNiPP) is aimed at addressing the needs of the thousands of community cats living in the District and of the people who co-exist with them. Feral and stray cats who are not good candidates for adoption are trapped, vaccinated, sterilized and ear tipped -- the universal symbol for a community cat that has been spayed/neutered. 1,879 cats were trapped, neutered, and released in 2016.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of animals spayed and neutered

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Veterinary Center

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We spay and neuter all shelter animals and provide free and low cost services to the community, and for community cats across DC and northern New Jersey (as of 2019 for NJ).

Number of clients participating in educational programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Humane Education

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We provide humane education, where young people participate in our programs, camps, reading groups and other activities.

Number of animals rescued

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering and Adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This includes the intake number of stray animals, owner surrenders, animals transferred from other organizations, and animals cared for through Humane Law Enforcement, Animal Control, and Safe Haven.

Number of animals rehomed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Sheltering and Adoptions

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Number of animals adopted to homes or transferred to partners from our shelters in Washington, DC and northern New Jersey (as of 2019 for NJ). Our Live Release Rate is 90-95%

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

HRA is the premier animal welfare organization in the District of Columbia and among the largest in our region. Our top priority is the care and safety of animals in the District. We never turn away a DC animal, and never place time limits on the amount of time they need in our care to find permanent homes. Every day, we work toward the goal of a world where all animals are wanted and supplied with basic veterinary care, healthy food, companionship, and none are abused or neglected. This vision is not only the best outcome for animals, but also for human beings. We work primarily in the District of Columbia, but partner with other organizations both nationally and internationally to tackle issues like the rising cost of veterinary care, population disparities of animals like dogs and cats (which leads to too few in some regions, and far too many in others), and challenges of urbanization.

HRA's comprehensive set of programs and services encompass our strategies for success. These programs include - sheltering and adoptions; veterinary services; animal care and control; humane law enforcement; behavior and training classes; Help Out, Partner, and Engage (HOPE) program; Safe Haven; humane education; Cat Neighborhood Partnership Program (CatNiPP); and Shelter Animal Relief Effort. You can find detailed descriptions of each in the programs section of this report.

HRA is well positioned to carry out our current programs and expand strategies to reduce animal homelessness, build the human-animal bond, and address emerging issues. Because of the merger which created HRA in 2016, the District of Columbia is now one of a very few urban areas in the U.S. where all animal-community needs are met under one roof. We see the full scope of needs across our community, and can use that knowledge to fine-tune our current programs and create new ones. We also have strong partnerships with other organizations, including local animal welfare groups, national animal welfare leaders, and regional community service groups, which enables us to share our expertise and to benefit from that of others. With an experienced and visionary CEO and a dedicated Board of Directors, HRA is committed to saving more lives, more comprehensively serving our community, and becoming a national model and resource.

HRA completed a major merger in 2016, bringing together our city's two biggest animal welfare groups. Also in 2016, we successfully ran a comprehensive set of programs, reaching across our region.

Over the next three years, HRA plans to grow both by expanding our programs and developing our new facility in Southeast DC. We hope to open the facility by 2021 or 2022, and from it better serve a wide community on both sides of the Anacostia River. The new facility itself will be a community gathering place, where people strengthen their bond with animals. It will be a hub for low-cost veterinary care and adoptions.

In addition, we will work with national and international groups to take on some of the biggest issues in animal welfare (and human-animal interactions), including the rising cost of veterinary care, and the need to transport animals from overcrowded, rural shelters to urban areas where adopters are more plentiful.

Financials

Washington Humane Society
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Washington Humane Society

Board of directors
as of 10/20/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Greg Riegle

McGuire Woods

Term: 2017 - 2020

Nina Benton

NA

Steven Bralove

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

Priscilla Clapp

NA

Louie Dweck

NA

Theresa Fariello

United Airlines

Kenton Keith

Meridian Internation

Erika Kelton

Phillips & Cohen LLP

Lisa LaFontaine

Humane Rescue Alliance

Laird Patterson

N/A

Charles Weir

N/A

Drew Willison

Oldaker & Willison

Gwyn Whittaker

GreenFare

Gregory Riegle

McGuireWoods LLP

Jeff Wilson

TTR Sotheby's International

Mary Schapiro

Bloomberg LP

Jackie Dobranski

Dobranski Family Foundation

Leslie Harris

Leslie Harris & Associates

Joseph Howe

Arnold & Porter

Susan Ridge

Johns Hopkins

Carol Schwartz

Lois Godfrey Wye

Department of Interior

Erica Scherzer

Lauren Talarico

VCA Southpaws

Cynthiana Lightfoot

Children's Natl Health System

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/25/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Decline to state
Disability status
Decline to state

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data