PLATINUM2024

The Humane Society of The United States HQ

We fight the big fights to end suffering for all animals.

aka The HSUS   |   Washington, DC   |  humanesociety.org

Mission

We fight the big fights to end suffering for all animals. Together with millions of supporters, we take on puppy mills, factory farms, the fur trade, trophy hunting, animal cosmetic and chemicals testing and other cruel industries. Through our rescue, response and sanctuary work, as well as other hands-on animal care services, we help thousands of animals every year. We fight all forms of animal cruelty to achieve the vision behind our name: a humane society.

Ruling year info

1956

President and CEO

Kitty Block

Main address

1255 23rd Street, NW, Suite 450

Washington, DC 20037 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-0225390

NTEE code info

Animal Protection and Welfare (includes Humane Societies and SPCAs) (D20)

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (D01)

Wildlife Sanctuary/Refuge (D34)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Animals are vulnerable to many forms of cruelty and abuse. Existing laws enshrine many forms of extreme cruelty as legal, including some standard practices in factory farming, raising and killing animals for their fur, poorly regulated commercial breeding of dogs for the pet trade, cosmetics and product testing, trophy hunting and the use of animals in entertainment and competition. Animals are at risk during natural disasters and because of acts of intentional cruelty and neglect, with many communities lacking the resources needed to address their needs. Animals with complex needs require permanent sanctuary. The presence of wild animals in our communities is too often and erroneously considered a problem or nuisance, with lethal results. These are the challenges that the Humane Society of the United States takes on and succeeds at addressing.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

End the cruelest practices

We fight the worst, most institutionalized forms of animal abuse and cruelty around the world. Our current priorities include ending cosmetic and chemicals testing on animals, reducing the trophy hunting of wildlife, ending the use of fur in fashion, easing the suffering of billions of farm animals by eliminating cruel systems of confinement and ensuring that puppy mills can no longer sell puppies via pet stores in the United States.

Population(s) Served

As we work for a humane future, we alleviate the suffering happening today. We respond to cruelty and disasters where the need is greatest, advance tactics that reduce the use of lethal and cruel animal management approaches and provide transport and sanctuary to animals in crisis. Our landmark sanctuary Black Beauty Ranch is home to animals in need of lifelong care, many representing species that shelters and local humane societies are typically not equipped to care for or place for adoption. Were there for the most vulnerable populations around the world as we focus on lasting solutions.

Population(s) Served

We empower our allies to fight for all animals locally, nationally and globally. Many hands, hearts and minds make lighter work. Energizing our movement to drive changethrough advocacy, direct care, education, enforcement of laws, even consumer choice is fundamental to achieving the end of animal cruelty. Our mission includes helping those who stand with us become stronger. We have been a leader in increasing equity in access to veterinary care and other resources and are currently expanding this work in U.S. Native communities.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance 2021

Awards

Workplace Excellence Seal of Approval 2019

Alliance for Workplace Excellence

EcoLeadership Award 2019

Alliance for Workplace Excellence

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total value of U.S. fur apparel imports

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We are working to end the sale of fur in the U.S. and are measuring our progress by the value of fur apparel that is imported each year into the U.S.

Number of puppy-selling pet stores

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Decreasing

Context Notes

We aim to stop the sale of puppies in pet stores, since most puppies sold in pet stores come from puppy mills. We are measuring our progress by the number of puppy-selling pet stores in the U.S.

Number of states that prohibit wildlife killing contests

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

In our effort to end trophy hunting, we are focusing on banning wildlife killing contests at the state level. We are measuring our progress by the number of state laws.

Percentage of U.S. population living in a state that bans animal cosmetic testing and trade

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are working to end animal cosmetic testing and trade. We are tracking our progress by measuring the percentage of the U.S. population living in a state that bans these practices.

Percentage of U.S. egg industry that is cage-free

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

End the cruelest practices

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

We are working to end the extreme confinement of egg-laying hens and are tracking our progress using USDA data on the percentage of hens in the egg industry who are cage-free.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Stop puppy mills: A puppy mill is a high-volume breeding facility that churns out puppies for profit, typically housing pups and their mothers in substandard conditions with little or no veterinary care. The majority of puppies sold in pet stores and online are from puppy mills. Our current focus is on ending the sale of puppies in pet stores.

End the use of fur in fashion: Millions of rabbits, foxes, mink and other wild animals spend their entire lives in cramped cages, only to be gassed or electrocuted for their fur. In the wild, animals are caught in crippling leghold traps for days without food or water--all in the name of fashion. Our current focus is on ending the sale of fur in the U.S.

End cosmetic and chemicals animal testing: Although many non-animal testing methods already exist and many ingredients already have a history of safe use, animals in laboratories still suffer and die for our cosmetics and chemicals. Currently, animal testing is legally required for many of the products used every dayfrom fragrances to painkillers to fabric dyes. Our current focus is to end animal testing for these products.

End trophy hunting: Each year, hundreds of thousands of animals are killed by trophy hunters, whose primary motivation is simply to obtain animal parts for display and bragging rights. Trophy hunters use cruel methods like baiting and hounding, shoot animals in captive hunts and participate in gruesome wildlife killing contests. Our current focus is to reduce the number of African lions, leopards and elephants being imported as trophies into the U.S.

End the use of cages for egg-laying hens: On factory farms, egg-laying hens are kept in cages so small they can barely move. Our near-term goal is to reach the milestone of the majority of egg-laying hens in the U.S. being raised cage-free.

Expand access to care: There are 20 million pets living with families experiencing poverty in the U.S., many of whom are at risk of entering shelters due to housing restrictions, lack of behavioral and health resources, or lack of pet care supplies. We believe everyone deserves the love of a pet, regardless of financial, structural or geographic barriers. To that end, we advocate for policies that help overcome these barriers, deliver pet care resources to underserved communities, and train veterinary professionals on establishing and maintaining access-to-care efforts. Our near-term goal is to expand this work in U.S. Native communities.

The HSUS addresses the root cause of animal suffering, which requires changing the legal framework governing the treatment of animals and the practices of large-scale industries, as well as winning the hearts and minds of the American public.

Strengthening public policy and enforcement: Were strengthening legal protections for animals at the local, state and national levels in the United States, and in a growing number of countries through our global arm, Humane Society International. We defend those victories in court and press for robust enforcement of existing policies.

Improving corporate policy: We work with the worlds biggest food and apparel companies, cosmetics manufacturers and leaders in other industries to improve the treatment of animals. We make the case that caring about animal welfare is good for business, but we also use scorecards, media coverage and other channels for evaluating and encouraging further progress in the industries we target.

Training and capacity building: We invest in activities that lift up the whole animal protection movement, engaging and training volunteers, animal advocates, shelter and rescue professionals, educators and law enforcement officers across the country on issues like investigating and prosecuting animal cruelty, expanding access to veterinary care, resolving human-wildlife conflicts and effective citizen lobbying. We offer HumanePro, a comprehensive resource for anyone who works or volunteers with animals, from shelter staffers to veterinary professionals, including our annual Animal Care Expo, the largest conference for animal sheltering and rescue professionals.

Rescue and direct care: We and our affiliates provide hands-on care for thousands of animals every year, caring for horses, companion animals and wildlife. We respond to major cruelty cases and natural disasters, arrange veterinary care and spay/neuter services for pets in underserved U.S. communities and much more.

Education and awareness: The HSUS reaches tens of millions of people through its website and social media platforms, award-winning videos and magazines, training and educational conferences for animal advocates, national media outreach and more. Were driving the wider conversation around animals, encouraging everyone to join us in creating a culture that lives up to the promise of our name: A humane society.

We have developed internal expertise around challenges facing specific types of animals, as well as expertise in the tactics we employ to achieve lasting change. But our staff members are our greatest strength, including:

Subject-matter experts: We employ staff specialists working on issues facing farm animals, companion animals, wildlife and animals used in research.

Corporate campaigners: Our teams include experts in corporate campaigns, who have brokered agreements with companies and institutions to make food supply chains more humane, increase plant-based options in institutional dining, go fur-free, commit to alternatives to animal testing, adopt non-lethal management strategies and more.

State public policy experts: Many laws that affect animals are generated at the state and local levels, so our state directors work to advance legislation, develop coalitions and engage with volunteers and partners in support of our policy goals. They also support the work of local humane societies and carry out public awareness and other initiatives designed to advance our priorities.

Attorneys: An in-house team of lawyers provides legislative, regulatory and litigation support to our priority programs and campaigns. The members of our animal protection legal team are responsible for helping to draft legislation and administrative rules, defending laws when they are challenged in court, submitting petitions to drive agency action, and proactively bringing lawsuits to support animal protection interests.

Investigators: Oftentimes the most insidious forms of animal abuse happen behind closed doors and out of the public view. For those situations, our team of investigators work to expose animal abuse and suffering through undercover investigations at pet stores, wildlife killing contests, slaughterhouses and more.

Outreach and training experts: We are committed to strengthening the animal protection movement and engaging more people in our work. Our outreach team provides training and resources to government agencies, animal shelters, veterinarians and individual advocates and volunteers to make sure they have the tools they need to improve the lives of animals.

Volunteers: Our robust volunteer infrastructure includes hundreds of volunteers trained and ready to engage on priority issues. Our volunteers are organized by congressional district and play a leadership role in our advocacy efforts.

Communications experts: Our communications teams prepare and present compelling stories about animals with the goal of increasing awareness, influencing hearts and minds, and inspiring our membership to take action.

In 2023, we had a landmark victory in the U.S. Supreme Court, which upheld a California farm animal protection law we helped to pass. Here are details about that case, as well as some of our other major areas of progress:

Stop puppy mills: We achieved one of our top priorities of 2023 when Oregon became the seventh U.S. state to prohibit the sale of puppies in pet stores. We also helped pass 37 local humane pet store ordinances, bringing our total to more than 480. Our annual Horrible Hundred reports, which expose mass breeding operations where dogs are suffering, led to the rescue of nearly 500 dogs in 2023 alone.

End the use of fur in fashion: We helped two more U.S. citiesEtna, Pennsylvania and Lexington, Massachusetts ban new fur sales, bringing the number of existing bans to 14 cities plus California. Our corporate campaign asking Dillards, the last major U.S. department store to sell fur, to go fur-free resulted in the store removing all fur items from its website.

End animal cosmetic and chemicals testing: We helped Oregon become the 11th state to ban the sale of cosmetics tested on animals and pressed for a law in Illinois that bans the use of dogs and cats in toxicity testing unless such testing is explicitly deemed necessary by a federal agency. Maryland became the first state to require laboratories that test on animals to contribute to a fund providing grants for scientists using or developing non-animal research alternatives.

End the use of cages for egg-laying hens: The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Californias Proposition 12, which requires that mother pigs, egg-laying hens and calves raised for veal in the state are not cruelly confined; the law also bans the in-state sale of pork, eggs and veal produced via extreme confinement. We led the campaign to pass the measure in 2017 and have been instrumental in defending it in the courts, including at the Supreme Court.

End trophy hunting: We successfully defeated multiple attempts to allow trophy hunting of bears in Connecticut and Florida and wolves in Minnesota. In Washington state, we helped to defeat a bill that would have taken wolves off the states endangered species list. In Oregon and New York, two states where we exposed the cruelty of wildlife killing contests with undercover investigations, lawmakers banned the brutal practice.


Expand access to care: We helped 44,600 dogs and cats across the U.S, in cities large and small and communities in rural and remote areas. In our 14 core communities, we helped over 14,000 animals and provided 66,000 health services worth almost $2.3 million at no cost to pet owners. In our more than 50 mentorship/supported communities, we provided over 100,000 pet care services to 30,600 animals and gave out $2 million in grants. We also distributed 8.9 million pounds of food and 2,233 pallets of pet supplies, with a combined value of over $30 million.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

Financials

The Humane Society of The United States
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

The Humane Society of The United States

Board of directors
as of 03/22/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Charles Laue

Susan Atherton

Yolanda Berkowitz

Georgina Bloomberg

J. Elizabeth Bradham

Carolyn N. Everson

Caren M. Fleit

Robert Greenspon

Brad Jakeman

Cathy Kangas

Sylvia Kaser

Aditya Kumar

Charles A. Laue

C. Thomas McMillen

David Niekerk

Thomas J. Sabatino Jr.

Suzy Welch

Wayne Flick

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 3/4/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

Transgender Identity

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/03/2023

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.