PLATINUM2024

United Way of the National Capital Area

Live United

aka UWNCA   |   Vienna, VA   |  https://www.unitedwaynca.org

Mission

United Way improves lives of underserved individuals in the national capital area by focusing community resources on creating measurable and lasting impact.

Notes from the nonprofit

Your United Way has always sought to be the ear for the voices in our communities eager to be heard on education and financial disparities, food and medical insecurities, mental health, homelessness, and needs during times of crisis. We listen. We convene and collaborate with like-minded partners. We use our resources to be a catalyst for change. We know that the issues of inequity in our systems for employment, education, health and food access, financial stability and opportunities for all to grow to the best of their abilities are not going to change unless we do the work. At United Way NCA, we’re reserving a seat for all community members who are ready to join our efforts as we mobilize and make bold strides until we achieve equity for all of our community members, regardless of race, gender, income and ability. NOW is the time to stand for EQUITY and LIVE UNITED. Join the Movement!

Ruling year info

1974

President and Chief Executive Officer

Rosie Allen-Herring

Main address

8614 Westwood Center Drive Suite 300

Vienna, VA 22182 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-0234290

NTEE code info

Community Improvement, Capacity Building N.E.C. (S99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

Fund Raising Organizations That Cross Categories includes Community Funds/Trusts and Federated Giving Programs) e.g. United Way (T70)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2022, 2021 and 2020.
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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

For almost 50 years, United Way of the National Capital Area has worked to change the lives of people and families in the Washington Metropolitan Area. We mobilize all sectors of the community to work together with one goal: helping youth and families thrive by reducing disparities and increasing equity. We address our communities’ needs by focusing on three key pillars of impact: health, education, and economic opportunity. By investing in the most effective services, we’re tackling the area’s most complex social challenges every day. As a leading regional community convener, we are skilled in breaking down silos and building cross-sector partnerships in our region. To best serve the community’s needs, we lead public and private service providers in building an integrated system of inclusive prosperity. With our Community Impact programs, we work with government, educational, and community institutions across the region to deliver services and advocate for economic equity for all.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Financial Empowerment Centers

United Way of the National Capital Area's Financial Empowerment Centers provide services to help individuals and families advance on a path toward financial stability. These centers help lift up individuals and families with services that range from money management counseling, credit and housing counseling, asset-building resources and access to free or low-cost banking products.

Population(s) Served
Adults

United Way NCA collaborates with best-in-class nonprofit organizations to convene partners and services within local middle schools to address the academic and non-academic needs of students and families facing economic hardship. In aligning with the Community School model, the integrated focus on academics, health and social services, youth and community development and community engagement leads to improved student learning, stronger families and healthier across the Greater Washington DC area.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of basic needs provided to low-income students and families

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth, Families, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Distributed 4,500 food, hygiene, and warm clothing kits through PHC (now Project Community Connect) to neighbors, who are at risk of or experiencing homelessness.

Number of individuals with improved financial stability (and financial confidence)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Economically disadvantaged people, Veterans

Related Program

Financial Empowerment Centers

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

12,559 residents received financial coaching, budget counseling, and free tax services through FEC programs & VITA Services to help improve credit and savings. Nearly $1.4M in savings.

Number of schools financed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Through United Way NCA's fundraising campaigns, we have provided more than $1,113,250 to benefit our Education programs in the past 3 years.

Number of students enrolled

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Schools

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Supported 4,956 low-income middle school students in performing at or above grade level and successfully transitioning to high school through our Title I community schools across the region.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Six years ago, United Way NCA launched its first Community Commitment to tackle complex, interconnected issues like poor health, school graduation, and poverty. This strategic initiative included three goals: (1) Help children and adults in our community thrive through an integrated approach to health and wellness that fights childhood obesity and creates good habits for life. (2) Prepare 12,000 low-income middle school students to transition to high school, perform at grade level, and stay on track to succeed. (3) Help 100,000 area residents achieve financial stability and remove barriers to stable and affordable housing.

Looking forward, United Way NCA continues its community commitment centered around its three program pillars: health, education, and economic opportunity. Our health-specific programs will decrease disparities in the community by removing systemic barriers to food security, promoting healthy physical exercise and choices for students and families, as well as providing mental health support to decrease stigma in the community. We will focus on Title I middle schools across the region in Education, including the Community Schools model and evidence-based programming to support students along the middle to high school pipeline with the goal of decreasing disparities and closing gaps in the high school graduation rates, postsecondary enrollment, and employment. To further economic opportunities across United Way NCA's communities, our goal is to expand and deepen access to financial coaching, wealth building, workforce development and tax-time services to close the gaps in financial instability and promote economic equity across the National Capital Region.

United Way NCA addresses the needs of our community through three pillars of impact: health, education, and economic opportunity. Our programs are focused on serving the ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) population -- households that earn more than the Federal Poverty Level, but less than the basic cost of living for the county/state.

Our health and wellness program, Healthy Mind/Healthy Body, focuses on addressing food access and insecurity, and increasing physical activity for students and their families. We are also addressing critical mental health issues in the community through our Mental Health First Aid program and telehealth program that provides community members with access to professional therapists using remote technology, at no cost.
In education, United Way NCA has operated a regional community schools initiative since 2015, supporting students at Title 1 middle schools to successfully transition to high school. United Way NCA is expanding this initiative to support students who have gotten behind academically due to school shutdowns, while providing wraparound services that address broader challenges students are facing due to COVID-19, including family economic instability. The approach includes two strategies: expanding our work to feeder high schools associated with our middle schools to ensure student success in the long-term, and including evidence-based programs that mitigate risk factors and enhance protective factors in the journey from middle school to high school graduation.

To improve economic opportunity, United Way NCA operates the region’s first set of one-stop Financial Empowerment Centers, which offer working families high-quality financial capability services, such as personalized financial coaching and housing counseling, in a professional setting at no cost. In response to COVID-19, we have expanded this work to include a deeper focus on workforce development, supporting those who have lost wages due to COVID-19 in accessing benefits intended to get them through this period, and supporting them in their return to work.

As our region recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic, United Way NCA has redoubled its efforts to meet the educational, economic, and health and wellbeing needs of thousands of youths and adults across our region, with a focus on addressing systemic inequities. Through strong governance, experienced leadership, and prudent fiscal management, United Way NCA delivers on the promised programmatic outcomes associated with its annual commitment to the community and funds the organization’s emergency response and recovery efforts associated with the financial, educational and health-related devastation caused by the pandemic and experienced by those individuals and families most vulnerable and least capable of absorbing the pandemic’s negative impact. This allows us to pursue our mission and improve the quality of life for individuals and families across the National Capital Area.

Historically, United Way NCA has followed the traditional United Way model of serving as a community fundraiser and allocator of resources to the nonprofit community. Since 2014, United Way NCA has moved in a bold new direction and joined other United Ways across the international network in assuming the current business model of operating as a community impact organization. This transformative approach allows United Way NCA to target its resources and leverage its convening power to solve a focused set of critical challenges facing the community. United Way NCA utilizes its expertise in convening, catalyzing and collaborating to drive forward this critical work in service to its communities. We are proud to leverage our network of over 500 nonprofit members, our corporate partnerships, and the power of our brand to achieve our community commitment.

Since we launched our first Community Commitment in 2015, United Way NCA has achieved solid outputs:
● Surpassed our goal of supporting 12,000 (total of 14,547 or + 20% over goal) low-income middle school students in performing at or above grade level and successfully transitioning to high school through our 13 Title I community schools across the region.
● 102,419 area residents received free financial and tax services, elevating their financial circumstances so they have a real chance to be firmly rooted in the middle class.
● Put nearly $103.5M back in the pockets of working families’ tax refunds by offering no-cost tax preparation and access to the Earned Income Tax Credit.
● Convened over 1,800 volunteers and 230 providers to bring over 2,030 of our neighbors, who are at risk of or experiencing homelessness, much-needed resources like employment information, access to vital records, housing information, and dental and medical services, through Project Homeless Connect (now Project Community Connect).
● Provided 4.26 million meals to food-insecure students and families.
● Helped save residents nearly $15M in prescription costs through our SingleCare program.
In response to the impact of COVID-19, United Way NCA reactivated its Emergency Assistance Fund (EAF) to promote the health, education, and financial stability of our community, especially those residents who have been impacted by restrictions and closures of schools, business, and community institutions. As we forged together to stop the spread of COVID-19, United Way NCA raised more than $2 million to support the immediate and longer-term community needs related to the pandemic. Support from the fund provided:
• 437,423 meals and groceries delivered
• 77,766 individuals served
• 30,000 masks were delivered to 27 organizations
• 30,021 families received food and basic services
• 8,459 healthy and nutritious meals were delivered to frontline healthcare workers at 20 hospitals across the region
• 1,696 individuals received medical or health assistance
• 1,000 hygiene kits were provided to those most in need
• 729 individuals received educational assistance or financial aid
• 635 meals were delivered to seniors
• 622 individuals from low-income communities received housing and utility assistance

Financials

United Way of the National Capital Area
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

United Way of the National Capital Area

Board of directors
as of 02/07/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Gary Tabach

Managing Partner for Deloitte LLP, Greater Washington Practice

Term: 2015 -

Ken Samet, FACHE

President & CEO; MedStar Health

Gary Tabach

Managing Partner, Deloitte LLP, Greater Washington Practice

Kevin Virostek

Managing Partner, Ernst & Young, Greater Washington Area

Steve Proctor

President & CEO, G.S. Proctor & Associates

Angela Franco

President & CEO, DC Chamber of Commerce

David Velazquez

President & CEO, Pepco Holdings, Inc

Tamika Tremaglio

Managing Principal, Greater Washington, Deloitte Touche

Rachel Kronowitz

Founder and Senior Partner, Gilbert LLP

James W. Cornelsen

Chairman of the Mid-Atlantic Region, WesBanco Bank

Evelyn Lee

President Greater Washington Region, Truist Financial Corporation

Evan Kraus

President & Managing Director of Operations, APCO

Martin Rodgers

Sr. Managing Director-US Southeast and Metro WA DC, Accenture

Wendy Morton-Huddleston

Principal, Grant Thornton LLP

Michelle Rice

President, TV ONE and CLEO TV

Staci Pies

Vice President of Gov. & Regulatory Affairs, Crown Castle

Richard K. Bynum

Chief Corporate Responsibility Officer, PNC Bank

Elliot Ferguson

President & CEO, Destination DC

Richard Dyer

Sr. Vice President TEGNA, Inc.

Terri McClements

Marketing Managing Partner, PWC

Joshua Etemadi

Owner, District Bonding LLC

Tracy Kenny

Partner-in-Charge (Audit Chesapeake Business Unit), KPMG LLP

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 11/9/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American
Gender identity
Female
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

Equity strategies

Last updated: 11/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.