National Gallery of Art

Hyattsville, MD   |  www.nga.gov

Mission

The Gallery's mission is to serve the nation by welcoming all people to explore and experience art, creativity, and our shared humanity.

Ruling year info

1965

Principal Officer

Kaywin D Feldman

Main address

2000 S Club Dr

Hyattsville, MD 20785 United States

EIN

53-6001666

NTEE code info

Art Museums (A51)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

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Our programs

SOURCE: IRS Form 990

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Program 1

COLLECTIONSThe National Gallery of Art's collection is at the heart of the Gallery's mission, following founder Andrew W. Mellon's gift and mandate to establish a national gallery with works of the highest quality. The collection of paintings, sculpture, and decorative arts traces the development of European achievements from the thirteenth century to the present and American art from colonial times to the present. It comprises a comprehensive study of Italian Renaissance art, including the only painting by Leonardo da Vinci outside Europe, as well as strong holdings of the French Impressionists, the Dutch and Flemish masters, one of the country's most distinguished American collections, and twentieth-century art. The collection also includes prints, drawings, rare books and photographs. Major post-World War II sculpture is installed in a dynamic and richly landscaped setting in the National Gallery Sculpture Garden. During the fiscal year, 1,014 important works of art were acquired by the Gallery, continuing the growth of the painting, sculpture, prints and drawing, and photography collections. Of these, fifteen paintings, five sculptures, 228 prints and drawings, and 766 photographs entered the collection. Of special significance was the group of forty works by twenty-one African American artists from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation. This richly diverse collection included paintings, quilts, sculptures, and drawings by such well-known artists as Mary Lee Bendolph, Irene Williams, Thornton Dial, James "Son Ford" Thomas, and Lonnie Holley. Jaune Quick-to-See Smith became the first Native American artist represented in the Gallery with the purchase of her major painting, "I See Red: Target" (1992). Important additions of Old Master paintings to the collection included three seventeenth-century Dutch masterworks - Jan Brueghel the Elder's "Wooded Landscape with Travelers" (1610), Dirck Hals' "Merry Company on a Terrace" (1625), and Adriaen Coorte's "Still Life with a Hanging Bunch of Grapes, Two Medlars, and a Butterfly" (1687). Flemish artist Frans Snyders' "Still Life with Flowers, Grapes, and Small Game Birds" (c. 1615) became the second painting by this important figure in the Gallery's collection. Representation of nineteenth-century French "plein air" (outdoor) sketching was enhanced by the addition of Achille-Etna Michallon's exquisite "The Forum at Pompeii" (1819). Notable prints and drawing acquisitions during the year included a group of nineteenth-century British drawings, and examples of prints and fine illustrated volumes acquisitions included Marcus Vigerius' "Decachordum Christianum" (1507), with nine full-page woodcuts, and George-Louis Le Rouge's, "Les Jardins Anglo-Chinois" (1776-1787), with 486 etched plates in four volumes. Other acquisitions included a group of eighteenth-century German etchings; Umberto Boccioni's rare color etching, "Lago con cigni" (1908); unique impressions of two untitled etchings by Eva Hesse (1957-1958); and five prints of various techniques by Emma Amos (1980/2002). Among the department of photographs acquisitions during the fiscal year were major pieces by such nineteenth-century photographers as Gioacchino Altobelli, Mathew Brady, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Eadweard Muybridge. Among the twentieth- and twenty-first-century additions are photographs by such celebrated practitioners as Thomas Demand, Paul Graham, Richard Mosse, Irving Penn, and Minor White. The collection was also greatly diversified with additions by such women photographers as Lillian Bassman, Ilse Bing, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Susan Hiller, Lotte Jacobi, Barbara Morgan, and Sabine Weiss, and such African American photographers as Louis Draper, John Edmunds, Lorna Simpson, Beuford Smith, Ming Smith, Mickalene Thomas, and James Van Der Zee. The department also received a major gift of more than 160 photographs which included work by Ansel Adams, Robert Adams, Eugne Atget, William Eggleston, Andre Kertsz, Charles Marville, and Edward Weston.Preserving the Gallery's outstanding collection for future generations is a vital responsibility and primary concern of its conservators and scientists. Even during the pandemic, conservators and scientists specializing in the care of paintings, objects, photographs, works on paper, textiles, and frames undertook and collaborated on treatments, examinations, and research to preserve the collection and improve our understanding of works of art. The Gallery's conservators performed twenty major treatments, 557 minor treatments, 162 major examinations, 1,988 minor examinations, and 1,430 condition examinations for exhibitions. Matting and framing staff prepared 1,398 works of art for display and storage, and the frame conservator treated forty-eight frames. The preventive conservation team placed three paintings in microclimate packages for loans to institutions. Conservation scientists completed fourteen analysis reports to support investigation and treatments of works. Six marble sculptures were treated in public view in the West Building's East Sculpture Hall during the fiscal year. Donald Judd's "Untitled, 1963", one of his earliest "box" sculptures, was treated before sending it to the "Judd" retrospective exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. In collaboration with the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Gallery conservators and scientists undertook research to characterize Judd's painting techniques and materials. Photograph conservators completed numerous treatments and examinations, many in preparation for the upcoming exhibition, "The New Woman Behind the Camera". Textile and object conservators collaborated on the treatment and preparation of a special storage housing for a time-based media work, "Ommah", by Nam June Paik. The painting conservation department completed multiple major treatments, including Rembrandt's "Philemon and Baucis", 1658. In addition to providing expert care for works of art, Gallery conservators and scientists support many Gallery-wide programs, participate in professional meetings and conferences, and publish technical papers that make available the results of research undertaken at the Gallery. This research supports and enhances conservation practices around the world.

Expenses
$60,585,884
Revenue
$144,962

EDUCATION, GALLERY SHOPS AND PUBLIC PROGRAMSFiscal year 2020 began with the Gallery open to the public as usual, offering a variety of onsite and digital experiences to the public. The Gallery closed in March 2020 due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, and onsite programs were unavoidably canceled. Although the Gallery remained closed for most of the remainder of the fiscal year, the Gallery's outreach and educational programs continued through a significant expansion of its virtual programs providing some respite and sense of community for audiences in Washington, across the nation, and around the world. Until the Gallery closed due to the pandemic, approximately 90,000 visitors participated in several onsite offerings including programs for teachers and students, workshops for families, community weekends, public tours, the popular evening program "NGA Nights", and lectures, including programs for audiences with disabilities. Beginning in March 2020, the Gallery leveraged existing digital resources and, as the pandemic extended, began creating virtual programs and new resources to connect people of all ages with art and each other remotely. The Gallery reached approximately 25,000 people through virtual programs and nearly forty million through digital resources and films shown on public television. Recognizing the impact of the pandemic on schools, the Gallery reached out to teachers to understand their needs and how to best support them during this particularly challenging time. The annual "Summer Teacher Institute" was offered online and served double the number of teachers historically served onsite. A variety of digital resources for educators as well as online professional development opportunities were offered, including an online course which has surpassed 20,000 registrants since its launch in 2019. The Gallery's newest online learning resource for K-12 educators, "Uncovering America", featured works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. New virtual family workshops were developed that encourage interactivity and movement, along with art making and "movie nights" with free access to streaming children's films. Since March, thousands of adults experienced art with others via virtual programs, such as virtual art making and discussion-based workshops, including an online version of the "Just Us" program for people with memory loss and their care partners. Virtual lectures and symposia were offered, including a tribute to David C. Driskell, one of the world's leading authorities on African American art, who passed away at age eighty-eight from complications of COVID-19 on April 1. The Gallery offered paid internships during the fiscal year, including the "Museum Assistants" program, in partnership with DC's Summer Youth Employment Program. This program continued in a virtual iteration to support aspiring museum professionals.The Gallery's Digital Experience division was essential in the Gallery's shift to an all-digital offering after the Gallery's closure, and launched a series of new initiatives including designing 360-degree virtual tours of exhibitions and launching a new Gallery blog. The division pivoted to producing live-streamed events with new virtual conference technologies, and deployed studio-quality capture kits to video-record remote artists and presenters for digital content and virtual programs. Virtual programming included lectures, artist conversations and presentations by Gallery curators, aimed at provided engaging content across the Gallery's digital channels, both internal and external. The fiscal year saw an increase of thirty-eight percent in users of the Gallery's website, reaching five million viewers for the first time. The Gallery's imaging and visual services department continued to document the Gallery's collection, creating master images for 1,228 collection objects and 176 non-collection objects, as well as documenting 110 object conservation treatments. Some 56,000 new digital assets were added to the enterprise digital asset management system, bringing the total number of managed assets to 663,000. The Gallery's music department organized and presented more than thirty concerts during the year through March 8, 2020, including the weekly Sunday afternoon concerts and several midweek concerts, taking places in various locations throughout the Gallery. More than 12,000 visitors attended these concerts. In the summer months of fiscal year 2020, five concert recordings from the music department's 2018-2019 season were featured on WETA's Monday evening program "Front Row Washington."During the first two months of the fiscal year, the Gallery's film department organized and presented twenty-eight discrete events, including two major retrospectives presented off-site - a contemporary African series held in the Embassy of France theater and an Armenian retrospective presented at the Freer Gallery of Art. Starting in May 2020, the film department created an all-virtual film series and, for the remainder of the fiscal year, presented 130 films organized into topics of contemporary interest such as a focus on the work of Black, female, and Indigenous artist filmmakers.The Gallery's library acquired sixty-three titles for the rare book collection during the fiscal year, including a copy of Thomas Ochsenbrunner's 1494 guide to Rome, and a book published for the funeral of Elizabeth Farnese published in Mexico in 1767. The library's image collections were augmented with 113 artists' portraits from the Paul Hertzmann and Susan Herzig Collection, and a large collection of photographs, manuscripts, and ephemera of Dr. George Martin Richter.The Gallery's library added 5,481 books, 553 auction catalogs, and 15,096 images to its holdings during the year. The reader services department answered 2,833 inquiries, welcomed 178 new readers among 561 visitors before the pandemic closure, created 46,825 scans from its collections, and recorded 61,512 unique visits to the library's web pages. The department loaned 1,318 titles to universities and public libraries in forty-six states and seventeen countries and offered virtual programs on conducting provenance research and using the library's digital resources.The Gallery's publishing office produced seven book-length publications during the fiscal year, including four exhibition catalogs, two CASVA volumes, and a volume of illustrations. The exhibition catalog "The Life of Animals in Japanese Art" won an award for excellence in design and production from the Association of University Presses. The Gallery's Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts, founded in 1979, continued its support and enhancement of scholarship in art and architecture through fellowships, research, scholarly meetings, and publications. Now in its fortieth academic year, the Center welcomed scholars from Canada, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The topics of their research ranged from the response to industrially produced metals in mid-nineteenth-century France to the sensory perceptions among the Yoruba people.

Expenses
$45,287,671
Revenue
$1,409,356

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONSAn integral aspect of the Gallery's programming is organizing and presenting special exhibitions of major works of art lent from public and private collections around the world, highlighting the breadth of artistic achievement in all forms. Through collaborative relationships with other nations and museums, special exhibitions bring together great works of art and contribute to scholarship in the field. The Gallery presented nine exhibitions during the fiscal year. Four exhibitions continued from the previous fiscal year: "By the Light of the Silvery Moon: A Century of Lunar Photographs", "The Eye of the Sun: Nineteenth-Century Photographs from the National Gallery of Art", "Verrocchio: Sculptor and Painter of Renaissance Florence", and "The Touch of Color: Pastels at the National Gallery of Art". The following exhibitions opened during the Gallery's fiscal year 2020."Alonso Berruguete: First Sculptor of Renaissance Spain" was the first exhibition devoted to the artist outside his hometown of Valladolid, Spain. Organized by the National Gallery of Art and the Meadows Museum in Dallas, with the special cooperation of the Museo Nacional de Escultura in Valladolid, the exhibition presented approximately forty-five paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. Paintings and sculptures from his most ambitious retablo, which decorated the high altar of the church of San Benito el Real in Valladolid, formed the centerpiece. A short film and fully illustrated catalog accompanied the exhibition."Richard Mosse: Incoming" presented viewers with an immersive three-channel video of the sights and sounds of a pressing issue of our time: mass migration. Seeking a new way to shed light on the refugee crisis and "the urgent narratives of human displacement", Mosse and cinematographer Trevor Tweeten captured fragments of events along two major pathways leading into Europe - one from Africa, the other from the Middle East - using a highly specialized surveillance camera. The video vacillates between scenes of the profoundly beautiful and meditative to the terrifying and horrific. The video was projected on three large screens at least nine and one-quarter feet high by sixteen and one-half feet long and was accompanied by a score composed by Ben Frost. For the past several decades, scholars of European landscape painting have turned their attention to the large extant body of oil sketches made outdoors by artists in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The tradition of painting "en plein air" as a tenet of art education was centered in Rome, where artists from around Europe gathered to study ancient sculpture and architecture, as well as masterpieces from the Renaissance and baroque. "Painting from Nature: European Landscape Sketches, 1770-1870" presented more than one hundred of these sketches from four major collections - the National Gallery of Art, Washington; the Fondation Custodia, Paris; the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; and a preeminent private collection. The accompanying catalog addressed issues of attribution, chronology, national school, and the site circuit that informally structured the practice.To mark the 500th anniversary of Raphael's death, the Gallery presented "Raphael and His Circle", comprised of two dozen prints and drawings from the Gallery's collection, in an intimate installation. These works illustrated how Raphael's art shaped the standard of aesthetic excellence for later artists, connoisseurs, and scholars. The exhibition included four drawings by Raphael and nine drawings by Raphael's closest collaborators and most brilliant followers - Giulio Romano, Polidoro da Caravaggio, and Perino del Vaga. The exhibition also presented ten of the most celebrated engravings, as well as a chiaroscuro woodcut, by the earliest and finest interpreters of Raphael's designs.Edgar Degas is best known today as the painter of dancers, a subject that dominated his art for nearly four decades. His interest, however, was not limited to the dancers themselves but rather encompassed the entirety of the Paris Opera. "Degas at the Opera" celebrated the 350th anniversary of the founding of the Paris Opera. The exhibition brought together approximately one hundred of the artist's most extraordinary works from private and public collections across the United States, Europe, and Japan, representing Degas's remarkable range of media that encompasses paintings, pastels, drawings, prints, and sculpture.During the fiscal year, 233 lenders from thirteen countries and twenty-seven states loaned 547 works of art to ten exhibitions (four special loan exhibitions and six in-house exhibitions). The Gallery also worked on twenty-four additional projects scheduled to open in the next five years and administered the tours of three exhibitions.

Expenses
$22,391,106
Revenue
$16,832

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National Gallery of Art
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