National Congress of American Indians Fund

WASHINGTON, DC   |  www.ncai.org

Mission

Founded in 1944, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) is the oldest, largest, and most representative American Indian and Alaska Native organization serving the broad interests of tribal governments and communities. NCAI, a non-profit organization, advocates for a bright future for generations to come by taking the lead to gain consensus on a constructive and promising vision for Indian Country. The organization’s policy issues and initiatives are driven by the consensus of our diverse membership, which consists of American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments, tribal citizens, individuals, and Native and non-Native organizations. For nearly seven decades since its founding, NCAI has remained true to the original purpose of the organization: to be the unified voice of tribal nations. As outlined in the NCAI Constitution, our purpose is to serve as a forum for unified policy development among tribal governments in order to: (1) protect and advance tribal governance and treaty rights; (2) promote the economic development and health and welfare in Indian and Alaska Native communities; and (3) educate the public toward a better understanding of Indian and Alaska Native tribes.

Ruling year info

1960

Principal Officer

Mrs. Jacqueline Pata

Main address

1516 P STREET

WASHINGTON, DC 20005 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

53-6017907

NTEE code info

Minority Rights (R22)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Native Vote

NCAI has been protecting the right to vote for Native Americans since the day the organization was founded in 1944. Some of the first resolutions ever passed by NCAI supported voting rights for American Indians in New Mexico and Arizona. Today, NCAI's national nonpartisan initiative - Native Vote - partners with Native Vote coordinators throughout the country to revitalize civic engagement in Indian Country. Tribes are America's first governments and Native Vote works to ensure all Native citizens participate in shaping the future of their communities. Native Vote also encourages American Indians and Alaska Natives to exercise their right to vote and works to protect voting rights across the country. At NativeVote.org individuals can join the national campaign and get involved in the voter engagement efforts in their local communities. The areas of focus for the Native Vote campaign are: - Get-Out-The-Vote (GOTV) and registration efforts, - Election and voter protection awareness and advocacy - Voter and candidate education - Tribal access to data

Population(s) Served

Planned as a long-term commitment by NCAI, with generous support by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Partnership for Tribal Governance (PTG), officially launched in 2009, seeks to increase, organize, enhance, and make accessible the resources necessary to support tribes’ efforts to strengthen their governance. Through partnerships with tribes, tribal intergovernmental and national Native organizations, academic and policy centers, practitioners, policymakers, and other resources, the PTG will: - make investments in self-determined tribal efforts to strengthen governance, - support increased education, training, and technical assistance for tribes, - enhance communication, coordination, and collaboration among groups working to support tribes’ efforts, - support the development and sharing of new knowledge, - develop and promote a policy research agenda to strengthen tribal governance, - advocate policies to enhance and strengthen tribal governments, - encourage increased public and media education about tribal governments, and - support the internal capacity-building of NCAI as an institution.

Population(s) Served

NCAI leadership launched the Policy Research Center (PRC) in 2003 to serve as a think tank focused on issues facing tribal communities. Guided by a diverse and distinguished advisory council, the PRC works with our partners to provide the tools necessary to inform public policy debates with meaningful information. Our work is focused on shifting the discourse in Native policy from a problem-focused approach to truly proactive, future-thinking strategy development. The mission of the PRC is to: Provide tribal leaders with the best available knowledge to make strategically proactive policy decisions in a framework of Native wisdom that positively impact the future of Native peoples. The vision is: Supporting Indian Country in shaping its own future.

Population(s) Served

In response to disastrous court opinions and legislative attacks on the status of tribal governments, tribal leaders formed the Tribal Sovereignty Protection Initiative (TSPI) in September, 2001. Tribal leaders structured the TSPI as four separate components: the Legislative Committee, the Tribal Supreme Court Project, the Federal Judicial Selection Project, and the Education and Public Outreach Committee—all working together toward the common goal of protecting tribal sovereignty. Under this framework, tribal leaders, attorneys, and other experts have coordinated and developed an array of educational, legal, political, and grassroots strategies. A key component of the TSPI on which NCAI continues to work daily is the Tribal Supreme Court Project. The Tribal Supreme Court Project—a collaboration between NCAI and the Native American Rights Fund— monitors litigation in which Native people have a significant stake and coordinates strategy among a network of over 250 tribal leaders, attorneys, and law professors. That strategy includes the preparation and submission, where appropriate, of amicus briefs on behalf of tribes or tribal organizations. Efforts like these have succeeded in slowing and, in some instances, reversing the detrimental impacts of federal court decisions. Protection of tribal sovereignty in US courts is fundamental to the continued existence of tribes as distinct peoples and cultures. NCAI is dedicated to protecting tribal sovereignty and treaty rights through the courts.

Population(s) Served

The Native Financial Education Initiative provides information for tribes and their citizens to enhance financial capabilities in Indian Country. This initiative includes the work of the Native Financial Education Coalition, focus on Financial Literacy Month, and NCAI's participation in the Protect Native Money Campaign and Tribal Exchange Stock Market Game.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add geographic service areas to create a map on your profile.

Login and update

Affiliations & memberships

Combined Federal Campaign 2014

Combined Federal Campaign 2013

Combined Federal Campaign 2012

Combined Federal Campaign 2011

Financials

National Congress of American Indians Fund
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

National Congress of American Indians Fund

Board of directors
as of 06/05/2016
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Brian Cladosoosby

National Congress of American Indians

Term: 2013 - 2015

Brian Cladoosby

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

Robert Sheppard

Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate

Dennis Welsh

Colorado River Indian Tribes

Jacqueline Pata

National Congress of American Indians

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes