Virginia Home for Boys and Girls

aka VHBG   |   Henrico, VA   |  www.vhbg.org

Mission

Virginia Home for Boys and Girls’ mission is to help youth across Virginia with emotional and behavioral health concerns by facilitating the healing process using a relationship-based, cognitive-behavioral approach. Since 1846, when we were founded as the Richmond Male Orphan Society, VHBG has provided enduring care, stability, and support to generations of Virginia’s children who have experienced neglect, haven’t had their basic needs met, and/or have needed loving, caring adults in their lives. While we began as an orphanage, we are now a comprehensive child and family services organization. We offer three core program areas: 1) group care services for youth ages 11-17 and an independent living arrangement for youth ages 17-21; 2) specialized K-12 education in our John G. Wood School; and 3) therapeutic resources. We believe adolescents belong in nurturing environments and life-long relationships that have a strong commitment to teaching skills that help preserve, maintain, and reunify the “family” unit. We include extra support systems around direct care staff such as extensive training, on-the-job coaching, and eyes-on evaluation. These supports contribute to the longevity and professionalism of those working directly with the youth which leads to a higher quality of care and better outcomes. We ensure that every youth in our care receives a unique experience that is tailored to meet their needs with the ultimate goal for each youth to be on their way to a successful life.

Ruling year info

1942

President and CEO

Ms. Claiborne M. Warner

Main address

8716 W. Broad Street

Henrico, VA 23294 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Virginia Home for Boys

EIN

54-0506330

NTEE code info

Family Services (P40)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Group Home (Long Term (P73)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Children who have experienced adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are at-risk for emotional and behavioral health disorders. Research on children’s brains found that toxic stress physically damages a child’s developing brain. When children are overloaded with stress hormones, they’re in flight, fright, or freeze mode. They can’t learn in school. They often have difficulty trusting adults or developing healthy relationships with peers. These children are often unable to be successful at home, in school, or not ready for a foster home. They are children who have had a very painful childhood and need to learn to heal from their trauma before they can have hope for the future

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Group Care Services

When it is necessary to remove a child from their home, studies show children need a strong family environment and lasting adult relationships in order to succeed. In 2012, 6116 children in Virginia were found to be victims of abuse and/or neglect (VA DSS, 2012 Child Protective Services Report). When a child is found in this situation, there is a great need to provide a transitional place where the child can heal and grow. Studies show that adverse childhood experiences like abuse, neglect, family substance abuse, and family violence during childhood lead to emotional challenges for children and young adults, including depression, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (Gratz, 2003 via VA Comm. on Youth, Evidence-Based Practices for Children with Mental Health Treatment Needs, 2013). VHBG has a long-standing proven impact with youth who need a transitional, longer-term home in our Group Care Services Program.  Licensed by the Virginia Department of Social Services, our group homes offer youth a stable home and place to grow.

Our group homes include family-style living with individualized, supportive services for boys and girls ages 11-17. Highly-trained Youth Counselors help youth along their healing process with service planning to meet their specific needs. Academic development, behavioral support, therapy, community involvement, recreation, and family integration are paramount. Philanthropic support helps us normalize each youth's life with offsite outings, participation in sports leagues, and other extracurricular activities. The ultimate goal is for each youth to transition on their way to a safe, permanent home.

Population(s) Served
Non-adult children

In the 1970’s, VHBG’s leaders recognized that for some children, a specialized school would be very beneficial, and John G. Wood School (JGW) opened. Today, JGW serves as a K-12 school, helping children with complex emotional, behavioral, and academic challenges. JGW is a fully accredited private day
school for students in grades K-12 and is licensed to serve up to 61 students each year. The school’s programs align with the Teaching-Family Model, Trauma-Informed Care, Aggression Replacement Training, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. JGW’s small classrooms provide a 5:1 or 8:1 student-to-staff ratio – depending on the age and level of need – with additional support from behavioral specialists and a full-time therapist. Students participate in a full academic curriculum to meet Virginia Standards of Learning and graduation requirements. In addition, JGW offers Career and Technical Education class credits including a new Culinary Arts program and a school-wide behavioral program that incorporates group counseling, leadership training, and an incentive system to monitor student’s progress and support their social and emotional growth. At JGW, we have many ways to teach our kids these essential skills.JGW’s early-intervention elementary school is the only program in the Richmond metro area that addresses aggression, teaches social skills, and has a primary goal of returning the students back to a public school setting. It serves students who are unable to succeed in traditional public schools because of their need for special education services or individualized instruction. The goal is for the program to support the student to build stronger social-emotional skills, coping skills, and greater impulse control so that they are able to return to a regular classroom.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Health
Family relationships
Social and economic status

VHBG’s Therapeutic Resources department provides individual and family counseling to youth and families from the community as well as out-of-home placements to help facilitate the development of healthy social, emotional, and behavioral functioning. Our licensed and credentialed professionals meet the specific and individual treatment needs of our clients including those who have experienced substantive trauma in their lives. Treatment is strength-based and outcomes-oriented for youth ages 5-21 and adults. Services are strengthened through coordination with our on-campus nursing and psychiatric staff. In addition, VHBG offers a Youth Mental Health First Aid workshop free of charge to the general public. We help youth learn new skills and strategies to manage life’s stresses and challenges by working alongside individuals and their family. We are a safe place for youth to find restoration and hope in their own way, at their own pace. We strengthen families and help families navigate transitions.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
People with psychosocial disabilities
LGBTQ people

Our Independent Living Arrangement is a program for males and females ages 17 - 21 who are aging out of traditional foster care. Knowing that relationships are the first step to overcoming the effects of trauma, each ILA youth works directly with an ILA caseworker who provides support and encouragement. Our ILA caseworkers guide youth on their path to independence through effective relationship building, supervision, coaching, counseling, and service planning. The majority of our youth come to us with little experience managing day-to-day tasks and we teach them how to depend on themselves. We’re an affirming place to live, learn, and work and have experience caring for LGBTQ+ youth. We’re able to designate housing exclusively for LGBTQ+ youth if needed and if available. We’re accepting of youth with multi-cultural backgrounds who speak different languages. We have experience with youth from other countries. We offer independent living skills coaching related to education, employment, transportation, nutrition, money management, self-care, and social relationships. We assist our youth with a wide array of tasks and details of everyday life, from making a doctor’s appointment to opening a bank account to disputing a bill. We teach them how to advocate for themselves. We help our youth graduate from high school and enroll in college. We help them secure short-term jobs and provide long-term career counseling. Most importantly, we give them belief in a bright future. Our townhouse apartments are located on our 30+ acre campus that is centrally located in Henrico, Virginia just minutes from downtown Richmond. With close proximity to colleges, employment, health care, shopping, and entertainment, the area offers public transportation and a walkable or bikeable commute to jobs. Highlights of the program:
assistance with rent, food allowance, and utilities; case management; assessment of independent living skills (using the Casey Assessment) and necessary training/coaching with the Casey curriculum according to service plan in these areas, as needed; and support with day-to-day living as needed.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Ethnic and racial groups
Family relationships
Social and economic status
Sexual identity

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Client Discharges: Clients passing core classes: Serious incidents of clients: Therapeutic Holds: Progress toward treatment goals: Post-Discharge Success Rate of Clients: Practitioner Evaluation

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Group Care Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Progress toward treatment goals: With careful service planning and use of interventions. Our Program Outcomes Report indicates that goals progress or attainment occurred at a rate of 97% in FY2020!

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Goal 1: Group Care Services VHBG uses the highly successful evidence-based Teaching-Family Model of care. Trained Youth Counselors use this model with a goal to help children transition to foster care, adoption, or back to their biological family.
Goal 2: Our Independent Living Arrangement program goal is to ensure that youth attain or make progress towards attaining independent living goals, are satisfied with services received, and successfully transition into independent living as young adults.
Goal 3: Our goal in Therapeutic Resouces is to ensure clients attain or make progress toward individualized goals and clients are satisfied with the services provided. We aim to restore hope through teaching and healing, to ensure children and their families thrive.
Goal 4: Our JGW School's goal is to help students to return to public school, graduate, provide the services required within the IEP; and provide counseling as needed.

Strategy for Goal 1: A team of caring Youth Counselors guides and engages youth through their daily activities and uses an approach of Positive Behavioral Support. This approach is more interested in the “why” behind the behavior in order to better understand the underlying need of the youth and overcome maladaptive ways of meeting those needs. Through the establishment of safe, therapeutic relationships, practitioners implementing the Teaching-Family Model seek to instill core values that speak to the healthy individual, healthy relationships, and the incorporation into the surrounding community.
Strategy for Goal 2: ILA services include personal development skills such as communication, decision-making, conflict resolution, and independent living skills such as career exploration, job skills, money management, housing, and transportation.
Strategy for Goal 3: We provide individual and family counseling supported by our on-campus nursing and psychiatric care.
Strategy for Goal 4: Our JGW program is based on the philosophy that adolescents with a history of school problems related to emotional struggles, and/or specific learning disabilities, can best succeed in a school environment where there is a concern for the total individual. Our positive behavioral ideology, educational philosophy as well as the structured implementation of principles of the Teaching-Family models are consistent with the values John G. Wood School embodies.

Virginia Home for Boys and Girls uses a trauma-informed approach in alignment with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s concept of a trauma-informed organization. For more than 20 years, SAMHSA has been a leader in recognizing the need for trauma-informed systems of care. This framework follows four key assumptions in providing trauma-informed care: realization, recognition, response, and resisting re-traumatization.

VHBG trains our employees to realize the widespread impact of trauma (including facts about Adverse Childhood Experiences, which are pervasive in our clients, and the impact of trauma on brain development and behavior) and understand potential paths for recovery such as the importance of relationships, voice and choice, empowerment, learning self-regulation, and learning skills of competency.

We recognize the signs and symptoms of trauma in clients, families, staff, and others involved in the system. We ask, “what happened to this person?” and “what underlying need is this person trying to meet with this behavior?” instead of “what’s wrong with this person?”

We respond by fully integrating knowledge about trauma into policies, procedures, and trained practices. In interactions with clients, we focus on safety, relationship building, the professionalism of our staff, the teaching of social and emotional skills in collaborative ways, shared decision making, and individualized care. We meet routinely as teams in order to share observations, celebrate successes, and plan interventions. We protect staff members from vicarious trauma by restricting their workload and work hours, and by meeting routinely with them one-on-one for supportive supervision and conceptual development. We conduct objective evaluations of staff practices and implementation of training, including interviewing clients regarding their satisfaction with how they are treated and the safety of those around them.

We seek to actively resist re-traumatization, especially during crisis intervention. We focus on empathy, praise, and connecting with the emotional brain so as to help clients regulate their own behavior. And finally, we use least-restrictive restraints only as a last resort when safety is at stake.

.1. Client Discharges: Our goal is to discharge at least 80% of our clients to a less restrictive environment.
2. Clients passing core classes: The goal is for 80% f clients to be passing core classes. In FY2020
(academic year 2019/2020), 70.5% of clients were passing core classes. 3. Serious incidents of clients: VHBG aims for a decline in frequency of serious incidents for individual youth. The frequency of serious incidents declined for 93% of youth in past 6 months. 4. Therapeutic Holds are Safe for All Involved: Our goal is that zero injuries occur for staff or clients during the use of therapeutic holds. 5. Progress toward treatment goals: With careful service planning and use of interventions we believe a 90% rate of goal progress or attainment is achievable. Our Program Outcomes Report indicates that goals progress or attainment occurred at a rate of 97% in FY2020! 6. Post-Discharge Success Rate of Clients: 55.5% (5 out of 9) of these clients were successful as easured by stability of placement, grades, and employment. Our goal is 80%. 7. Practitioner Evaluation Trends: Our model of care involves a comprehensive evaluation process that includes youth surveys and an eyes-on evaluation of the practitioner’s implementation of trained competencies. The process is intended to be a learning process that enables trainers and supervisors to support practitioners with fidelity to our model of care. VHBG’s current goal is that at least 80% certified on their first visit (follow-up visits to address areas of drift are common) and 100% certified by their second visit. We exceeded our goal with a 83% rate of certification in FY2020 and second visits resulting in 100% certified.

Financials

Virginia Home for Boys and Girls
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Virginia Home for Boys and Girls

Board of directors
as of 7/28/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

John Barnes

Virginia Beach Express

Term: 2020 - 2021


Board co-chair

Billy Harper

Sun Trust

Term: 2020 - 2021

Mary Scott

The Bergman Group

J. Mansfield

Amazon

John Barnes

SRBC Capital Markets

Richard Bland

Bland & Sorkin, P.C.

James Baldwin

CBRE Richmond

Shannon Best

University or Richmond

Katie Harlow

Captial One

Billy Harper

Sun Trust

Scot Hathaway

Dominion Power

Alan Hess

Wells Fargo Financial Advisors

Thomas Mountcastle

CSC Leasing Company

Sakina Paige

Captial One

Sarah Vogt

Community Volunteer

Russell Wyatt

Commonwealth Commercial Partners

Shannon Taylor

County of Henrico

Mary Gordon

Altria

Jessica Dyer

Community Volunteer

Alexander Eccard

Yount, Hyde and Barbour

Nikki Powell

Community Volunteer

Katherine Busser

Retired

Robert Calhoun

VCU

Aurelia Lewis

Lewis Media Partners

Elizabeth Montgomery

Community Volunteer

Robert Greenland

Greenland & Associates

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 07/28/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data