PLATINUM2024

Junior Achievement of Central Virginia

Boundless Possibilities

Richmond, VA   |  https://centralva.ja.org/

Mission

Junior Achievement (JA) inspires and prepares young people to succeed in a global economy.    Our vision is to be the essential partner in relationships between the educators, business leaders and community partners of Central Virginia for the benefit of all our youth. 

Ruling year info

1994

President & CEO

Jennifer Boyle

Main address

1801 Libbie Avenue, Suite 203

Richmond, VA 23226 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-0803325

NTEE code info

Business, Youth Development (O53)

Elementary, Secondary Ed (B20)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2023, 2022 and 2021.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Lack Of Financial Literacy Personal finance is not mandatory or even offered in some traditional education systems; therefore, young people need the tools to make sound financial decisions once they enter the workforce. Student Disengagement The dropout crisis in America’s educational system has a devastating impact on the future health of the economy. Nearly every year, only 70 percent of students complete high school on time and earn a diploma. Skills Gap Graduating students are inadequately prepared to participate in a meaningful way to their community’s success because they lack basic skills such as communication, problem-solving and critical thinking.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

JA Elementary School Programs

JA elementary school programs are the foundation of
our K-12 curricula. Programs include six sequential themes, each made up of
five hands-on activities that change students’ lives by helping them understand
business, economics, and the working world. The programs expose youth to a
volunteer role model who brings JA programs to life and shows students what’s
possible if they work hard and dream big. All programs align with Virginia
Standards of Learning.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens

JA middle school programs help youth make difficult decisions about how to best prepare for their educational and professional future. The programs supplement standard social studies, English/language arts, and math curricula, and develop financial literacy, 21st century, and entrepreneurial skills that are essential to success in the working world. All programs align with Virginia Standards of Learning.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens

As high school students begin to position themselves for their future, there are many unanswered questions about what lies ahead. Junior Achievement® high school programs help students make informed, intelligent decisions about their future, and foster 21st century skills that will be highly useful as they enter the working world. Volunteer role models show what’s possible if they work hard and dream big, empowering them to unleash their boundless potential. All programs align with Virginia Standards of Learning.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens

JA Finance Park helps high school students build a foundation upon which they can make intelligent financial decisions that last a lifetime, including decisions related to income, expenses, savings, and credit.The JA Finance Park program is composed of 13 required teacher-taught, in-class lessons. It culminates in a hands-on budgeting simulation that is implemented at JA Finance Park located in Libbie Mill Library. Additional extension activities are available for each lesson topic. Both provide educators a method of delivery that will best meet the needs of their students. The JA Career Center is an extension of the JA Finance Park program and will be used in a middle school program beginning in the 2018-19 school year.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Children
Preteens

Where we work

Accreditations

Better Business Bureau of Central VA - Accredited Charity 2017

Charity Navigator 2017

Affiliations & memberships

ConnectRichmond 2009

Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce 2009

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of students who benefit from Junior Achievement of Central Virginia programs.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Number of students educated through field trips

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

JA Finance Park™

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of lessons taught

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Data collected differently in 2023.

Number of students reached.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Junior Achievement has over 100 local JA Areas across the nation, and together we are the nation's largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their futures, and make smart academic and economic choices. JA's programs ignite the spark in young people to experience and realize the opportunities and realities of work and life in the 21st century.
Junior Achievement’s proven lessons in financial literacy, work and career readiness, and entrepreneurship are shown to positively impact the lives of young people. These lessons align with national and state educational standards and are delivered to millions of students across the country with the help of our education partners and volunteers from the local community.

Junior Achievement is known for its lasting impact. That’s because all of our elementary, middle, and high school programs are designed to bring learning to life, reinforce new concepts with hands-on experiences and support the development of core competencies needed for an ever-changing economy. Our programs bridge learning to real-world complexities by driving student engagement and fostering self-motivation.

We present broad career exposure, enabling students to more confidently manage their career aspirations and personal financial futures through practice with specific job functions, career planning and wealth-building.

The value of Junior Achievement’s programs is heightened because volunteers teach them. Volunteers help bring JA lessons to life and strengthen students’ knowledge and skills.

Junior Achievement has over 100 local JA Areas across the nation, and together we are the nation's largest organization dedicated to giving young people the knowledge and skills they need to own their economic success, plan for their futures, and make smart academic and economic choices.

Junior Achievement is one of a few nonprofits to use independent, third-party evaluators to gauge the impact of its programs. Since 1993, independent evaluators have conducted studies on Junior Achievement's effectiveness. Findings prove that Junior Achievement has a positive impact in a number of critical areas. We invite you to read the Programs Evaluation Results.

Financials

Junior Achievement of Central Virginia
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Junior Achievement of Central Virginia

Board of directors
as of 01/18/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Andrew Miller

Workshop Digital

Term: 2023 - 2025

Amy Miller

VACO Richmond, LLC

Annie Cai Larson

Dominion Energy

Joanna Bergerson

Karen Kinslow

Dominion Energy

Ron Carey

Tilt Creative + Production

Anitra Cassas

Brian Combs

SouthState Bank

Amanda Kish

PwC

Kay Gotshall

Keiter

Lee Hannah

Cigna Healthcare - Virginia

Kyle Harkrader

EY

Michael Mueller

Williams Mullen

Quincy Gregory

Truist

Will Hershey

Davenport & Company, LLC

Stephanie Karfias

Mission Lane

Ashley Mann

Haleon

Debbie Lennick

Creative

Andrew Miller

Workshop Digital

Sara Johnson

South State Bank

John Sliman

Deloitte & Touche LLP

Kim Trentham

Altria, retired

Kris Goodwin

Bank of America

Tavis Maxwell

Capital One

Sherri Wyatt

Virginia529 I Ablenow

Jamie Billingsly

BHE GT&S

Katie Laine

Wells Fargo

Liz Davis

Luck Companies

Andy Hicks

KPMG

Drew McNulty

M&T Bank

Allen Bowman

Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond

Alicia Diehl

Allianz

Kassi O'Brien

Scott Insurance

Sally Tate

Hourigan Construction

Julie Conner

Accenture

Lara Nichols

Markel

Mack Frost

Federal Highway Administration

Valerie Heinz

CarMax

Tom Addonizio

University of Richmond

William Clinton

OrthoVirginia

Cherry Dale

Virginia Credit Union

Reuben Essandoh

Capital One

Mark Hilldrup

CapTech

Michele McCauley

Apex Systems/ASGN

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Not applicable
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? No

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 2/16/2023

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 02/04/2022

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We ask team members to identify racial disparities in their programs and / or portfolios.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.