Hope House Foundation

Norfolk, VA   |  www.hope-house.org

Mission

We believe life in neighborhoods and communities is enhanced when people with disabilities are included in all aspects. Our services are based on the conviction that people with disabilities should live in their own homes and have control over their day-to-day lives just as people without disabilities are afforded. We believe that being a part of the community should not be limited by attainment of certain skills. Assisting individuals achieve true citizenship requires us all to make the concepts of freedom and choice a reality; we do this through our services, our participation in our community and within our hearts...each day, every day.

Ruling year info

1967

Principal Officer

Lynne Seagle

Main address

801 Boush St. Suite 302

Norfolk, VA 23510 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-0804383

NTEE code info

Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers (P82)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

While most states long-ago implemented funding models for community-based living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the 2019 pre-eminent report from United Cerebral Palsy ("The Case for Inclusion") ranks Virginia a dismal 38th overall among the states in its allocation of funding for community-based living, and a catastrophic 49th in the category of “reaching those in need.” In human terms, that means that 11,500 languish on waiting lists for community-based services, hundreds of them still in the state-run institutions that the U.S. Department of Justice decried in a 2012 decision. While a settlement between the Commonwealth and the DOJ has resulted in revisions in the Medicaid Waiver funding for community-based services, change has been slow, and this reality remains: Hope House Foundation’s commitment to optimal independence and community participation is not financially supportable through the allotted Medicaid Waiver funding.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Community Support Program

There are the differences between merely living in the community – and having a life in the community. That’s why Hope House created our Community Support Program. It’s designed to increase opportunities for the people we support to take an active role within their communities, and to take existing relationships to deeper, more meaningful levels.

Here’s how it works: each team’s Community Support Coordinator works with the people we support to determine individual goals, needs and preferences. Based on those, the coordinator and the individual work together on a plan to increase participation in events, clubs and the community overall – which includes people with and without disabilities.

Population(s) Served

Many of the people we support had few choices and little privacy or contact with the outside world before arriving at Hope House. They seldom learned how to perform tasks most people take for granted, such as cooking, doing laundry or buying groceries. They were even less likely to learn about the relationship of balanced nutrition and exercise to good health.

When people with developmental disabilities begin living on their own, their lack of knowledge can lead them to a variety of unhealthy behaviors, including smoking, eating foods high in sugar and fat and sedentary lifestyles. These behaviors can lead to obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease.

Since its inception in 1997, the Hope House Foundation Wellness Program has been supported by community grants and outside funding organizations such as the Portsmouth General Hospital Foundation, the Sentara Foundation, the United Way of South Hampton Roads Community Investment Fund, the McGowan Charitable Trust and Susan G. Koman for the Cure.

The Wellness Program includes creative and multi-targeted approaches to accomplish its goals, including:aerobic and stretching classes designed for people with disabilitiestrips to the YMCA for water aerobics and other fitness activitiessupermarket training in which people are educated about choosing healthy foodsindividualized weight-loss planscooking classesbreast healthpedometer walking fit challengeeducation on managing chronic illnessescontests to motivate people

Population(s) Served

The Goal: Enhanced Independence Through Assistive Technology

Among the many goals articulated in recent years by the Hope House Foundation board of directors’ long-range planning white paper was the following: “Adopt and implement cutting-edge technology for more efficient service delivery and quality control,” with a particular emphasis on “assistive technology for those we support.”

The pursuit of this goal is particularly critical and timely:
• The population served by Hope House Foundation is aging, with 53 percent now over 50;
• As documented in the study, Co-morbidities in Developmental Disorders, “Intellectual Disability is associated with multiple co-morbidities spanning multiple domains of physical and mental life and functioning.” This is certainly true of many of the 128 men and women supported by Hope House Foundation:
• 27 percent do not communicate verbally primarily;
• 7 percent have a vision impairment that is not correctible with glasses or contacts;
• 8 percent have a hearing impairment that is not correctible with a hearing aid;
• 34 percent are considered a fall risk;
• 28 percent use a wheelchair either part time or full time.

Hope House Foundation’s assistive technology initiative’s impact goals are two-fold: 1) enhanced independence and safety for the people with intellectual, developmental and, in many cases, physical disabilities served by Hope House; and, 2) a reduction in required staff time resulting in significant savings that ultimately would be billed to the states Medicaid Waiver system – savings that not only allow Hope House Foundation to serve more people, but also result in cost savings to the citizens of the Commonwealth; 3) enhanced leadership by Hope House Foundation to the fledgling assistive technology field both locally and nationally that will allow us to contribute meaningfully to the available body of research.

The vast potential for significant outcomes for impact goals #1 and #2 are best illustrated by a pilot project recently completed on the apartment of Jesse, a then-38-year-old man who, in addition to a primary diagnosis of developmental disability, is unable to use his arms or legs due to a condition called arthrogryposis.

With a relatively small investment of $12,000, a local partner organization completely revamped Jesse’s living room, kitchen, bathroom and closet using Control4 single-home automation system that, paired with interconnectivity from Alexa and Google Home, allows Jesse to change channels, raise and lower volume, change room temperature, control lighting, open and close doors, and unlock and lock the front door.

Population(s) Served

Where we work

Awards

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Improved social and emotional health among people with intellectual disabilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Support Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

95 or 80% of those surveyed developed quality, healthy relationships with peers or other adults supported by Hope House, regardless of their service location.

Increased access to and participation in community resources and supports

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Support Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

92 or 77% of those surveyed participated in any sort of community resource (memberships, hobbies, classes, etc.) either on their own or through a staff referral.

Improved social responsibiilty and leadership among people with intellectual disabilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Support Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

62 or 52% of those surveyed participated in general advocacy activities.

Increased financial stability and self-sufficiency among people with intellectual disabilities

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Community Support Program

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

21 or 18% of those surveyed secured employment in a competitive or assisted situation.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The closing words of the Hope House Foundation mission read as follows: “Choice. Belonging. Home. At Hope House, these are not just abstract concepts. Through our support of people with disabilities, our community participation, and our advocacy, we make these ideas a reality, each and every day.”

That said, a mission statement is only as good as its actualization, and Hope House has lived that mission since its inception in the mid-1980s, when it became one of the first in the country to eschew the concept of group homes, closing all of them by the early 1990s and ensuring that services would be provided in affordable, inclusive settings.
Hope House Foundation’s core program is the provision of comprehensive supports for 128 men and women with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (referred to in this document as “ID”) in their own homes – affordable apartments available for lease to them and to the community at large through our supporting organization (the legal term), The Residential Corporation. As of this writing, 88 persons with ID are served in Norfolk; 23 in Chesapeake; and 17 in Virginia Beach. In addition to ID, those supported endure a higher rate of comorbidity than the population at large.

While the core mission of inclusion has remained constant, its actualization has evolved into a model of innovation. Today, with ten properties owned by The Residential Corporation and offered to approximately 250 members of the community at large at well below the HUD-determined fair-market rent, the men and women supported by Hope House live and thrive in an inclusive environment – rather than the congregate settings that are still the norm in Virginia.

The Hope House model, lauded and emulated throughout the country, has recently been cited by the “National Historical Recognition Project: 2000 – 2020”, which praised Hope House Foundation’s leadership for contributions to the transformation of the disability field over the past 20 years.

At Hope House Foundation, all of our strategies are grounded in our determination to be “of" rather than simply “within" the communities in which we provide services and, through our affiliate organization, affordable housing. That commitment has it roots our radical decision – over 30 years ago – to close our group homes and transition people with disabilities into their own homes.

In closing our group homes, we knew that we were undertaking a mammoth challenge that would require the development of strategies that we knew would be extremely challenging:

a) massive fundraising to compensate for the state's inadequate funding for support services (see item "c" below);

b) partnerships with the business, government and funding communities to secure affordable housing opportunities through our affiliate, the Residential Corporation;

c) strong advocacy to reform the Commonwealth's draconian funding model. While most states long-ago implemented funding models for community-based living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, Virginia ranks a dismal 49th, according to a 2014 United Cerebral Palsy report. That translates into a hall of shame featuring an estimated 8,500 on waiting lists for community-based services; over 600 languishing in state-run institutions; and 1,700 living in state-run hospital settings.

There are several levels of organizational capacity that Hope House Foundation has vigorously pursued:

1. Financial Capacity: At Hope House, we define “financial capacity" as the financial limit of an organization's ability to absorb losses with its own funds or borrowed funds without disruption. One way to discuss this is to examine our “defensive interval ratio." At the end of fiscal year 2016, for example, our defensive interval ratio indicated that we could operate for approximately five months if no additional funds were received. Since the typical goal to which an agency should aspire is three-to-six months, it can be said that Hope House is well within the desired range. This is the result of our vigorous pursuit of fundraising activities, through corporate, foundation, individual and government entities.

2. Advocacy for changes in the Commonwealth's inadequate funding for community-based services: The current funding model in Virginia actually incentivizes congregate settings, in both state-run institutions and group homes. Our advocacy – both organizationally and in our leadership role with the ARC of Virginia – has been instrumental to a determination by the U.S. Department of Justice that the Commonwealth's funding model is in violation of both the ADA and the Supreme Court's 1999 Olmstead decision. Not only has this resulted in a historic 2012 settlement that will ultimately end the institutionalization of people with disabilities, but the Commonwealth's attorneys routinely seek Hope House's counsel as the settlement moves forward. Specifically, the settlement between the Commonwealth of Virginia and the U.S. Department of Justice mandates that the state-run institutions pursue a phased closure that should be complete within ten years.

3. Leadership Capacity: Hope House Foundation is enormously invested in its leadership capacity, at the board, administrative staff and service staff levels. According to Executive Director Lynne Seagle, who has been a respected leader at Hope House for decades, effective leadership requires the following:

• The facilitation of constant, high-level communication with and among the staff – not only regarding the mission itself, but regarding each person's role in bringing those words to life with a sense of empowerment that their decisions will be supported.
• Ongoing communication with all stakeholders and collaborators (funders, government, citizens, non-profit and for-profit partners), making clear the alignment between our mission and the health of the area's communities.
• The ability to galvanize stakeholders in the pursuit of partnership-driven solutions to the unique opportunities and challenges facing Hope House.
• Clear and effective communication with those who may be willing to act as ambassadors of the Hope House mission by joining the fight for improved community-based funding and full inclusion for people with disabilities.

Below are just a few of the outcomes of our strategic approach, expressed, for consistency, in terms of the indicators in the above question:

*Outcome: Improved Social Responsibility and Leadership
Outcome Indicator A: % who participated in general advocacy activities
Achieved outcome: 62 or 52%

Outcome Indicator B: % who participated in government meetings or rallies
Achieved outcome: 14 or 12%

*Outcome: Improved Social and Emotional Health
Outcome Indicator A: % who developed quality, healthy relationships with peers or caring adults not supported by Hope House
Achieved outcome: 62 or 53%

Outcome Indicator B: % who developed quality, healthy relationships with peers or other adults supported by Hope House, regardless of their service location
Achieved outcome: 95 or 80%

Outcome Indicator C: % who developed quality, healthy relationships with more than one friend regardless of service location
Achieved outcome: 74 or 62%

*Outcome: Increased access to and participation in community resources and supports
Outcome Indicator A: % who participated in volunteer activities based on staff referrals
Achieved outcome: 34 or 29%

Outcome Indicator B: % who have a community membership (gym, theater, etc.) based on staff referrals
Achieved outcome: 79 or 66%

Outcome Indicator C: % who participated in any sort of community resource (memberships, hobbies, classes, etc.) either on their own or through a staff referral Achieved outcome: 92 or 77%

Outcome Indicator D: % who participated in any sort of community resource (memberships, hobbies, classes, etc.) on their own – without staff referral
Achieved outcome: 15 (of the 92 who participated in any activity) or 16%

2. Housing Affordability:
Not only do we provide affordable housing for approximately 130 men and women with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities, but we also provide affordable housing for approximately 250 men and women from the community at large in search of affordable housing. All of our units -- secured through our affiliate organization (the Residential Corporation) -- are well below the HUD-determined Fair Market Rate for the Virginia Beach/Norfolk/Newport News metro.

3. Community Support:
One need only review the words of the mayors of the communities in which we operate to gauge the level of community support:

Jerrauld G. Jones, House of Delegates, District 89: "Not only was Hope House the first organization in Virginia to commit to serving people with disabilities exclusively within their own homes, but they have provided leadership locally and nationally to assist others to committing to the concept of inclusivity...."

Stephen Edward Heretick, House of Delegates, District 79: "It is important...to understand that this commitment to community living and community participation for people with disabilities benefits all...."

Financials

Hope House Foundation
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
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Hope House Foundation

Board of directors
as of 10/30/2020
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Janet Davis

Janet Davis Consulting

Term: 2014 - 2023

Matthew Fine

Owner, The Safe Place Mini Storage; Artist

Tom Moss

Group Benefit Agent, HBA Employee Benefit Design Group

Janet Davis

Marketing Director, Kaufman & Canoles

Pam Katrancha

Owner, Garden Gazebo; Franchisee, Hickory Farms

Richard Mapp

Partner & Chairman Employee Benefits Practice Group, Kaufman & Canoles

Joshua Harris

2nd Vice President - Wealth Management, Smith Barney

Anne Standing

Owner, Panache Interriors, Inc.

DiAna White

Vice President, American Funds

Jonathan Gray

Controller, Decisions

Tom McCune

Physician

Whitney Katz

Associate, Booz Allen Hamilton

Dorothy Clark

Community Volunteer

Scott Guirlinger

Manager, Technical Intergraph

Bryan Fowler

Architectural Graphics Volunteer Manager

McCoy Sarah

General Counsel, Port of Virginia

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/30/2020

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data