AHC INC HQ

Developing affordable housing opportunities and helping residents thrive for more than 40 years

Arlington, VA   |  www.ahcinc.org

Mission

Founded in 1975, AHC develops affordable housing and helps communities thrive in the Northern Virginia, Washington DC and Baltimore region. We provide a wide array of educational programs and social services in our community centers to help residents build more stable and successful lives.

Ruling year info

1976

Chair, Board of Directors

David Barsky

CEO

Paul Bernard

Main address

2230 N. Fairfax Drive Suite 100

Arlington, VA 22201 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

Arlington Housing Corporation

EIN

54-1026365

NTEE code info

Other Housing Support Services (L80)

Housing Development, Construction, Management (L20)

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The US is in the midst of an affordable housing crisis. No state has an adequate supply of affordable rental housing for the lowest income renters. And, the COVID global pandemic has exacerbated the problem. Many low-income renters have lost jobs and are struggling to pay rent. A study by the Monroe Group reveals the following: •There isn't a single county in the United States that can fill 100 percent of its low-income population's needs for safe and affordable housing. •More than 11 million Americans pay more than half of their salaries on rent. The number of renters in this category has ballooned by 30 percent over the past five years. •To afford a basic two-bedroom apartment in the U.S., renters need to earn an average of $20.30 per hour. Considering that minimum wage is just $7.25 per hour, a renter would need to work 112 hours per week to afford a modest two-bedroom rental.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Resident Services

For 27 years, AHC has offered affordable housing alongside onsite Resident Services (RS) programming that engages residents and enhances the quality of their lives for a brighter future. Programming has four cornerstones: Education, Health/Wellness, Financial Stability, and Community Building & Engagement. Key programs include:

*After School Program for children grades K-5
*Summer Camp for children and youth grades K-12
*Teen Tutoring for youth grades 6-12
*College & Career Readiness for youth and college freshmen
*Social Services for families in need
*COVID Response and Recovery

2020 has ushered in a new era relative to AHC’s Social Services engagement with the communities it serves. Our residents have suffered high job loss and other hardships due to COVID-19. Through October, our Resident Services team helped over 3,000 households with emergency assistance while continuing the vital education programs that are the key to ultimately lifting families out of poverty. Emergency services have included linkages to rent relief, cash/gift cards, food distribution/delivery, wellness checks, and much more. We have also responded to this year’s social unrest by addressing racial equity openly and directly both as an organization and within our programs.

Over the years, AHC’s comprehensive commitment to “Housing + Education = Success” has helped thousands of residents put down roots and build more stable lives.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people
Children and youth
Ethnic and racial groups
At-risk youth
Seniors

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of housing units built

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number includes total units built, rehabilitated, or acquired since the organization's inception.

Number of people in the area with access to affordable housing as a result of the nonprofit's efforts

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This number represents the total number of people housed at AHC's many properties.

Number of students receiving homework help

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Resident Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total number of students served K-12 with intensive after school programs.

Number of youth who plan to attend post-secondary education

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Resident Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of graduating seniors attending college this fall

Number of children who have emerging literacy skills such as beginning letter recognition and phonological awareness, story comprehension, and use of writing materials.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Resident Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of children in our literacy-based after school program for children in kindergarten through 5th grade.

Number of students receiving personal instruction and feedback about their performance

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Resident Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

All children who participate in AHC's after school programming receive personal instruction and feedback.

Number of evictions prevented through intensive case management.

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

AHC has greatly expanded its case management due to resident need.

Number of volunteers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Resident Services

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Volunteers assist primarily with educational programming, serving as tutors and mentors for children and youth seeking to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty.

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Resident Services

Type of Metric

Context - describing the issue we work on

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Tutoring is intensive in nature. Many tutors choose to follow their student throughout the years and build strong relationships with them that last a lifetime.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

AHC aims to increase the supply of affordable housing in the DC metro area. Currently, we provide over 7,700 units. At the same time, we provide life-changing Resident Services to the people who live in our housing communities so they can increase the quality of their lives.

Ultimately, our goals are as follows:

1. Help alleviate the affordable housing crisis in the DC metro area and Baltimore.

2. Help the children in our programs succeed in school, both academically and socially.

3. Provide resources to adult residents for financial and personal well-being.

AHC takes a holistic approach to affordable housing. Not only do we build new properties, but we also rehabilitate old ones. In addition, we create innovative housing development strategies, manage our properties professionally and provide life-changing programs for residents.

AHC’s thousands of residents reflect the vibrant, diverse population that has shaped the Washington/Baltimore region for decades. All share a common need for an affordable, safe and convenient high-quality place to live.

AHC primarily serves families who earn between 30% and 60% of the Area Median Income. Area Median Income, or AMI, is the middle income in a given area and is the measurement that qualifies families and individuals for affordable housing. In the DC metro area, for example, the 2019 Area Median Income for a family of four is $1,138. That means that households earning 30% of AMI are living on $33,641/year and would pay $819/month in rent .

During our 40 years of experience, we have developed a comprehensive strategy to provide high-quality living environments that help build stable and productive lives for our residents and their communities.

Onsite Resident Services, described above, go beyond offering residents high quality affordable housing to helping them succeed in all aspects of life and break the cycle of poverty.

Affordable Housing

AHC has long been recognized as a key player and proponent of low-income housing in markets where housing is highly competitive and very expensive. At almost 45 years of experience and over 7,700 units, we are well-versed in the many ways of developing quality housing, primarily for low-income individuals.

As a testament to the quality and innovation of our projects, last year, the newly constructed St. James Plaza in Alexandria was named the Best Affordable Housing Development in Virginia at the 2018 Virginia Governor’s Housing Conference. The award was for a housing development that is “innovative in its concept and design and exceptional in meeting the needs of the targeted client population.” Earlier in the fall, the property was awarded the 2018 Excellence in Construction Award by the Metro Washington and Virginia Chapters of Associated Builders and Contractors. The 93-unit complex serves families at 40-60% of Area Median Income and was an innovative partnership with St. James United Methodist Church. The project took five years to complete and cost $32 million. Construction has now started on the adjacent 31 market-rate townhouses that help finance the project.

Resident Services Programming

In addition to activities related to AHC’s primary mission of affordable housing, AHC carries out life-changing Resident Services (RS) that engage residents and enhance the quality of their lives for a brighter future. Intensive Resident Services are focused in Arlington and Baltimore. The program has four cornerstones: Education, Health and Wellness, Financial Stability, and Community Building & Engagement.

Over the years, AHC’s comprehensive commitment to “Housing + Education = Success” has helped countless residents put down roots, build stable lives, and reach their potential. This year, in the face of a global pandemic, AHC mobilized its contingent of Resident Services staff to provide basic needs to families who had last jobs due to COVID. Through October, our multicultural team had reached over 3,000 families in need while still providing the educational programs that are the key to ultimately breaking the cycle of poverty.

Educational programs include:

*After School Program for children grades K-5, with a focus on literacy.
*Summer School for children and youth to help eliminate the “summer slide” in reading and math as well as provide fun and enriching activities during the summer months.
*Teen Tutoring for youth grades 6-12.
*College & Career Readiness targeted primarily to high school juniors and seniors, plus AHC “graduates” needing extra supports while in college.

Our Social Services programs help families become more stable and increase their quality of life through not only stable housing, but better health outcomes, better financial practices, and community-building.

Over the years, AHC has built, acquired or rehabilitated over 7,700 units of housing, most of it affordable to low-income people.

In addition, we have helped thousands of children succeed in school and sent many of them to college.

We have also helped residents in financial crisis stay in their homes (avoid eviction) and put them on the path to better financial footing through financial coaching, connection to benefits, and job coaching.

Finally, we have helped hundreds of seniors age in place, decrease social isolation, and improve their health.

We will continue to do that and more as we look into the future and work with our residents to help determine the programming that is most important to them.

In our four signature educational programs in Arlington, we hope to accomplish the following in the current school year.

Afterschool Program (grades K-5)

Of the 96 participants we serve, 85 will read on grade level or make one year’s worth of expected progress in building literacy skills as evidenced by reading assessments conducted at the beginning of the year and the end of the year.

Summer Camp (grades K-5)

For Summer Camp, students will maintain or improve sight words and math facts as measured by pre- and post-tests of Teacher’s College Sight Words and timed math fact tests. Students will report having supportive adults in the program, being listened to or respected, or having resiliency skills, like an ability to persevere, recognize that any challenge is an opportunity to grow, or have self-confidence and self-esteem. These qualities will be measured by post-tests of the National Out-of-School Time Survey of Youth Outcomes.

TEEN TUTORING PROGRAM (grades 6-12)

Of the 60 regular participants, 55 will achieve both goals set at the beginning of the school year, one academic and one life enrichment. Part of the program’s methodology is to let the teens themselves set their own goals, aided by staff. This ensures goals are appropriate yet challenging. The purpose of the goals is to challenge individual teens at their current level, broaden their horizons, and celebrate their passions and contributions.

COLLEGE & CAREER READINESS (grades 11-12)

As a result of this project, 20 seniors will graduate from high school. Of those, at least 18 will go on to college. In addition, 20 juniors will get intense mentoring and a head start preparing for college. Finally, 10 college freshmen and sophomores will receive supports when needed, such as help with FAFSA and linkages to resources.

All juniors will take the SAT and apply for at least one scholarship, as well as secure a meaningful summer experience before their senior year, including employment, internship, volunteering, or travel.

Other metrics include number of college applications submitted, number of college acceptances, amount of scholarship dollars earned and, for college students, the college persistence rate.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    SMS text surveys, Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes, Community meetings/Town halls, Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    After resident requests for financial assistance skyrocketed in the wake of COVID-19, we expanded our Resident Services footprint into two new jurisdictions and hired new staff to work with residents at properties that had particularly high rates of distress.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive, We tell the people who gave us feedback how we acted on their feedback,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

AHC INC
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

AHC INC

Board of directors
as of 08/03/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

David Barsky

Krooth and Altman

Term: 2019 - 2022

David Barskey

Krooth and Altman

C.C. Jenkins

Retired US Capitol Police Officer

Ginger Brown

Lee Highway Alliance

Tom Klanderman

Venable, LLC

Andargachew Wolde

Self-Employed

Mildred Mack

Retired

Jessica Majano-Arriaza

Crittenden Services of Greater Washington

Justin Oliver

Oliver Properties

Tedi Osias

Montgomery County Council

Wanda Pierce

Pierce Consulting Works, LLC

Terron Sims

Democratic National Committee

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 8/3/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

The organization's co-leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
Black/African American/African
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data