WILDLIFE CENTER OF VIRGINIA

Teaching the world to care for, and care about, wildlife and the environment.

Waynesboro, VA   |  www.wildlifecenter.org

Mission

The Wildlife Center of Virginia, a hospital for native wildlife, teaching the world to care about and to care for wildlife and the environment.

Ruling year info

1983

President

Edward Clark Jr.

Main address

PO Box 1557

Waynesboro, VA 22980 USA

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EIN

54-1215402

NTEE code info

Wildlife Preservation/Protection (D30)

Educational Services and Schools - Other (B90)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

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Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Treatment of Injured and Orphaned Wildlife

The Wildlife Center of Virginia is a wildlife hospital and treats more than 2,500 injured and orphaned wild animals per year from around the Commonwealth of Virginia. The goal is to treat to release so that these animals will be able to survive and thrive in the wild.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Students attending veterinary school, veterinary technical school, and universities around the world join the Wildlife Center of Virginia staff every year to learn about and complete research projects on the threats of native wildlife and how best to treat and rehabilitate injuries.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Wildlife Center of Virginia staff and students utilize our state of the art facility for developing advancements in wildlife medicine and rehabilitation. Ongoing research projects include the experimentation of a new drug to treat mange in wild populations of Black Bear. Utilizing a free online system developed by the Wildlife Center of Virginia, Center staff are able to collect information on wild animals being admitted from countries around the world, including Canada, the United State, South Africa, Estonia, Suriname, and Trinidad and Tobago. This information continues to help us track wildlife health trends.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Since its founding in 1982, part of the Wildlife Center of Virginia's mission has been to teach others wildlife conflict resolutions, proper wildlife intervention and handling, and basic care of injured and orphaned animals. With modern technology, we are able to teach classes around the world through our Wildlife Care Academy. We also host an annual conference.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Outreach Department at the Wildlife Center of Virginia regularly visits and hosts school and educational programs to children and adults around Virginia. They are also able to host programs around the world using Skype and the live Critter Cam feed on our website. This technology allows anyone to tune into our website to observe orphaned Black Bear cubs, young Bald Eagles learning to fly, etc. as they recover and prepare to be returned to the wild. Anyone tuning in also has the ability to ask questions of staff who monitor our moderated discussion.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    The Wildlife Center of Virginia serves a number of core constituencies. Primary among them is the network of wildlife rehabilitators who work with the animals we treat. Rehabilitators nationwide train with us and receive certification credits through our Wildlife Care Academy courses and our annual Call of the Wild conference. We also serve in advisory and support capacity for peer wildlife facilities statewide and across the nation, and in active leadership positions in professional organizations nationwide. We also serve the public who bring animals for treatment and who follow the progress of our animals through treatment and beyond. Finally, we serve the general public (both adults and school children) who participate in our public education programs.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Case management notes, Suggestion box/email,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    Feedback from our engaged public has been a major reinforcer of our organizational culture of openness and transparency about the fate of the wildlife we treat and the challenges they face. We continually hear grateful feedback about the quality of the information we dispense, the follow-up we provide on our patients, and the frank sharing of information about terminal or euthanized patients. That direct feedback has led us to expanded offerings in our online Wildlife Care Academy and annual Call of the Wild Conference focused on the ethics of wildlife care, and on the best practices for wildlife rehabilitators surrounding end-of-life issues for the animals brought in for care.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The Wildlife Center of Virginia’s primary service mission is to treat injured wildlife. In the course of executing that mission we develop partnership, training, education, and support relationships with a number of human constituencies discussed above. In each of those relationships, the feedback we receive shapes our offerings and serves to empower those audiences to be better stewards of wildlife and the environment. For example, the feedback we receive from the individuals who rescue and transport animals feeds directly into our outreach and education work and empowers the public to make better, more appropriate, more informed decisions about wildlife and their local environment.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, Reduced opportunity for direct interaction during COVID,

Financials

WILDLIFE CENTER OF VIRGINIA
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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WILDLIFE CENTER OF VIRGINIA

Board of directors
as of 11/30/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Ms. Cyndi Parry

Erwin Bohmfalk

Purple Foot

Cyndi Perry

Kurt Plowman

Dale Bateman

Linda Roland

Dickson Young, Esq.

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 10/29/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data