Seton Youth Shelters

Changing Lives, Building Futures

aka Seton Youth Shelters   |   Virginia Beach, VA   |  http://setonyouthshelters.org/

Mission

Seton Youth Shelters shall provide a safe haven, counseling and outreach services, 24 hours per day without charge, to assist youth in crisis throughout Hampton Roads, with the goal of reuniting families.

Ruling year info

1984

Principal Officer

Ms. Jennifer Sieracki

Main address

101 N. Lynnhaven Rd. Ste 101

Virginia Beach, VA 23452 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-1250483

NTEE code info

Children's and Youth Services (P30)

Adult, Child Matching Programs (O30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Serving all of Hampton Roads, Seton Youth Shelters provides 24-hour emergency shelter for youth ages 9 up to 18 years old. This program serves runaway and homeless youth and youth in crisis within their family, school and/or community. Seton Youth Shelters operates two gender-specific shelters in Virginia Beach, one for boys and girls. In our shelters, residents are provided youth advocacy and individual/family crisis counseling. Case management activities facilitate coordination of services, community referrals and aftercare follow-up. Youth who enter the shelter program attend local public schools unless parents provide transportation to their home school. Our shelters provide daily psycho-educational groups that address a variety of topics and serve to increase youth awareness of community resources.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Shelters Program

Serving all of Hampton Roads, Seton Youth Shelters provides 24-hour emergency shelter for youth ages 9 up to 18 years old. This program serves runaway/homeless youth and youth in crisis within their family, school and/or community. Seton Youth Shelters operates two shelters in Virginia Beach, one for boys and the other for girls. In our shelters, residents are provided youth advocacy and individual/family crisis counseling. Case management activities facilitate coordination of services, community referrals and aftercare follow-up. Youth who enter the shelter program attend local public schools unless parents provide transportation to their home school. Our shelters provide counseling that address a variety of topics and serve to increase youth awareness of community resources.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Multiracial people

An incarceration affects the entire family. The child may have a hard time adjusting to a change in the family structure or feel uneasy about explaining the situation to well-meaning peers and adults.

The MCP program is FREE and available to youth 4 to 18 years old who have been affected by the incarceration (past or present) of someone in their lives. Each child is paired with an adult who takes on the role of a friend- NOT a substitute parent.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Preteens
Children
Adolescents
Multiracial people

Seton Youth Shelters has operated its Youth Outreach Program since January 1999. It all began with collaboration between Seton Youth Shelters, Stand Up For Kids, and the Virginia Beach United Methodist Church, which continues to this day. Working together, we were able to provide trained professionals and volunteers to open a weekly teen drop-in center named The Crow’s Nest at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront. Since that time Seton Youth Shelters’ Outreach Program has developed a diverse, multi-faceted positive youth development approach to filling the service gap to ensure accessibility of crisis services to the youth of Hampton Roads and their families.

Population(s) Served
At-risk youth
Adolescents
Children
Preteens
Multiracial people

Where we work

Accreditations

United Way 2021

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency 2021

National Safe Place 2021

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of youth who identify, manage, and appropriately express emotions and behaviors

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

Shelters Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Number of children and youth who have received access to stable housing

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

At-risk youth

Related Program

Shelters Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Seton Youth Shelters shall provide a safe haven, counseling and outreach services, 24 hours per day without charge, to assist youth in crisis throughout Hampton Roads, with the goal of reuniting families.

Shelters: Serving all of Hampton Roads, Seton Youth Shelters provides 24-hour emergency shelter for youth ages 9-17 years old. This program serves runaway/homeless youth and youth in crisis within their family, school and/or community. Seton Youth Shelters operates two shelters in Virginia Beach, one for boys and the other for girls. In our shelters, residents are provided youth advocacy and individual/family crisis counseling. Case management activities facilitate coordination of services, community referrals and aftercare follow-up. Youth who enter the shelter program attend local public schools unless parents provide transportation to their home school. Our shelters provide counseling that address a variety of topics and serve to increase youth awareness of community resources.

Youth Outreach: Seton Youth Shelters has operated its Youth Outreach Program since January 1999. It all began with collaboration between Seton Youth Shelters, Stand Up For Kids, and the Virginia Beach United Methodist Church, which continues to this day. Working together, we were able to provide trained professionals and volunteers to open a weekly teen drop-in center named The Crow's Nest at the Virginia Beach Oceanfront. Since that time Seton Youth Shelters' Youth Outreach Program has developed a diverse, multi-faceted positive youth development approach to filling the service gap to ensure accessibility of crisis services to the youth of Hampton Roads and their families.

Mentoring Children of Prisoners (MCP) Program: Making Children a Priority. An incarceration affects the entire family. The child may have a hard time adjusting to a change in the family structure or feel uneasy about explaining the situation to well-meaning peers and adults. The MCP program is FREE and available to youth 4 to 18 years old who have been affected by the incarceration (past or present) of someone in their lives. Each child is paired with an adult who takes on the role of a friend- NOT a substitute parent.

Seton Youth Shelters was established in 1985 as Mother Seton House, Inc., by three local clergy and a few citizens who were concerned about the vulnerability of runaway and homeless girls living on the streets. The agency was named after Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton, the first native-born American to be declared a Saint and a daughter of charity who provided shelter and schooling for orphaned girls and boys.

Initially, girls were sheltered in the homes of host families but soon the number of girls needing assistance grew to the point that St. Nicholas Catholic Church in Virginia Beach's Kings Grant community, stepped forward to provide the use of their rectory to house up to 11. In 1999, St Aidan's Episcopal Church provided a free land lease and a second shelter was opened enabling Seton Youth Shelters to provide shelter, counseling and support for boys in crisis.

Currently each of Seton's shelters provides emergency shelter, counseling and support 24 hours per day without charge to youth ages 9 through 18 who are in crisis.

Soon after the second shelter for boys was opened, street outreach services were launched with a weekly Teen Drop-In Center at the Oceanfront, and mobile Street Outreach vans providing hot food, counseling and education throughout selected neighborhoods on the Southside and the Virginia Peninsula.

In 2006, the Mentoring Children of Prisoners Program was established to provide one-on-one positive role models for children ages 4 to 18. This program compliments the other positive youth development approaches that are core to the shelter and street outreach services. Building upon the potential of each young person, and supporting the development of the skills necessary to become productive and self-sufficient members of their family and our community, is the linking philosophy of all Seton services.

Each year, hundreds of boys and girls, ages 9 up to 18, arrive at our two Virginia Beach residential shelters—often in the middle of the night, sometimes with nothing but the clothes on their backs. Our professional staff welcomes them with food, clothing, school supplies, and the counseling and support necessary for them to either return to their families or continue on to another safe, home environment. Seton's Street Outreach Program vans, operated by our professional counseling teams, drive the neighborhoods of our region, reaching out to thousands of youth on the streets, offering food, hygiene items, counseling, and shelter options—a lifeline for this vulnerable population. Our Mentoring Children of Prisoners program gives children of incarcerated parents the knowledge, skills and confidence they need to reach their full potential.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    We serve youth in crisis in Hampton Roads and beyond.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Case management notes,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    We are constantly adapting using Trauma-Informed Care, and we apply care on a person-to-person level, providing youth with counseling, shelter, and follow-up.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    The people we serve, Our staff, Our board, Our funders, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    The outcome of services impacts the placement of the youth we serve. We place youth in a safe, home environment after they leave our shelters.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    We don't have any major challenges to collecting feedback,

Financials

Seton Youth Shelters
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Seton Youth Shelters

Board of directors
as of 11/18/2021
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Maxine Singleton, Ed. D

Retired Educator


Board co-chair

James White

Safelite Autoglass

Dan Barton, DDS

Beach Dental Center

Becky Rankin

Retired

Linda Spindel

Gerald Travis

Retired

Mandy Yoder

Retired

Patrick Maurer, Esq.

Garriott | Maurer, PLLC

Brian Holland

Atlantic Bay Mortgage

Terri Hoffler

Capital Group

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 06/09/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/11/2020

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We have long-term strategic plans and measurable goals for creating a culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.
Policies and processes
  • We use a vetting process to identify vendors and partners that share our commitment to race equity.
  • We have a promotion process that anticipates and mitigates implicit and explicit biases about people of color serving in leadership positions.
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.