The Society of Saint Andrew, Inc.

Gleaning America's Fields ~ Feeding America's Hungry

aka Society of St. Andrew   |   Big Island, VA   |  www.endhunger.org

Mission

The Society of St. Andrew brings people together to harvest and share healthy food, reduce food waste, and build caring communities by offering nourishment to hungry neighbors.

Ruling year info

1985

Executive Director

Ms. Lynette E Johnson

Main address

3383 Sweet Hollow Road

Big Island, VA 24526 USA

Show more contact info

Formerly known as

The Society of St. Andrew

EIN

54-1285793

NTEE code info

Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash) (P60)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Food Service, Free Food Distribution Programs (K30)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

The Society of St. Andrew (SoSA) addresses two problems: food waste and hunger. At least 40% of the food grown in this country is never eaten; for a variety of reasons, at every step of the food chain fresh, healthy, nourishing food is left behind. Meanwhile, 41 million people in this country are hungry—28 million people don't always have enough to eat and juggle expenses daily to put food on the table. Another 13 million people truly do not know where their next meal is coming from. Hunger and inadequate nutrition perpetuate a cycle that locks millions of people into years or lifetimes of underperformance, stunting, diet-related diseases, and poverty. Fresh produce, left in fields or taken to landfills to rot, emits methane gas—a major contributor to climate change. Moreover, when food is uneaten, all the inputs that went into its production—land, water, seed, labor, equipment, etc.—are wasted as well. A hungry and warming world must do better!

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

The Gleaning Network

Whether harvested mechanically or by hand, millions of tons of produce that does not meet top market specifications are left behind in the fields during harvest. SoSA coordinates with hundreds of farmers across the country who generously donate their leftover crops to feed the hungry. We then coordinate and supervise field gleaning events where our tens of thousands of volunteers simply pick-up the good crops left behind. Each year, about 3,000 gleaning events are conducted that result in millions of pounds of nutritious produce being saved and distributed to the hungry. SoSA volunteers then take this fresh produce directly to hundreds of feeding agencies and programs right in the local area where the gleaning is conducted. SoSA provides all the coordination and supervision among farmers, volunteers, transportation, and vital feeding programs that receive the food at no cost. Those receiving this nutritious food include: Food Banks (large and small), soup kitchens, homeless shelters, AIDS hospice homes, Salvation Army feeding programs, Senior feeding centers, and a host of other essential feeding programs in local areas. All are in desperate need of the fresh produce that this program provides in order to meet the nutritional need of those they serve.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

After being harvested, fresh produce is sent to a packing facility where it undergoes another "grade out" process before it is packaged for final shipping. SoSA intercepts as much of this food as possible and ships truckloads of this perfectly good, but rejected, produce to all 48 contiguous states. The produce is donated at no cost, but SoSA must pay the packing and freight cost associated with shipping it to feeding agencies across the country. Each truckload saved is about 45,000 pounds of produce resulting in over 135,000 nutritious servings.

The Seed Project strategically extends SoSA’s historical Seed Potato Project, which for more than 30 years has provided seed potatoes to Appalachian farmers each spring. The Seed Project distributes garden vegetable seeds to Appalachian farmers and to congregation and agency partners in food deserts, rural areas, community gardens, inner-city gardens, edible church gardens, and schools.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged people

Harvest of Hope is a retreat-based program that engages individuals (primarily young people) in gleaning to feed hungry neighbors, and then in study and reflection about causes and solutions to the issues of hunger and food waste in this country. Harvest of Hope encourages participants to make lifelong commitments to engaging in acts of voluntarism that meet short-term hunger needs and in acts of advocacy that address long-term hunger needs.

Population(s) Served
Adolescents
Economically disadvantaged people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of tons of food kept out of landfills

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

The Gleaning Network

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Every ton of food kept out of landfills reduces harmful methane gas emissions by the equivalent of keeping 2.236 cars off the road for a year.

Number of servings of fresh fruits and vegetables shared with hungry people in the US

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

The Gleaning Network

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

All of this food is perfectly fresh, tasty, nutritious, and safe to eat. It is simply excess or unmarketable. Quantity variations year to year are often the result of severe weather destroying crops.

Number of volunteers engaged in simple, hands-on service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Volunteers come from all ages and all walks of life. It's not uncommon for a banker to be gleaning side by side with a homeless person, or a senior to glean beside a parent and her young children.

Number of produce providers

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Other - describing something else

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Providers share their excess & unmarketable produce in the way it's most convenient for them, whether that's inviting gleaners into their fields or calling when they have a truckload for us to pickup

Number of agencies receiving food to share with clients/guests

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Agencies "on the ground" in locales across the country receive this good food to share with their clients. Because they receive it at no cost, this frees agency budgets for other critical client needs

Hours of volunteer service

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the total number of hours contributed by volunteers in service to the mission to harvest and share healthy food.

Pounds of Farmers to Families Food Boxes Distributed

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Type of Metric

Input - describing resources we use

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

This is the total number of pounds of Farmers to Families Food Boxes distributed through SoSA's Network as a part of the special USDA program.

Number of seed packets distributed to partner agencies

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Economically disadvantaged people

Related Program

The Seed Project

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Increasing

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

A. Reducing food waste by keeping fresh, but commercially unmarketable fruits and vegetables out of landfills.
B. Ending hunger by meeting the short-term nutritional needs of our country's most vulnerable residents, providing fresh, healthy fruits and vegetables to supplement their diets, at no cost.
C. Engaging volunteers from all walks of life in simple, hands-on service that both reduces food waste and feeds hungry people
D. Empowering concerned individuals and faith communities to act and advocate for long-term, sustainable solutions to the entrenched environmental problem of food waste and the entrenched socio-political problem of hunger in this country.

A. Reducing food waste by keeping fresh, but commercially unmarketable fruits and vegetables out of landfills.
1. Building relationships with farmers, growers, packing houses, and trucking companies, by
2. Introducing the Society of St. Andrew and its work, and encouraging and/or incentivizing produce providers to work with the Society of St. Andrew to keep food they have grown or transported from going to waste by allowing diversion at the point where waste would occur.
B. Ending hunger by meeting the short-term nutritional needs of our country's most vulnerable residents, providing fresh, healthy fruits and vegetables to supplement their diets, at no cost.
1. Charting a nation-wide network of receiving agencies (soup kitchens, shelters, small local food pantries, large regional food banks, senior and child nutrition programs, emergency and disaster relief programs, etc.) to share or prepare and serve this good food with their clients/guests.
2. Developing a safe, simple, scalable, efficient, cost-effective, timely, replicable, and flexible process for getting food from the point of acquisition to the point of distribution that does not place undue burdens on either the produce donor or the produce recipient.
C. Engaging volunteers from all walks of life in simple, hands-on service that both reduces food waste and feeds hungry people
1. Establishing a simple, local, scalable, efficient, cost-effective, timely, replicable, and flexible system for mobilizing, notifying, training, engaging, supervising, and thanking volunteers in locations across the country to glean (pick, dig, or gather) or bag fresh fruits and vegetables at farms, packinghouses, or other point of acquisition near their home.
2. Continually and seasonally re-engaging volunteers in this work, maintaining contact in a way that continues to keep them interested in and energized about the work.
D. Empowering concerned individuals and faith communities to act and advocate for long-term, sustainable solutions to the entrenched environmental problem of food waste and the entrenched socio-political problem of hunger in this country.
1. Creating opportunities for volunteers to have hands-on involvement in reducing food waste and ending hunger through gleaning, correlated with opportunities for study, reflection, and action on root causes and long-term solutions.
2. Systematically connecting volunteers with partner 501(c)(4) organizations focused on advocacy around long-term, sustainable solutions to food waste and hunger.

The Society of St. Andrew (SoSA) has been engaged in all of these tasks for more than 40 years. Recognized as one of the most effective and efficient hunger relief organizations in the country, SoSA has demonstrated the capacity to
• Keep 15,000 or more tons of fresh produce out of landfills each year
• Provide 90-100 million servings of fruits and vegetables to agencies feeding hungry people in 48 states
• Work with 1,000 or more produce providers each year (some of these providers have shared excess and unmarketable produce with SoSA for more than 40 years)
• Engage tens of thousands of volunteers each year in at least 22 states in simple, hands-on service to reduce food waste and feed hungry people
• Offer volunteers opportunities for study, reflection, and action on root causes and long-term solutions to food waste and hunger, 700+ each year through Harvest of Hope mission/work camps and thousands more through the use of print and online resources developed and distributed by SoSA.
• Do all of this at a cost of just under 5¢ per serving of food distributed (2019), by generating funding and support from individuals, faith communities, corporations, and foundations across the United States.

Though we long for, and work day after day, for the time when there will be no hunger in this country, toward the time when no food will be waste, we know that the Society of St. Andrew's work will continue to be necessary and important to meet the short-term needs of millions of people who are struggling to get by.
We know that the fresh fruits and vegetables the Society of St. Andrew provides supply both calories and critical nutrients for hungry people, and we know that providing this good food to low-income individuals at no cost eases the burden of household expenses. It may also lead to better short- and long-term health outcomes, as it improves the quality of nutrition available to them.
We also know, through the work of the National Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the ReFED report, and other recent, well-researched reports, that the volume of food waste in this country is staggering: more than 20 billion pounds of healthy, fresh, edible produce each year is left behind in fields and packing houses, graded out because it isn't pretty enough for grocery store sale, mispackaged, mislabeled, or misdirected in shipping, or even rejected at a distribution center or warehouse. This is food that, without intervention, will simply be left to rot in the field or dumped in a landfill.
We know the food is available, and we know there are hungry people in every part of the United States who would welcome the opportunity to eat it.
The challenges in diverting this food to share with hungry people are logistical and financial. 30+ years of consistent work and proven results demonstrate that the Society of St. Andrew has the knowledge, experience, geographic range, and flexibility to meet nearly every logistical challenge. That our produce recovery and distribution has been limited to 25-35 million pounds of food a year reflects solely financial constraints on our work. Our work is replicable and scalable, with no loss of efficiency. Growing the work depends solely on increasing the financial resources available to the Society of St. Andrew to do this work.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    anecdotal,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve,

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our funders,

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, We don’t have the right technology to collect and aggregate feedback efficiently, The people we serve tell us they find data collection burdensome, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection,

Financials

The Society of Saint Andrew, Inc.
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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The Society of Saint Andrew, Inc.

Board of directors
as of 3/11/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Michael Smith

Retired Businessman

Term: 2021 - 2023

Denise Bates

United Methodist Church

Jean Bernius

Educator

David Bowen

Retired Businessman

Jason Brown

First Fruits Farm, Inspirational Speaker, Former NFL Player

Sheila Carden

Marketing, Southeast Produce Council

Andrew Dillon

Professor, Northwestern University

Heather Gomez

Educator

Karla Gargus

Extension Agent-Horticulture – TSU

Shawn Kiger

United Methodist Church

Andrew Kissell

Retired Engineer, Environmental Compliance Specialist

Steve Moore

Businessman, Food Industry

Paul Perrone

Businessman/Philanthropist

Darrell Smith

International Disaster Specialist; Former Missionary

Robert Spencer

Attorney & Retired Judge

Julie Taylor

Executive Director, National Farm Worker Ministry

Jim Tongue

Retired Pastor

Lillie Wiggins

Human Resources Specialist – Retired

Lauren Lonnes

School Counselor

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 02/03/2021

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data