Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy

Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy

Learn. Pray. Act

aka VICPP   |   Richmond, VA   |  www.virginiainterfaithcenter.org

Mission

The Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy advocates economic and social justice in Virginia’s policies and practices through education, prayer and action.

Notes from the nonprofit

What an exciting period we are in. We have so many opportunities before us and the worst organizational challenges are behind us.

Ruling year info

1986

Executive Director

Ms Kim Bobo

Main address

1716 E. Franklin Street

Richmond, VA 23223 USA

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EIN

54-1362857

Cause area (NTEE code) info

Alliance/Advocacy Organizations (R01)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Virginia's policies and practices are not as inclusive, equitable and welcoming as they should be to create a society in which all can thrive and prosper. The faith community is deeply concerned about economic and racial inequities in the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy (VICPP) is working to advance systemic changes.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Social Justice University

Among the Center's most important ongoing initiatives is our issue education and advocacy training program, Social Justice University (SJU). The program is important in building local relationships with faith communities and advocates. It serves to empower and lift up the voices of Virginia's faith communities to speak up both with and for those who often do not have a voice in the political process. The program focuses on education of the Center's policy priorities and advocacy training to increase the capacity of Virginians to have a voice in the state legislative process.

Population(s) Served
Activists

A joint project of the Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy and the City of Richmond’s Office of Community Wealth Building, his voluntary process is designed to: Recognize employers who are already paying their workers a living wage. Assist consumers in patronizing businesses that provide living wages. Encourage employers who are not currently paying a living wage to adopt the Campaign’s thresholds. Challenge employers who could raise wages and choose not to do so, by publicizing and promoting an ethical alternative to discourage practices that drive down wages and standards.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Unemployed, underemployed, and dislocated people

We are a network of congregations in the Central Virginia region that are providing support and solidarity to neighbors, friends, and family who fear being detained, deported or profiled. Our faith will not allow us to permit the criminalization and scapegoating of immigrants and people of color. In the face of hate and discrimination we are committed to showing love, compassion and hospitality. There are many ways to stand with people who are being targeted.

Population(s) Served
Immigrants, newcomers, refugees

The Living Wage Certification Program is designed to: Recognize employers who are already paying their workers a living wage. Assist consumers in patronizing businesses that provide living wages. Encourage employers who are not currently paying a living wage to adopt the Campaign’s thresholds. Challenge employers who could raise wages and choose not to do so, by publicizing and promoting an ethical alternative to discourage practices that drive down wages and standards.

Population(s) Served
Economically disadvantaged, low-income, and poor people
Unemployed, underemployed, and dislocated people

Where we work

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of Chapters and Affiliate Groups

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

Our regional chapters work at the grassroots level, drawing more voices to the call to advocacy. With support from the Center, chapters organize to meet with legislators in their home districts.

Annual Day for All People Lobby Day Participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

The Day for All People is the annual opportunity for supporters to meet personally with their legislators. In 2018 we had 400 attendees!

Witness at the Capitol Volunteer Participants

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

The Witness at the Capitol team is comprised of volunteers who serve as faithful citizen advocates on the VICPP priority issues during the legislative session.

Number of Contacts in Our Database

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year

Living Wage Certification programs

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Context Notes

Three programs were planned in 2017 and one, Richmond, was launched in May 2018. Another, Alexandria, is preparing for a summer start. The program rewards employers who pay a living wage.

Charting impact

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Five powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

What is the organization aiming to accomplish?

VICPP is an advocacy organization, not a service one. The organization this year had advocated policy positions impacting up to 400,000 persons on Medicaid Expansion and 900,000 on driver's licenses. We have nearly 10,000 names in our database, including hundreds of clergy, and eight chapters/affiliates – with at least two more organizing – relationships with almost all the judicatory leaders in the state, and activists in every state House and Senate district.

The Virginia Interfaith Center has a variety of strategies: 1) create education materials about policies and practices to create a more equitable society; 2) meet with and educate elected leaders about policy priorities; 3) engage our members throughout the state in meeting with their elected leaders on the issue priorities; 4) amplifying faith voices in the public sphere through press conferences, online actions and op-eds pieces; 5) developing local programs, such as Living Wage Certification, for example, to model how communities can better serve the common good.

VICPP has a robust and growing grassroots network of people of faith throughout the Commonwealth. We have local chapters in eight communities, volunteer activist in approximately three-quarters of the districts in the state, and strong ties with almost all of the judicatory leaders in the state.

VICPP is able to measure progress when policies and practices of the state change. Annually we set very clear issue priority goals and are thus clearly able to measure success and progress.

VICPP has been a leader on poverty issues, working on such issues as expanding school breakfast programs, reducing predatory lending, creating a state Earned Income Tax Credit and pushing for Medicaid expansion. The organization is religiously, racially and ethnically diverse. <br/><br/>During the 2017 and 2018 General Assembly sessions, we had several successes. VICPP:<br/><br/>1) stopped the cutting of TANF benefits for low-income families. This was a mean-spirited bill and we stopped it;<br/><br/>2) helped restore driver's licenses to those who owe court fines and fees by leading the advocacy for restoring driver's licenses in both the House and Senate. The bill was signed into law by the Governor;<br/><br/>3) opposed and helped stop several anti-immigrant bills. There were quite a few. Del. Ben Cline's anti-sanctuary bill was narrowly approved by both the House and Senate, but was vetoed by Gov. Northam.<br/><br/>VICPP worked primarily on two bills that were the priority bills for the immigrant community – instate tuition for all students, so that DACA students and others could receive instate tuition, and driver's privilege cards so immigrants can legally drive in Virginia without risking arrest and possible deportation. Neither bill was even given a hearing in the House of Delegates;<br/><br/>4) has long supported increasing the felony threshold from the national low of $200, and the felony threshold was raised to $500, the first change since 1980;<br/><br/>5) sprung into action to oppose a proposal to lift a statewide ban on weapons in worship that passed the Senate. Although scheduled for a House floor vote, the bill was pulled at the last minute and never was rescheduled, so it died in committee; <br/><br/>6) supported a bill to prohibit school districts from shaming children whose parents are behind on paying lunch fees; <br/><br/>7) drafted legislation to strengthen enforcement against wage theft. Both House and Senate bills were killed in committee. VICPP also supported Del. Krizek's bill to create a private cause of action (allow workers to take cases to court), but this bill did not make it out of the House Courts of Justice Committee;<br/><br/>8) continued to advocate for our No. 1 issue, Medicaid expansion, which is still in play. The final version of the state budget needs to include the language to draw down the federal dollars to expand Medicaid eligibility to cover an additional 400,000 working Virginians who are unable to afford health insurance or quality for Medicaid under present rules. The House passed a budget that included Medicaid expansion, passing with 49 Democrats and 19 Republicans supporting it. The Senate is opposed to Medicaid expansion, but is yet to take up the issues as of May 8, 2018. Most expect that this work will likely continue into May or even June.

Financials

Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy

Board of directors
as of 4/29/2019
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Frank McKinney

retired US Navy

Term: 2014 - 2019

Davis Balderston

Community Volunteer

Frank McKinney

Realty Executives, Peninsula

Sarah Cochran

Emerge USA

Alok Srivastava

Community Volunteer

Ali Faruk

Housing Opportunities Made Equal of Virginia

Irvin Varkonyi

Community Volunteer

Jenne' Gilchrist

Community Volunteer

Warren Hottle

Retired

Julie Swanson

Lutheran Family Services of Virginia

Debra Linick

Jewish Community Relations Council

John Copenhaver

retired United Methodist pastor

John Whitley

Unitarian Universialist

Keith Jones

Pastor, Shiloh Baptist Church

Gary Creditor

Retired rabbi

Caroline Black

Episcopal Diocese of Southern Virginia

Paul Falabella

Attorney

Anthony Fludd

St. John’s Church of God in Christ

Scott Christian

retired educator

Aisha Huertas

Episcopal Diocese of Southern Virginia

Matilde Moros

Virginia Commonwealth University

Julio Hernandez

Duke Divinity School

Dean Wanderer

Attorney

Lauren Ramseur

pastor, Bon Air Presbyterian Church

Patricia Shipley

retired United Methodist pastor

Marilyn Blagg

United Methodist Women of Virginia

J. Burke

Baptist General Convention of Virginia

Khalid Matin

VCU Massey Cancer Center

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Keywords

VICPP, Day for All People, Advocacy, Social Justice, Interfaith, Poverty