PLATINUM2022

Virginia Peninsula Foodbank

Inspiring Hope, Feeding Families

aka Foodbank of the Virginia Peninsula   |   Hampton, VA   |  www.HRFoodbank.org

Mission

The mission of the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank is to distribute food effectively through collaborative efforts that minimize hunger, promote nutrition, and encourage self-reliance through education.

Ruling year info

1988

Chief Executive Officer

Karen L. Joyner

Main address

2401 Aluminum Avenue

Hampton, VA 23661 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-1422298

NTEE code info

Single Organization Support (P11)

Food Banks, Food Pantries (K31)

Fund Raising and/or Fund Distribution (T12)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Having enough food to live a normal, healthy lifestyle is a basic human need. Sadly, this is a need that many in the nine cities and counties across the greater Virginia Peninsula have trouble meeting. According to a Map the Meal Gap Survey conducted by Feeding America, 14% percent of Peninsula residents (almost 75,000 people) are classified as food insecure. This means that they do not have the ability to acquire enough food to properly feed themselves and their families. The food insecurity rate on the Peninsula exceeds the statewide average of 11.2 percent and is currently tied for the highest rate in Virginia. Of these nearly 75,000 food insecure individuals, over 18,000 (about 1 in 4) are children.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Kids Cafe

Kids Cafe is a structured after-school program that promotes health, education and safety. It operates as a result of commitments from community collaborations of non-profit organizations, individuals, and the Virginia Peninsula Foodbank. Kids Cafe's provide balanced, nutritious meals to help children at risk help themselves through positive learning experiences to improve their quality of life and their future.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

The BackPack Program was created to break the cycle of hunger and food insecurity for children in low-income communities by providing them with healthy nutritious foods to take home on weekends and extended holidays throughout the year.

Population(s) Served
Children and youth

Our Food Rescues program gathers food from retail partners, restaurants, manufacturers, and local farmers.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Virginia Peninsula Foodbank’s Culinary Training Program offers a 12-week free training program for eligible adults to develop skills that can lead to jobs and self-reliance.

Population(s) Served
Adults

SHARE, Self-Help And Resource Exchange, is a community building program that offers nutritious food packages at discounted prices.

Population(s) Served
Adults

The Foodbank’s Mobile Food Pantry Program delivers and distributes fresh, healthy food directly into the communities that need it.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Affiliations & memberships

United Way Member Agency 1986

American National Red Cross 1986

Association of Fundraising Professionals - Member 2014

Feeding America 1986

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Total Meals Distributed into the Community By Fiscal Year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Unemployed people, Veterans, Economically disadvantaged people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Based on a USDA formula in which one "meal" equates to 1.2 pounds, this is the amount of meals distributed into the community through our agencies and programs during the 2022 fiscal year.

Total Pounds of Food Distributed into the Community By Fiscal Year

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Economically disadvantaged people, Victims of disaster, Veterans

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Context Notes

Total pounds of food distributed through all agencies and programs into our community during the most recent fiscal year.

Number of elementary school children participating weekly in the Food for Kids BackPack Program

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Children and youth

Related Program

Backpack Program

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of elementary school children designated as at risk for food insecurity that receive portable bags of nutritious food weekly during the school year to eat over the weekends.

Our Sustainable Development Goals

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn more about Sustainable Development Goals.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Virginia Peninsula Foodbank has three main objectives that we aim to accomplish each and every day. We aim to ensure future capability to acquire, store, and distribute food effectively for those in need throughout our greater Peninsula community. We continue to develop and grow partnerships with agencies, other nonprofit organizations, foundations, corporations, community donors, and volunteers in order to work collaboratively to provide food for those who are facing food insecurity. Finally, we ensure that we maintain a constant focus on providing nutritious food options for our neighbors in need so that we are helping them live a healthy lifestyle.

The Virginia Peninsula Foodbank strives to provide hunger relief and hope to individuals, families, children, senior citizens, and veterans who face food insecurity each day. We partner with over 170 member agencies made up of faith-based organizations, food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters and community centers across our service area for people to turn to in times of need, and together, we have provided over 147 million meals. We maintain a strong, visible presence in the community, and make sure all of our programs are executed efficiently. We acquire food through donations and purchasing and distribute effectively in collaboration with community partner agencies as well as our own programs. While we are fully aware of the meaningful impact we can make, we cannot do it without strong partnerships, food and fund donations, volunteer energy, and community grants.

The Virginia Peninsula Foodbank is composed of a strong, committed, and dedicated staff led by an experienced and highly skilled management team. There is no organization on the Peninsula that is able to distribute food as effectively as we do on such a large scale with access to as many resources. It is undeniably true that we could not do the work that we do without the help of our over 120 partner agencies. Without them, it would be very difficult to reach as many people as we do. They expand our impact beyond what we could achieve with our small staff and fleet of trucks alone. However, it is the Foodbank that has the capability to seek and obtain food from sources and entities that no one else can, and we can often receive rates for purchasing food that are cost-effective and competitively priced. It is our staff that trains partner agency representatives in food safety and proper distribution methods. We have a large warehouse that is unrivaled among other food distribution organizations, and we continue to strengthen our relationships with local print and television media to raise awareness of food insecurity and promote our hunger relief efforts. Our partnerships with other nonprofit organizations and our visible presence in the community makes the Foodbank the premier hunger relief resource in the community, and we are proud of the work that we do to alleviate the challenges faced by people who are facing food insecurity.

Last fiscal year (ending June 30, 2020), we distributed over 12.7 million pounds of food, which equates to nearly 10.6 million meals provided to our neighbors in need. This is a record amount of food distributed in any year throughout our organization's history, and we always strive to increase our impact if possible with each new year. We consistently focus on locating new avenues for collaboration, discovering innovative ways to distribute food effectively, acquiring and distributing food items with an emphasis on nutrition and community health, identifying populations and communities that are not being served, and honing and strengthening our programs to maximize their effectiveness. Food insecurity occurs during all seasons and can affect any person or family. The Virginia Peninsula Foodbank will continue to work tirelessly to meet this need and give our community the hope and comfort that accompanies being properly nourished.

In 2020, we also reaffirmed our role as an essential human services and basic needs resource following a disaster or emergency. The COVID-19 pandemic brought new faces of food insecurity to our agencies and programs. Our ability to be flexible, adapting our distributions and volunteer opportunities to a safer, social distanced model, enabled us to meet increased requests for food assistance. Our community donors, volunteers, and advocates also stepped up remarkably to help make our mission possible. For 35 years, our community has remained our most valuable resource.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We demonstrated a willingness to learn more by reviewing resources about feedback practice.
done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • Who are the people you serve with your mission?

    Through our food assistance programs, we serve individuals, families, children, seniors, and veterans who are experiencing food insecurity. This means that they are unable to access the food they need to feed themselves or their families and live a healthy lifestyle. While we do serve those who are caught in a cycle of poverty and face chronic food insecurity, we also provide support for people who are confronting short-term disruptions to their lives, such as a job loss, medical emergency, accident, or unexpected expenses. We aim to provide food assistance to these neighbors to sustain them until they can regain stability. At the Foodbank, we serve anyone who needs our help.

  • How is your organization collecting feedback from the people you serve?

    Electronic surveys (by email, tablet, etc.), Paper surveys, Focus groups or interviews (by phone or in person), Constituent (client or resident, etc.) advisory committees,

  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals,

  • What significant change resulted from feedback?

    In November 2020, we participated in a mapping project in partnership with a local university to determine what portions of our service area were seeing a saturation of food assistance services and which areas lacked adequate access to food distributions. This project also included demographic information to help us improve equity in our services. One aspect of the project was to conduct a survey of different demographic groups to determine how we could provide more culturally appropriate food at our food distributions. From these responses, we now purchase and include specific culturally appropriate food items tailored to these groups at our mobile food pantry and partner agency distributions.

  • With whom is the organization sharing feedback?

    Our staff, Our board, Our community partners,

  • How has asking for feedback from the people you serve changed your relationship?

    Our partner agencies are crucial to our success in food distribution. They help us reach far more people than would be possible with our small paid staff and fleet of trucks alone. By bringing agencies and food assistance recipients into communication circles, we are able to advocate for the financial allocation of resources and programmatic offerings they determine would be most beneficial. They are the ones actually executing and benefiting from our programs, and asking for feedback offers a grassroots approach to designing programs, as opposed to a top-down model. Our partner agencies and those we served are empowered to make appropriate changes and offer first-hand knowledge that will lead to enhanced and strengthened best practices and operations.

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We act on the feedback we receive,

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback, It is difficult to find the ongoing funding to support feedback collection, Staff find it hard to prioritize feedback collection and review due to lack of time, It is difficult to identify actionable feedback,

Financials

Virginia Peninsula Foodbank
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Virginia Peninsula Foodbank

Board of directors
as of 09/02/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board chair

Mr. Jonathan Toms

Smithfield Foods

Term: 2022 - 2023

Sherwin Stewart

Sentara Healthcare

Erik Mills

W.M. Jordan Company

Gary Hunter

Hampton University

Tiffany Boyle

Newport News Commissioner of the Revenue

Michael Jacobs

Ferguson Enterprises

Elizabeth Mulherin

Community Volunteer

Sylvia Weinstein-Craft

Oyster Pointer

Shawn Flanagan

Newport News Shipbuilding

Joseph Witt

Old Point National Bank

Jeffrey Verhoef

PIVOT Physical Therapy

Terry Morris

NASA

Curtis Baker

Langley Federal Credit Union

Michael Doucette

Riverside Health Systems

Patrick Murphrey

Newport News Assistant City Attorney

Jennifer Muse

Attorney, Sands Anderson

Ira Williams

BayPort Credit Union

Board leadership practices

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

GuideStar worked with BoardSource, the national leader in nonprofit board leadership and governance, to create this section.

  • Board orientation and education
    Does the board conduct a formal orientation for new board members and require all board members to sign a written agreement regarding their roles, responsibilities, and expectations? Yes
  • CEO oversight
    Has the board conducted a formal, written assessment of the chief executive within the past year ? Yes
  • Ethics and transparency
    Have the board and senior staff reviewed the conflict-of-interest policy and completed and signed disclosure statements in the past year? Yes
  • Board composition
    Does the board ensure an inclusive board member recruitment process that results in diversity of thought and leadership? Yes
  • Board performance
    Has the board conducted a formal, written self-assessment of its performance within the past three years? Yes

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 9/2/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Female, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

 

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 03/03/2021

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Data
  • We review compensation data across the organization (and by staff levels) to identify disparities by race.
  • We analyze disaggregated data and root causes of race disparities that impact the organization's programs, portfolios, and the populations served.
  • We disaggregate data to adjust programming goals to keep pace with changing needs of the communities we support.
  • We employ non-traditional ways of gathering feedback on programs and trainings, which may include interviews, roundtables, and external reviews with/by community stakeholders.
  • We disaggregate data by demographics, including race, in every policy and program measured.
Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We measure and then disaggregate job satisfaction and retention data by race, function, level, and/or team.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.