PLATINUM2024

Thurman Brisben Homeless Shelter Inc

A Place for Transformation

aka Brisben Center; Thurman Brisben Center   |   Fredericksburg, VA   |  https://www.brisbencenter.org

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Mission

Our mission is to provide temporary shelter and equip residents for employability to resolve poverty and obtain housing.

Notes from the nonprofit

While administrative and fundraising costs comprised 38% of our FY23 expenses, several related factors merit consideration. • Our 16,000 s.f. shelter facility carries no mortgage and has nominal maintenance costs. • Owing to photo-voltaic roof panels, high-efficiency HVAC units and LED lighting, our electricity costs (previously $24,000/year) are now negligible. • Food is nearly all donated. At $4.00/meal, this amounts to $175,200 of in-kind contributions each year. • Volunteers are integral to the program. They prepare and serve most meals, coach clients (e.g., employment & financial skills), contribute fundraising & administrative support, and help maintain the building and grounds. 11,600 volunteer hours are logged annually at a value of $32.59/hour (Independent Sector). This amounts to a yearly in-kind value of $378,044. • With electricity savings, donated food, and volunteer hours factored in, the administrative/fundraising portion of the budget falls to 26.7%.

Ruling year info

1993

CEO

Mr. David Cooper

Main address

471 Central Road

Fredericksburg, VA 22401 USA

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EIN

54-1647219

NTEE code info

Homeless Services/Centers (P85)

Other Housing, Shelter N.E.C. (L99)

Human Services - Multipurpose and Other N.E.C. (P99)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

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Communication

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Homelessness has long been a problem in this region. In the 2023 school year, the local schools reported 1,070 students experiencing homelessness, which, with an average household size of 2.91, amounts to 3,113 homeless individuals. This number does not include the many households without school-age children in “poverty hotels” or precarious doubled-up situations. There are ~32,000 individuals living below the federal poverty line in our region (including 18% of Fredericksburg), many of whom cycle in and out of shelters with the ebb and flow of their resources. In order to truly resolve homelessness, we have to stop this “churn” and its related generational homelessness. Addressing underlying causes is key.

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Transitional Shelter Services

The Transitional Shelter Program provides dignified shelter and transformative supports to stabilize men, women, and children experiencing homelessness and set them on a path to recovery.

Clients meet regularly with a case manager/life coach to obtain housing and resolve the underlying causes of their homelessness. They are connected to programs that address their challenges, such as medical services, employment assistance, renter education, financial literacy, parenting skills, and children’s activities.

During their time here, most residents gain employment and/or other sources of income. Because there is no charge, clients can save their earnings for housing costs. Increasing revenues and decreasing expenses are their likeliest paths for success.

Our program design is informed by the highly regarded Mobility Mentoring® approach, which incorporates current research into cognitive functioning to help clients overcome the often debilitating stresses of homelessness and poverty.

Population(s) Served
Adults
Children and youth
Homeless people
Extremely poor people
Low-income people

Where we work

Awards

Best Collaboration Award 2023

Fredericksburg Chamber of Commerce

Affiliations & memberships

Mobility Mentoring Level 2 Partner 2019

Our results

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

How does this organization measure their results? It's a hard question but an important one.

Number of bed nights (nights spent in shelter)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Homeless people, Extremely poor people, Low-income people

Related Program

Transitional Shelter Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Total number of clients experiencing homelessness

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Extremely poor people, Homeless people, Low-income people

Related Program

Transitional Shelter Services

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Increasing

Average wage of clients served (in dollars)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Extremely poor people, Homeless people, Low-income people

Related Program

Transitional Shelter Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Target average monthly income at exit for all adults in shelter for 30 days or more and participating in case management. COVID had a decidedly negative impact on wages.

Service connections/supportive services (mental health, sobriety, medical care, veteran benefits, etc.)

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Population(s) Served

Adults, Children and youth, Extremely poor people, Homeless people, Low-income people

Type of Metric

Output - describing our activities and reach

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Total # of connections made with supportive services via case management referrals for clients in shelter 30+ days.

Number of participants who gain employment

This metric is no longer tracked.
Totals By Year
Related Program

Transitional Shelter Services

Type of Metric

Outcome - describing the effects on people or issues

Direction of Success

Holding steady

Context Notes

Number of adults residing at least 30 days that are employed upon exit.

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

The Brisben Center provides temporary/transitional shelter for men, women, and children experiencing homelessness. We help them resolve their immediate crises and develop results-based plans to secure and sustain housing. We help them resolve or begin to resolve the underlying causes of their homelessness so they do not return to it. Measured impacts are livable wage income, sustainable housing, and decreased returns to shelter.

1) The provision of Brisben transitional shelter meets a critical need in this community for men, women, and children who have become homeless. The Brisben Center is not just a shelter, though. It is a child-safe, clean, dignified, orderly, and definitively helpful place to begin the recovery process. Its location on the bus line and provision of loaner bicycles facilitates transportation to employment and business appointments. A computer lab makes it convenient to research jobs, trainings, and career options. Spacious grounds allow for recreation, quiet space, and children’s play areas. A continuous schedule of programs and activities inculcate a culture of progress. The food, prepared and served by community volunteers, is nutritious and delicious. Clients feel cared about.

2) After clients are settled in and no longer in a state of shock, they begin to address their immediate barriers to housing with an assigned case manager. Do they need an ID? Do they have sustainable income? How much debt? Can they work? What is the state of their mental and physical health? Are criminal and/or eviction records holding them back? Do their children have special needs?


3) Most residents want to return to housing as quickly as possible. However, more profound changes are usually required to overcome the poverty underlying most instances of homelessness, and this is where the Brisben Center goes well beyond the role of a typical shelter. We provide clients with as many opportunities as we can to make such transformation possible. Mobility Mentoring® is the most ambitious of these, but the other afore-mentioned services, such as job help, also play a critical role. In its programmatic choices, staff is ever guided by the desired impacts of livable wage income, sustainable housing, and decreased returns to shelter.

• Provide and maintain a 16,000 square foot, energy-efficient, transitional shelter, fully staffed and open 24/7 year-round to stabilize and temporarily shelter women, children and men, both families with children and single adults.
• Retain professional, experienced staff who provide transformative case management to help clients regain housing and work on resolving the underlying causes of their poverty and homelessness.
• Direct a full complement of in-house and external programs that help clients address whatever barriers they are facing, especially in the area of income and income generation.
• Retain a team of skillful and compassionate shelter monitors who, around the clock, oversee safe and productive shelter life for those who call the Brisben Center their temporary home.
• Utilize a Mobility Mentoring®, evidence-based approach that engages clients to ensure client's set goals achieved.
• Retain a skilled kitchen manager to provide healthy, satisfying meals through the support of volunteers and in-kind donors.
• Continue applying a comprehensive system of social metrics—data collection, analysis, and reporting—to ascertain progress and inform program design.
• Maintain a strong and dynamic base of community volunteers who provide facility & grounds upkeep, activities staffing, administrative/fundraising support, board service, and more. Our close connection to the community has historically been, and remains, critical to the fulfillment of our mission.

• Since 1988, the Brisben Center has been greater Fredericksburg’s main provider of shelter and services to families and individuals experiencing homelessness. Those 35 years of experience give us a clear understanding of approaches that work. Three board members are former residents.
• Master’s level trained case management/life coach staff, in addition to many years of professional experience, ensure clients are provided with the best possible guidance.
• A commitment to evidence-based outcomes and a state-of-the-art social metrics database allows us to document outputs/outcomes in great detail, make programmatic modifications as warranted, and report back to stakeholders with transparency and increasing sophistication.
• Fiscal prudence keeps costs low. We own the building outright. Staff wear multiple hats. A rooftop solar array and other climate-friendly upgrades keep electricity costs near zero. Volunteers provide, prepare, and serve nearly all the meals—amounting to substantial cost savings. Our 2,500 volunteers maintain the building & grounds, provide administrative/fundraising support, staff activities, and much more. They are an integral part of the organization.
• A strong working partnership with EMPath, the developer of Mobility Mentoring®.
• Programmatic partnerships with many agencies, such as the Virginia Department of Health, Virginia Cooperative Extension, area public schools, Germanna Community College, BrightView Treatment Center, Departments of Social Service, and the Rappahannock Area Community Services Board.

Since CEO David Cooper took the helm in 2018, the Brisben Center has made tremendous progress toward its goals.
• A three-year strategic plan (2020-23), the board’s first, was adopted in 2019 with the guidance of a BoardSource facilitator. Also updated were the organization’s mission, vision, values, and by-laws. The plan was updated in CY2023.
• The Brisben Bridge Theory of Change was published in 2021.
• Staff is now regularly trained in Mental Health First Aid, CPR/First Aid, Mandated Reporter, and Revive (overdose response).
• A Brisben Center approach to Mobility Mentoring® is being progressively integrated with case management so participating clients’ experience will be seamless from their intake to a year or more post-shelter.
• A full-time kitchen manager/chef is overseeing the production and quality of meals.
• The Apricot Core database by Social Solutions continues to measure our outputs and outcomes.
• Capital improvements include a 115Kw rooftop solar array, high-efficiency HVAC units with a UV microbial/bacteriostatic filter, a changeover to LED lighting, major build-out of office space, and replacement of commercial kitchen appliances.
• The Brisben Center’s congregate shelter faced massive challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. With scores of fatalities in assisted living facilities near and far, we had exceedingly difficult choices to make. With tremendous work of an ad hoc board/staff committee, guidance from local health epidemiologists & OSHA, and the grace of God, we got through it without any deaths or debilitating cases.

How we listen

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Seeking feedback from people served makes programs more responsive and effective. Here’s how this organization is listening.

done We shared information about our current feedback practices.
  • How is your organization using feedback from the people you serve?

    To identify and remedy poor client service experiences, To identify bright spots and enhance positive service experiences, To make fundamental changes to our programs and/or operations, To inform the development of new programs/projects, To identify where we are less inclusive or equitable across demographic groups, To strengthen relationships with the people we serve, To understand people's needs and how we can help them achieve their goals

  • Which of the following feedback practices does your organization routinely carry out?

    We collect feedback from the people we serve at least annually, We take steps to get feedback from marginalized or under-represented people, We aim to collect feedback from as many people we serve as possible, We take steps to ensure people feel comfortable being honest with us, We look for patterns in feedback based on demographics (e.g., race, age, gender, etc.), We look for patterns in feedback based on people’s interactions with us (e.g., site, frequency of service, etc.), We engage the people who provide feedback in looking for ways we can improve in response, We act on the feedback we receive, We share the feedback we received with the people we serve

  • What challenges does the organization face when collecting feedback?

    It is difficult to get the people we serve to respond to requests for feedback

Financials

Thurman Brisben Homeless Shelter Inc
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Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

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Connect with nonprofit leaders

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Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

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Thurman Brisben Homeless Shelter Inc

Board of directors
as of 07/12/2024
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

CAPT Paul Stanton

U.S. Navy (Retired)

Term: 2020 - 2024


Board co-chair

Mr. David Gazzetta

Retired business executive

Term: 2021 - 2024

Paul Stanton

U.S. Navy, retired (Chair)

David Gazzetta

Retired business executive (Vice Chair)

Carol Allison

Retired work/family life consultant (Secretary)

Carolyn Johnson

VP, Virginia Partners Bank (Treasurer)

Roberto Canizares, MD

Retired physician (Emeritus)

David Cooper

CEO, Brisben Center (Ex Officio)

Chris Chitty, Esq.

Tax Attorney

Januari Coates

Franchise Owner, Exit Leading Edge Realty

Tony Lewis

Dean of Students, Fredericksburg Public Schools

Rick Nehrboss

Retired business owner

Sandi Pace

Owner, Fitness Equipment Repair & Assembly LLC

Felicia Charles

Pastor, Living Word Fellowship Church

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 7/5/2024

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? Candid partnered with CHANGE Philanthropy on this demographic section.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

Gender identity

Transgender Identity

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data

Equity strategies

Last updated: 07/05/2024

GuideStar partnered with Equity in the Center - an organization that works to shift mindsets, practices, and systems to increase racial equity - to create this section. Learn more

Policies and processes
  • We seek individuals from various race backgrounds for board and executive director/CEO positions within our organization.
  • We have community representation at the board level, either on the board itself or through a community advisory board.
  • We help senior leadership understand how to be inclusive leaders with learning approaches that emphasize reflection, iteration, and adaptability.
  • We engage everyone, from the board to staff levels of the organization, in race equity work and ensure that individuals understand their roles in creating culture such that one’s race identity has no influence on how they fare within the organization.