Character.org

aka Character.org   |   Sterling, VA   |  www.character.org

Mission

Providing global leadership, voice, and resources for developing character in families, schools, and organizations.

Ruling year info

1993

President & CEO

Arthur Schwartz

Main address

P.O. Box 650307

Sterling, VA 20165 USA

Show more contact info

EIN

54-1657505

NTEE code info

Education N.E.C. (B99)

Youth Development Programs (O50)

Citizen Participation (W24)

IRS filing requirement

This organization is required to file an IRS Form 990 or 990-EZ.

Sign in or create an account to view Form(s) 990 for 2019, 2018 and 2017.
Register now

Communication

Blog

Programs and results

What we aim to solve

This profile needs more info.

If it is your nonprofit, add a problem overview.

Login and update

Our programs

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

What are the organization's current programs, how do they measure success, and who do the programs serve?

Schools of Character Program

In Schools of Character, adults embrace their critical role as models. Teachers work together—with parents and community members as partners—to positively shape the social, emotional, and character development of the young people entrusted to them. As a result, students feel safe, respected, and connected to those around them, allowing them to thrive academically and socially and be motivated to give back to their communities. Character.org’s Schools of Character program offers K-12 public, private, and charter schools and districts a path to school improvement and excellence through character education. When schools engage in the process and seek to implement Character.org’s 11 Principles of Effective Character Education, they:
-Bring teachers, administrators, support staff, parents, students, community members together to identify a common set of core values and unite around a common purpose
-Go through a process of self-assessment that helps the school identify strengths and next

Population(s) Served
Adults

Each year, the National Forum on Character Education brings together key stakeholders in education to work toward a common goal: quality character education in all schools. Teachers, school leaders, community members, scholars and businesspeople gather to network, learn from each other and share best practices in character education. Inspiring keynote speakers offer big picture thinking on challenging education issues and share the latest research. Top scholars and experienced educators lead breakout sessions on topics such as student leadership, anti-bullying, service learning, academic integrity, and school climate, while participants dig deeper into pressing issues during interactive hot topic discussions. Participants leave the Forum with a renewed sense of what effective character education looks like; concrete ideas to implement in their classrooms, schools, or communities; and an understanding of the importance of character development both in schools and in society.

Population(s) Served
Adults

Where we work

Awards

Russell C. Hill Award for Developing Responsible Citizenship 2009

Learning for Life

The Earth Matters Award 2008

Turtle Wings

Goals & Strategy

SOURCE: Self-reported by organization

Learn about the organization's key goals, strategies, capabilities, and progress.

Charting impact

Four powerful questions that require reflection about what really matters - results.

Character.org's ultimate goal is for every school to be a school of character where students flourish academically and do the right thing. We want students to graduate from school being both smart and good. We achieve this goal by training and providing resources to empower teachers, coaches, parents, and others in the community who have a direct impact on the character development of children.

In each School of Character we expect to see improved academic achievement, reduced reports of bullying, reduced disciplinary issues, reduced violence, increased graduation rates and attendance, increased community involvement, increased election participation, increased teacher satisfaction and retention, increased parental involvement and increased student engagement. In general, students should become more respectful, responsible communicators who will ultimately be better prepared for the workforce, as well as engaged and ethical citizens. Our goal is also to see schools of character in every state in the country.

In order to fully achieve this vision, we must:
• Expand our scope / capacity / customer base / training cadre
• Leverage technology to increase our audience
• Establish fiscal self-sustainability

In order to reach our goals, Character.org provides opportunities and resources for teachers and others to help them educate children to have good character. We do this through the following key programs:

1. The National Forum on Character Education: This national conference brings together researchers and practitioners to see what works in character education. Inspirational keynotes, practical workshops, and a variety of training sessions help all attendees go home with ideas ready to implement.

2. Our online web resource center (www.character.org): Provides lesson plans, discussions on key topics, and many other resources—most available for free.

3. The Schools of Character Program: Many applicants have told us that the very act of applying and reflecting deeply on their school's situation leads to school improvement. In addition we provide free professional feedback to all who apply.

4. Promising Practices Awards: This recognition program for individual teachers encourages everyone to implement strategies and programs to help children improve.

5. Professional Development: Our trainings help schools understand how to implement effective character education based on our research-based framework, the 11 Principles of Effective Character Education. We also offer The 11 Principles Sourcebook, a compendium of resources and examples to help schools apply the 11 Principles of Effective Character Education.

We feel that these programs, especially in combination, can prepare teachers to develop a classroom and school climate where students thrive.

Character.org has 25 years of experience with schools and educators and a cadre of experts who advise us based upon child development research. Our Education Advisory Council includes well-known researchers in the field like Dr. Michele Borba, Dr. Marvin Berkowitz, Dr. Maurice Elias, and Dr. Tom Lickona.

Our 11 Principles of Effective Character Education framework is research-based and provides us with a roadmap in all of our work. We have a network of 30 state-level affiliates who extend our reach, and a network of like-minded organizations partners and contractors that we call upon for various projects. We also have a membership base which is dedicated to character development and a passionate team who believes in our vision.

Outcomes achieved: Character.org's Schools of Character program has really grown. When first established we selected only 10 National Schools of Character to serve as exemplar models. Now we consider it to be a school improvement program, and name all schools that reach the exemplar status based on our 11 Principles of Effective Character Education. Since 1997 we have recognized over 250 schools.

Seven years ago we decided that schools would retain their national designation for five years, giving them more time to mentor other schools and to provide outreach. In 2013 we named our first repeat National School of Character. We have increased our State Schools of Character network to 30 states. Several of these states have produced phenomenal results.

Not only has the network of schools of character increased, we have seen the concept grow from schools to the community and from school district to statewide standards. For example, Pleasanton, California became a Community of Character after several of their schools and district were named National Schools of Character. Now the city council, police department and other organizations recognize the same core values and refer to character as important just like the schools do. Kansas became the first state in the country to adopt statewide standards for character development.

Outcomes not yet realized: We have not yet established coordinators in 20 states and we have not named Schools of Character or Promising Practices in 3 states.

What works and doesn't work: From post-event surveys we have learned that our National Forum is very successful in helping schools with their character education programs. We have also adjusted our Schools of Character publication to become a more mainstream magazine with great practical use for those aspiring to become schools of character.

Adjustments to goals, strategies or objectives: Because school budgets have been cut severely in recent years and because federal and state policies have focused almost exclusively on test scores, schools have had reduced funding for professional development. So we have had to re-examine at how we deliver our services. We have created some webinars in the past few years to provide a lower cost alternative to trainings. We have also created a scholarship pool for those needing help in attending the Forum, and we have put more emphasis on providing resources via our website.

Financials

Character.org
lock

Unlock financial insights by subscribing to our monthly plan.

Subscribe

Unlock nonprofit financial insights that will help you make more informed decisions. Try our monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights?
Learn more about GuideStar Pro.

Operations

The people, governance practices, and partners that make the organization tick.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

lock

Connect with nonprofit leaders

Subscribe

Build relationships with key people who manage and lead nonprofit organizations with GuideStar Pro. Try a low commitment monthly plan today.

  • Analyze a variety of pre-calculated financial metrics
  • Access beautifully interactive analysis and comparison tools
  • Compare nonprofit financials to similar organizations

Want to see how you can enhance your nonprofit research and unlock more insights? Learn More about GuideStar Pro.

Character.org

Board of directors
as of 1/18/2022
SOURCE: Self-reported by organization
Board co-chair

Mr. Clay Hamlin III

Character Education Partnership dba/Character.org

Term: 2013 - 2021


Board co-chair

Michael Dutton

Intellegi, Inc.

Term: 2017 - 2023

Linda McKay

Scott Sillers

Levensohn Venture Partners

Glenn Wilke

Midtown Educational Foundation

Rich Bagin

National School Public Relations Association

Bray Barnes

Municipal Finance & Services Corp.

Robert Fisicaro

Haddon Township School District

Nora Carr

Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation

Suhail Farooqui

K12 Insight

Joseph Carvin

One World

Clay Hamilin IV

FK Partners

Peter Donovan

Wright Investors’ Service

Elizabeth Huntley

Advocate, Author, Speaker

Scarlett Lewis

The Jesse Lewis Choose Love Movement

John Liporace

Taylor Global

J. Andrew Miller

Retired Partner Ernst & Young LLP

Organizational demographics

SOURCE: Self-reported; last updated 01/18/2022

Who works and leads organizations that serve our diverse communities? GuideStar partnered on this section with CHANGE Philanthropy and Equity in the Center.

Leadership

The organization's leader identifies as:

Race & ethnicity
White/Caucasian/European
Gender identity
Male, Not transgender (cisgender)
Sexual orientation
Heterosexual or Straight
Disability status
Person without a disability

Race & ethnicity

No data

Gender identity

No data

 

No data

Sexual orientation

No data

Disability

No data